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Essays on the Life and Teaching of Master W. Fard Muhammad the Foundation of the Nation of Islam

Essays on the Life and Teaching of Master W. Fard Muhammad the Foundation of the Nation of Islam

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Essays on the life and teaching of Master W. Fard Muhammad The foundation of the Nation of Islam
Essays on the life and teaching of Master W. Fard Muhammad The foundation of the Nation of Islam

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Published by: ephraim7 on Feb 28, 2011
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11/27/2012

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FOREWORD
These
essays
crystallize
over
two
decades
of
researchandreflection.
thapier
oneexplores
the
antecedents
of
the
Nation
of
lslam
-
the
u.N.l.A.and
the
Moorish
Science
Temple;
and
it
giu"t
a
biographical
sketch
of
the
enigmatic
Master
W'
Fard
iltrhammaJ.
ihe
inforration
about
MasterFard
is
generally
knownby
pioneers
andveteran
students,
but
it
exist
as
oral
traditionor
it
is
written
in
obscurescattered
sources-
Here
for
thefirst
timeit
is
treated
in
a
comprehensive
fashion'
Chapter
two
is
an
interpretation
of
the
meaning
and
life
of
fU"ri"1.
W.
F. .
Muhammad.lt
argues
that
Fard
was
a
sufi
mystic
bydrawing
mainlyon
thewritings
of
ldriesShah
and
Hazrat
l.
r-han.
t
also
rugg"rtthe
Africanityandsufism
are
naturalaffinities
because
oftheit.extensive
grounding
in
symbolism.
chapter
three
examines
the
theosophical
aspects
of
Master
Fard's
teaching,
which
I
refer
to
as
the"inner
script'"
The
theosophical-principle
of
divine
mind
is
nurtured
andactualizedby
spiritual
government'I
explore
and
fill
in
the
gapsothistheosophyandconceptofspiritualgovernmentby
ihe
deployment
of
suficoncepts'
The
Fardian
system
.onrtitut.si
spiritual
map
or
away
for
those
who
understandit.Finally
these
essays
attempt
to
advancescholarly
discourse
ueyond
the
notionthat
the
Nation
was simply
a
cultled
by
a
charismatic
leader.
To
the
contrary,
I
believe
it
not
only
continued
Garvey's
economic
nationalistic
tradition,
but
it
contained
a
profound
theosophical
system'
HAKIM
SHABATZ
BUFFALO,NEWYORK
J
U
LY,
1990INTRODUCTION
I
rrrally,
here
is
the
information,
rongsearched
for
by
those
(,rcdt
souls,
andseeking
sours
whoknew
there
was
more
to
lrfe'ingeneral,and
the
Nation
of
rsram
in
particurar,
than
whatrrr.t
the
eye.
rt
is
written
in
the
precise,con4ise,
iactuar
andrr:nsitive
manner
of
onlythose
who
are
divinely
guided.
As
great,
profound
and
necessary
as
the
natioriof
lslam
is,
for
\orne
unfathomed
reason,many
spirituaily
advanced
and
.'t:eking
souls
courd
not
comfortabry
r..or,.nodate
their
rrrtrinsicbeing
intothe
structure,
as
ihe
Nor
was
physicaily
r'nstituted-yet,the
frawress
spirituarity
greamedfrom
"Mosquemeetings"and
the
greatbody
otliterature
was
wrthout
a
doubt,
the
right
needed
and
used
uv
r"nv
to
find
llre.ir
way
to
physicar
and
spirituar
furfiilmentin
an
oppressed
rociety.
Some
moved
on
to
find
varying
degree,
oi
,r...r,
wrthout
an
intimate
relationship
with
rnJruati6nof
rsram.
others
cultivateci
an intimate,
working
relationship
with
The
N'rtion,adhering
to
ail
the
disciprines
oithe
body,
exceptthose
rrot
needed
for
theirspirituar
evorvement.
and
though
they
rlrd
not
jointhe
rankand fire,yet
theirwork
inharmony,and
in
'.rrpport
of
The
Nation
is
so
great,they
are
often
mistikenfor
"rcgistered
muslims."
l-ortunately,therewere
thousands
who
gradry
sufferedthe
'r
f
f
ronts
that
one
must,
if
youare
going
to
b6come
a
part
of
any
.l
th€
disciplined,organizedformations
that
are
absolutely
.*cessary
forthe
general
welfare
of
thecaptiveAfrican
Nation
rr
"the
wilderness
of
North
America."The
rewards
of
those
wlro
stayed
the
course,
and
received
their
,,X,,
is
self
evident:
llrcy
maintained
goodstanding,
physicaily
andspiiituaily,
wrthin
the
Nations'structure,
as
they-found
and
acceptedit,
lrrally
easing
on
into
positions
of
officiardom
and
readership
wrthin
the
hierarchy.
others
maintained
ggo.d
standingspirituaily
and
physicaily,
kceping
low
profires
withinthe
ranki
of
the!"n"r"t
tiooy
oi
lt'lievers,
while
reris.hing
in
the
profoundspilituar
teachings
tlratlie
beyond
the
basic
knowredge
that
was
rifting
afri."n,
,rt
of
"the
graves,'
forming
themin
disciplined
ran-ks,
in
an
 
()r(l(,r
llr,rt
.rllowed
for
a
universal
advance
for
therace'
And
tlrorrrllrtlrt:y
rrtay
not
have
taken
positions
of
leadership,orrorrlrl
rrot
t..rsrly
share
the
inner
light
they
were
receiving
from
tlrt.
oslt,r
le.rchings,
theywere
the
pillars
thatthe
ranks
ofthe
lJr.lrr,vr.rs
lrnged
upon.
llow1v3r,
u[or,
the
fall
of
the
Nation,after
thedeparture
of
Mt,.,sr.nt-;er
ElijahMuhammad,these
pillars
for
the
ranks,
were
loosc,rrcd
from
the
physical
structure,
but
held
tenaciously
to
rhe
profound
inner spirituality
they
hadgleamed
from
the
expc:rience,
taking their
studies
and
research
to
new
levels
of
urrderstanding
ofthat
which
The
Nation
of
lslam
is
all
about.
Arrd
while
they
eagerly
anticipate
the
level,
time
and
place
atwhich
they
will
reioin
the
physical
structure,
forthe
mostpart,
they
have
notfound a
formation
that
will
justify
the
submersion
of
that
spiritualknowledge
that
the
rankand
fileonly
receive
momentary
glimpses
of,
the
revelation
of
which
may
well
have
a
net,negativeaffect,
unlessa
certaindegree
of
evolvement
has
already
been
attained.
Now,here
in
this
book,
Brother
Hakim
Shabazz
have
culminatedmany,many
years
of
research
andstudy
into
a
treatise
that
is
going
to
be
a
delightful
andrewarding
experi-
ence
for
The Great
soul
as
well
as
the
seeking
soul,and
all
in
between.
ROOTS
OF
THE
NATION
OF
ISLAM
l',tamic
theologyin
the
AfricanAmerican
community
has
its
rrots
in
theteachings
of
Marcus
Moziah
Garvey
in
general,
and
rrr
NobleDrew
Ali
inparticular.
From
1930
to
1975
Afro-tslam
w.rs
dominated
by
the
teachings
and
work
of the
Honorable
llrlah
Muhammad.
lt
was
Marcus
Moziah
Garvey however,wlro
laid
the
foundationforthe
emergence
of
Nobre
DrewAli
.rrrd
Master
W.
Fard
Muhammad.
Garvey
achieved
this
by
.stablishing
a
significantAfrican
theological
component
within
lrrr
overallimprovementefforts.
llre
Garveyites
sought
to
make
the
church
anagent
of
social
r
lr.rnge,
and
to
utilizeit
to
foster
positive
Africanimages.
The
AfricanAmericanchurch
has
already
established
a
positive
Ir.rckrecord
by
syncretizing
christian
music
with
various
Af
ricanisms
and
by
using
christianity
as
a means
of
riberation.
Please
enjoy,
and
Understanding.
M
ay
Alla
h
B
less
Yo
u
with
Th
e
Lig
ht
of
H.
Khalif
Khalifah
Ne
wport
Ne
ws,
Virginia
August
|
5,
|990
iii
 
{
(
I
churches
took
pridein naming
themselves
AfricanBaptistand
AfricanMethodist,
which
meant
that
they
took
pridein
their
African
origins.
Garvey
developed
these
Africanisms
by
taking
their
theoiogies
to
logical
limits.
Garveyism
insisted
that
religion
must
beself
edifying
and secularly
relevant.
African
theology
for
Garveyhad
to
strengthen
the
will
and
self-determination
of
those
he
wanted
to
free-
One
of
Garvey's
favorite
biblicaltextswas
Psalms
68:31,
which
promised
that
,princes
shall
come
forth
from
Egypt;
Ethiopiashallsoon
stretch
forth
her
hand
to
God."
However,
before
Africacould
be
redeemed,diasporicAfricanshad
to
redeemthemselves
from
the
errors
they
had
learned
through
Europeanreligions'
Africans
werenot only
chosen
people,
but
a
choosing
people
-
asLawrence
W.
Levinephrased
it,
"a
people
with
the
same
opportunities,
the
same
possibilities,
the
same
potential control
over
their
destiny
as
every
other
people-'*1
A
Garveyite
understood
that
he
was
the
master
of
his
fate,
and
the
controller
of
his
destiny.
Yet,selfmastery
is
impossible
without
selflove
and
positiveselfimagery andthis
starts
with
the
image
of
God.
Garvey
agreed
thatalthough
God
in
essence
is
spiritual,
his
(or
her)
form
takes
shape
alongethnic
lines.
Orientals
have eastern
looking
Gods,
Europeans
have
caucasian
featured
Gods'
TherefLre,Africansneed
anAfrican
image
of
God-
To
implement
this
position,
Garvey
called
on
Reverend
GeorgeAlexander
McGuire,a
prominent
Episcopal
clergyman
wholeft
hisBoston
pulpit
in
1920
to
become
chaplain
General
of
the
Universal
Negro
lmprovement
Association
(u.N.l.A.).
McGuire
developed
an
Afrocentric
theologyand
ritual;
he
is
also
responsible
for the
establishment
of
the
Black
christand
Black
Madonna
of
the
African
Orthodoxchurch.
They believed
that
Africans
must
develop
a
theologyrooted
in
their
own
ancestry
and
heritage,
andillustrated
in
conformity
with their
own
physicalappearance.
This intenseAfrocentrism
not
only
infiuencedChristianity
(and
the
Harlem
Renaissance
in
general)
but
also
impactedon
lslamic
and
Judaic
elements
in
the
African
American
community.
Garvey
was
raiseda
cathoric,but
hehad
a
strong
affinityfor
the
religion
of
rslam.Thiswas
based
on
his
respectioithework'r.d.writings
of
Edward.witmotBryden.
He
fiequentry
quoted
fflyden's
christianity,
tslam
and
tie
Negro
Race
(1g77).
This
lslamic
connection
was
arso
enhan.-"0
uy
caiuey,s
crose
r.lationship
with
Duse
MuhammadAri,
a
prominent
mLmber
of
london's
lslamic
community
and
the
pubrisher
of
the
magazine
African
Times
andOrient
Review.
in
a
U.N.l.A. praisesong,
tlrerewas
a
reference
to
"a
chird
of
Ailah.,,
'-Moreover,
.rccording
to
TonyMartin,author
of
RaceFirst,
and
several
.ther
books
on
Garvey,
the
u.N.r.A.'s
universarEthiopian
llymnal,
compiled
by RabbiArnord
J.
Ford
(a
reader
of
Harrem,s
Itlack
Jews),
contained
a
hymn
"Ailah
-Hu-Ak-Bar.,
Further-
rrore,
Dr.
Mufti
MuhammadSadiq
and
other
prominent
AhmadiyyaMuslims,
often
held
their
meetings
at
Garvey,s
lrberty
Hall.*z
Ma.ly
Garveyites
converted
to
the
Ahmadiyya
rrrovement,especially
inDetroit
and
chicago
in
theearly
.1920,s.
(rdrveyism
alsoinfluenced
the
Moorisli
american
science
lemples.
NobleDrew
Ali,
founder
of
the
MoorishAmerican
science
lcmples
(1913)
acknowledged
Garvey,s
influence
on
his
rrrovement.
His
book
,
The
Hory
Koran-seven,
is
reprete
withthe
tcachings
of
Garvey.Moorishscientist
believed
that
Ali
was
the
last
prophet
and
Garvey
John
theBaptist:
John
the
Baptistwas
the
forerunner
of
Jesus
in
those
days,
to
warnand
stir
upthe
rration
and
prepare
them
to
receive
irtediuine
creed
*hi.h
*",
lo
be
taught
by
Jesus.-
.
"rnthesemodern
days
there
came
a
f
orerunner,
who
was
divineryprepared
by
the
jreat
coa-Ailah
,urd
his
name
is
Marcus
Garvey...";,
tthai
also
-been
suggested
that
Elijah
Muhammad
was
anactivemember
of
tr-re
u.rrr.r.n.
(.,
well
as
the
Ahmadiyya
Movement.
we
shourd
arso
note
that
I
lijah
emphasized
the
writings
of
MualanaMuhammadAli,
the
.minent
Ahmadiyyaschorar).
In
summary,
both
NobreDrew
Ari
'rrd
ElijahMuhammad
were
infruenced
by
MarcusMoziah
(iarvey's
nationalism
'and
theorogy,
they
merery
transtated
rt

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