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ANLetter Volume 7 Issue 1-Nov 2000-EQUATIONS

ANLetter Volume 7 Issue 1-Nov 2000-EQUATIONS

Ratings: (0)|Views: 53|Likes:
Alternative Network Letter and ANLetter is EQUATIONS’ newsletter, which was produced until the year 2000. The central aim of the newsletter is to increase awareness on the impacts of tourism, especially on local communities at tourism destinations, and the necessity to make tourism development non-exploitative, equitable and sustainable. The articles, contributions both by EQUATIONS staff team as well as relevant articles commissioned or featured provide a basis for action and change at both policy and implementation stage.

Publisher: Equitable Tourism Options (EQUATIONS)
Contact: info@equitabletourism.org, +91.80.25457607
Visit: www.equitabletourism.org,

Keywords: ANLetter, EQUATIONS Newsletter, Tourism, Tourism Impacts, India, Third World, Non-Exploitative, Equitable, Sustainable, Tourism Policy, Tourism Development, Local Communities
Alternative Network Letter and ANLetter is EQUATIONS’ newsletter, which was produced until the year 2000. The central aim of the newsletter is to increase awareness on the impacts of tourism, especially on local communities at tourism destinations, and the necessity to make tourism development non-exploitative, equitable and sustainable. The articles, contributions both by EQUATIONS staff team as well as relevant articles commissioned or featured provide a basis for action and change at both policy and implementation stage.

Publisher: Equitable Tourism Options (EQUATIONS)
Contact: info@equitabletourism.org, +91.80.25457607
Visit: www.equitabletourism.org,

Keywords: ANLetter, EQUATIONS Newsletter, Tourism, Tourism Impacts, India, Third World, Non-Exploitative, Equitable, Sustainable, Tourism Policy, Tourism Development, Local Communities

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Equitable Tourism Options (EQUATIONS) on Mar 04, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/04/2011

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Eguafions
The
rcadless
traveled.
.
.
The
ANletter
comes
to
youafter
a
gap
af
two
years.
In
thisintervening
period,tourism
development
and the
tourism
debate
have traversedpaths,
which
at
that time may
have
seemed
implausible. Theteam at
EQUATIONS
hasclosely
tracked
these
trajectories andthe
ANletter
in
its
present
form
is
intended to
refl
ect theseshift
s
:
in
the
way
tourism
has
and
is
expanding,
and
in
the
multiple
initiatives,intenentions,
and
responses,
of
govemments,
policy
makers,
stakeholders,
interest lobbies,
concerned
groups,and
communities.
The
process
of
reflecting
on
the
role
of
theAN[etterin
thepast
andour vision
of
its role
in
the future was also anoppofiuniqr
for
us
to
capture the
sffis
in
the lastcouple of
years
in
the
Cirection
andpace
oftourism
development.Inparallel,
we
have
attempted
to
follow
the
way
wehave
organized ourownapproach,
analysis,
and intenentions,
within
EQUMIONS
and
its
networls,
to
respond
to
these
shifts,
Thesech'anges
are clearly reflected
in
the way
the
Nletter
is now
stmcturedand theprioritiesthat
we
address
through
this
very important
tool.
The
speed
and
unabashed
vigorwith
which
tourism
is being
promotedall
over
the
country
is
unprecedented. Peddledas
the new
hope,
prqmises
of
foreign
exchangeeamings,pover$r
allelviation,
employnent
generation,
regenerationof the environment,
andempowering
disadvantaged
groups
such
as
women, it
is
a
mantra
that
is
presented
as
almost
unquestionable
in its
efficacy
The familiar
boundaries
are
rapidly
blurring.
Kerala
has
a
separate
stall at the ITB,
theglobal
mega
tourism-marketing
annual
fair
at
Berlin.
Karnataka's
recent
Global Investors
Meettied
up
l6
tourismprojects
thatare to come up
in
the
statewith
anexpected
investment
of
k.
1566.06crores,
Rajasthan and
Keralahave
forged partnerships
with
the
Vodd
Travel and
TourismCouncil,
which
opened
its India
chapter. The
Andhra
Pradeshgovernmenthas
constituted
a
task
forcefor tourism developmentwith members
from
Malaysiaadvising on
it,
and is
reportedto
be
EQUATIONS
Publ
ication
on
Tourism
Critique
and
Response
Vol
7
No
1
November2000
investing
an
amount
of
k.
5000
crores
in
infrastructurerelated
to
tounsm.
States
in India
that
were
hitherto
not on
the
internationaltouristmap
like
Meghalaya
and
Nagaland
are
being opened
up
forintemationaltourists.
Nagalandwas
under theprotected
area
regrne,
and
fcreign
tourists
are
being allowed inside
for
the
firsttime
after TheForeigners
Order
of
1958.
The
Meghalaya
govemment,on the otherhand,
is
creating
a
securitysquad
for
the
safety
of
their
tourists.
Rajasthan,
it
is
reported,
has
sought
the help
of
paramilitary
forces
for
theprotectionof
their national
pads
and sanctuaries.Not
to
be
leftbehind in
this
mad scramble,central
andstate
tourism
depafiments
are
prolific
in
announcing new
projects
anduniqueselling
propositions.
The Kashmir
government
is
opening
a
new road
to
krgil
to
cash
in
on the imageof the
Ihrgil
war
in
1999.
A new
'palaceon
wheels'train from Mumbai-Ratnagrri-Sindhudurg-Goa-Kolhapur-Pune-AjanthaEllora-Nasik
to
Mumbai
is
planned
by the
Indian
Railways.
Vest
Bengal's
'TourismTownship
in
Midnapore,
Uttar
Pradesh's
tourismthrough
yoga,
Maharashtra's
adventure
tourism,
Rajasthan's
farm
tourism,
the
redefining
of
pilgrimage
circuits,
and
thc
cnthusiasm
with which
monumentsarebeing
declared
as
world
heritage
sites,
are
examples
of
the
state'sinventiveness.
Industrial
consortia
like
CII
and
ASSOCHAM,
and vested
interestgroups
like
the hotel
associations and
tour
operators,
arekeydeterminers
of
the
direction
of
tourism
development.
The
UnionTourismMinister
Mr
AnanthKumar is reportedto
have assured
themthat
tourism
will
be accorded a
status
onparwith
the
IT
sectorInits
quest
to
chasethe elusive
figureof
5
million
foreign
tourist
arivals
in
theyear2000,the
lndian
government
hassigned
tourism
pacts
with countries like
Italyand
Indonesia.
In
the
global
arenathe
action
has
not let
up
either
The
Economic
ard
Social
Council
of the
LT'{
General Assemblv
uroclaimed2002
 
the
International Year
of
Mountains
(resolution53/24
of
l0
November
1998).
The
Assembly
hascalled
on
governmerts,nationaland
internationd.organizations,
NGOs,
andtheprivate
sector, to
nake
voluntary contributions
'and
to
lendother forms
of
supportto
the Year.
The Food
andAgriculture Organization
(IAO)
of
the United Nations
was
invited
to
serve
as
the
leadasencv
forthe
Year.
On
15 Decenber 1998(resolution
53/2001,
the
LlN
Ceneral Assemblv
proclaimed
2002
u
the
International
Year
of
Ecotourism,
as
recommended
by the
Economic
and
Social
Council.
TheAssembly stressed the need
tointegrate sustainabledevelopment
in
the
tourist industry inparticular
'ecotourism
in
developing
countries'.
In
February
2000,
membergovenunenls
of
the
World
Trade
Organisation
(WTO)
have
officially
started
new
multilateral
negotiations
in
seruices,
as
mandated
by
the
General
Agreementon
Trade
in
Services(GATS).
Tourism
will
no doubt
be
a
priority
target
in
these
negotiations:
it
is
one
of
theworld's
biggest
industries
and
has
acquired
an
imporlant
positionin
world
trade.
Inouropinion,
the
GATS
interveles
deeply
into
areas
of nationalandsub-national autonomy
ofthe
countries. The effect
of
such
intrusion
is
accompanied
with
greater problemssince
thestructuresIhat
zrevilal for
the
participation
of
all
concerned are
also
lacking
in
most
developing countries.
Sbcondly, human
rights
violations
in
the
fieldof
tourism
pose
a
fundamental
question
to
the
new
wodd
trade
order, Thirdly,
the
implementation
of
the
commitmentsunder
ttre
GATS
could
Iead
to
a
disregarding
of
the WIO-OMC's commitment
to
sustainabledevelopment
ard
conservation
of
naturalresources.This
is
the contexl
a"s
we
are
ooisedinthis countrv to
receive
the
next Tourism
Policy
document. Since
the last draft
policy
directive
announced
in
1998,
the
evidence
has
only
been
mountingofthe
other,
dark,
face
oftourism.
o
The
usurping of
the
rights
of
localcommunities
to
resources,natural
and
material, and
the
diversionof
these
resources
tothe
"development"
oftourism
o
The
shrinking
space
forpolitical participation
and
abiiitv
to
influence decisions
that imoact livelihood. and
choices
about
how
and
where
to
live.
o
The
irreversible
and
thoughtless
destruction
of
fragile
ecosystems
o
The increasedperipheralisation
of lulnerable
groups
like
children, women, indigenouspeople
are some aspects of
this
dark
sidethat
the
ANletter
is
witnesstoo.
It
is
also witness
toeffofisat
the
regional, national, and
inter-national
levels
to create
spaces
todialogue
and
demand forms
of
development
that are sustainable,
equitable,
and
humane.
The
UnitedNationsCommission
for
Sustainable
Develoonentinits
Seventh Session
inApril
1999devotedits
tilne to tourisrn.
It
stressed that
policydevelopment
and
i
mplementation should
take
place
in
cooperation u,ith
all
interested
parties,
especially theprivate
sector and
local
and
indigerlous
conmunities.
The
right toresources
and
the
need
for
multiple
stakeholder approach
was
reiterated.
EQUATIONS
is
the
southern
co-chair
of
the
NGO
Caucus.
EQUATIONS
workhop
in
collaboration with
the
Kerala
TourismDepafiment,
inJulv
2000, on
the
direction
ofthe
state's
tourismpolicv positedthe
roleof
panchavats
in
the tourism
planning
process.To
handletherangeand
complexiff
of
issues
related
to
tourisrn,
its
manifestations
and
impacts,
we
haveshifted
from
a
H
ighlights
Tourism
Issues
in
India
For
betlerprospects -
a
workshop
to
reviewthepath
oftourism in
Kerala
I
Tourism
Issues
-
International
Tourismandsustainable
development
6
Indigenous
People,
Wildlife
Tourism,
and
Ecotourism
The
governmentshouldputstricter regulations
in
place:Jose
Dominic
l2
Tourism
and
the
Coast
ECR
-
Lrtending
the
Peril
20
Campaigns
Cleaning
up Tourism
:
0n
the campaign onbaruilngplastics
in
Kodaikanal
33
TourismandtheLaw
Bombay HighCourt
at
Goa
Delivers
Major
EnvironmentVerdict
35
Reviews
Towards
Sustainable
Tourism
in
theEverest
Region
ofNepal
39
geographicalfocus
to
understanding
issues
acrossboundaries.You
will
notice that
state
diariesthatwere
an
integral
partof
e'arlier ANleffers have
now
acceded space
to
theme
based
sectious such
as
policvinterventions,
coastal issues,
indigenouspeople,ecotourism,
and
wildlife tourism.
Conspicuous by
their
absence
are the debales on women and
tourism,
the
child
andtourism, and
alternatives
in tourism.
These
will
feature
in
future
Nletters,
building for
you
a
mosaic
ofissuesthat
a
complex
zu:rd
peculiarlymodern
form
of development
such
as
tourism throwsup.
The canvasof
our interventions
ha.s
also expanded
from
primarilv
the South
Indian
states
to nationaland
internafional
arenzs. Wehope
in tirne,
the
ANletter
will
accuratelycapture
and
reflectthis
cnange.1999
saw
us
bid
sad
farewell
and
pay
homageto
two remarkable
individuals
RRSivaling'am
(9''July)
and Martin
Staebler(24"'
November).
As
wego
toprint
we
would
also record
ourcondolences
at
the
passing
awav
of
Desmond
DAbreo
(25
October
2000).
Intheir
passing
away
we
have
lostnotjust
brilliant
minds,but
compassionate
and
visionaryleaders
zurd
indefzrtigable
crusaders,Their
livesand
their contribution
to
our
work
are
a
power{ulinspiration
of
what
individuals
do.
As
webring this
issue
of
the ANletter
to
youwefeel
bothchallenged and sobered
at
the
terrain
that
lies
ahead.
As
readersvou
have
in
thepast
parlneredwith
us
withvour
contributions,
responses,
and
crifique,
and
we
look forward
to
pickng
up
the
threads
of
that relationship. Your feedbackto
us
on
the
ANletter
would
be
invaluable.
K
T
Suresh
You
are
welcome
to
reprOduce/translate anyof
the
malerialin
this newsletter
Please
credit us
approprately
and
send
us
a
copy
ofthe
repr0duced material
f0r
our
nformation
The
vews
expressed n thearticles
are
those ofthe
authOrs
and
not
necessarily
of
the
publishers
 
For
better
prospects
-
a
workshop
to
reviewthepathof
tourism
in
Kerala
The
decade
oftourism
in
KeralaKerala
hasshown
a
growinginterest
in
tourism
in the
lasl
decadeTourism is
seenas
one ofthe most important
foreignexchange earners
and as an instrument
for
economic
growth
and
development
lt
is
trying
to
supplement
the'industry
starved' status
of
the state bytourism
development.
lt
is
estimated
that
between
1
996-99,
there has
been
an investment
of
Rs.
400 crore
f
rom
various
financial institutions into
the
tourism
sector. lt
is
envisaged
by
the
state
that such investments
and those
from the
privatesector,
while
developing tourism,
wouldalso contributeto thegeneral
infrastructure
development
of the
state
The state
also anticipates
that it
would
be able tosupplementthe
diminishing
repatriations
f
romthe
Gulf
through
tourism
development
Recently,
the
National
Planning
Commissionhad remarked
that tourism is theonly
dynamic
activity
in
the
state
in
terms
of
privateinvestments
The
investments
from
the central
as
well
as
the state
budgets also
show
an upward
trend
The
current
state budgetary
figures fortourism
stand
at Rs.36
crore.While
these
ambitious
goals
are
visualized
and
attempts
made
torealisethem, thestate
policydocuments
andplannersare clear
that they want
to
avoid
the
pitfalls
of the
earlier
unplanned
t0urism
development.
There
are increasing apprehensions
from
-J
he
workshop
'Kerala
Exploring
Futtre
Frontiers
in
Tourism Dcvelopment'orgonised
by
Department
of'
Tottrism,
Kerala,
and
EQLIATIOIVS,
attemptecl at
revieu'ing
lhe
planning pntcess
o.f
touristn
in
the state
and including
the
diflerent
stakeholder.s.The
process,drawingfront
globnl
experient:es
like
the
Commission
for
Sustainable
Development
d'
the
LIN, was
an
efJbrt
at
lookingJor
:
strstaintrble
and
eqttitable options in
totrt'ism.
the
peopleat
tourism
destinations that theyare being left out
from the
debate and
the
benefits and
they now
demandthecreation
of
structures
that
would
ensure
theiroarticioation
in
tourism
development.Fromthemacrolo the
micro
It
has been
realised
globally
that the
presence
of
multiplestakeholders
has
to
be
acknowledged
for
smooth
functioning
of
tourismactivity.TheUnited Nations
Commission for
Sustainable Developmentcan
be
seen as an
outcome
of
the
need
to
include
the
variousstakeholders
in the
planning
processes
Attempts at regulation, for theproper
functioning
of
tourism,
is
onwiththe
WTO-OMT
(World
Tourism
0rganisation)preparing
'TheCode
of
Ethics'
Thoughwithpitfalls,this
isanindicationof the fact that theglobalbodies
do
realise
that
many
ofthe
practices
in
tourism as
it
is
conducted
today
are
unethical
The
philosophy
ofdecentralisation
of
planning
is
not
new
to
Kerala.
The
People'sPlanprocessinitiated in
1
996
has ensured that thepanchayatsaregivenan
impoftant
space in the designing ofthedevelopmentpattern
of
their
areas
This is
not
to
say
that
all
is fine with
the
People's Planprocess.
But
it
certainly
allows thought
on
ensuring
representation
from
various
sections ofthesocletyindeciding the
f
uture.
EQUATI0NS,
ANLetterVol
7
No
'l
November 2000

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