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Expectancy Violations Theory_Simplified

Expectancy Violations Theory_Simplified

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Published by: Rajesh Cheemalakonda on Mar 06, 2011
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09/21/2011

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CHAPTER
5
EXPECTANCY
VI
ALAilON'S
T
I]
EO
RYOutline
L
Personal
space
expectations: conform or deviate?
A.
Judee
Burgoon
definespersonalspace
as
the
invisible,variable volume
of
space
surrounding
an
individual
that
defines
that
individual's
preferreddistance
from
others,
1.
Thesize
and
shape
of
our
personalspacedepends upon
cultural
norms
and
individual
preferences.
2.
Personal
space
is
always
a
compromisebetween
the
conflicting
approach-
avoidance
needs
that
we
ashumans
have
for
affiliation
and
privacy.
B.
Edward Hall
coined the
term
proxemics
to
refer
to the
study
of
people'suse
of
spaceas a
special elaboration ofculture.
1.
He
believed
that
most
spatial
interpretation
is
outside our
awareness,
2.
He
believed that Americans
have
fourproxemic
zones.
.a,
lntimate
distance:
0
to
1Binches.
b,
Personal
distance:
1Binches
to
4
feet.
c.
Socialdistance:
4
to
1O
feet.
d.
Public
distance:
1O
feet
to
infinity.
3.
He
maintained
that
effective
communicators
adjust their
nonverbal behaviortoconform to the communicative rules
of
their
partners.
C.
Burgoonsuggests
that,
under
some
circumstances,
violating
social
norms
and
personalexpectations
isa
superior strategy
to
conforrnity.
ll.
An
applied
test
of the original
model.
A.
According
to
Burgoon's earlymodel,crossingover
the
"threatthreshold"that
forms
the
boundary of
the
intimate distance causes
physical
andpsychologicaldiscomfort.
B.
Noticeable deviations
from
what we expect cause
a
heightened
state of
arousal
and
spur
us
to
review
the nature of our relationship with a
person.
C.
A
person
with
"punishing"powershouldobserveproxemicconventions
or
standslightly
farther
away
than
expected.
D,
An
attractive communicatorbenefitsfrom
a close
approach.
E.
Burgoon'soriginaltheory was
not
supported
by
her
research,
but
she has continued
to
refine her approach to
expectancy
violations.
lll,
A
convoluted model becomes an elegant
theory.
A.
Burgoon
dropped the concept
ofthe
threat
threshold.
B.
Shehas
substituted"an
orienting response"
or
a mental"alertness"
for
"arousal,"
C.
Arousal
is no
longer
a
necessary
link
between
expectancy
violation
and
communication
outcomes
such
as
attraction, credibility,
persuasion,
and
involvement, but rather
a
side effect of apartner'sdeviation.
D,
To demonstrate
her
interest
ina
broad range
of
variables,
shehas
dropped
the
qua
lifier
"nonverba
1.
"
63
 
lV.
Core
concepts
of
EVT
(expectancy
violations
theory).
A.
EVT
offers
a
soft determinismrather
than
hard-coreuniversal
laws.
B.
Burgoon
does,
however,
hope
to
link
surprising
interpersonal
behavior
and
attraction,credibility, influence,and involvement.
C,
Expectancy.
1.
Expectancyis
basedoncontext, relationship,and communicatorcharacteristics.
2.
Burgoon believes
that
all
cultures
have
a
similar
structure
of
expectedcommunicationbehavior,but thatthe contextofthoseexpectationsdiffers.
D.
Violation
valence,
1.
The
violationvalence
is
the
positive
or
negative
value
we
place
on
theunexpectedbehavior, regardlessof
who
does
it.
2.
lf
thevalence
is
negative,do
less
than
expected.
3.
lf thevalence
is
positive,do
more
than
expected.
4,
Although
the
meanings
of
most violationscan
be
determinedfromcontext,
some
nonverbal
expectancy
violations
are
truly
equivocal,
5.
For
equivocal violations,
one
mustrefer
tothe
communicatorreward
valence,
E.
Communicator reward
valence.
1.
The
communicator
rewardvalence
is the
sum
of
the
positive
and
negative
attributes
that the
person
brings
to the
encounterplus
the
potentialhe or
shehas
to
reward orpunish
in
the future.
V.
Critique:
a
work
inprogress.
A.
Burgoonconcedes
that
we
can't
yet
use
EW
to
generatespecific
predictionsregarding
touch
outcomes
and
calls
for further
descriptive
work
before applyingthetheory
to
any
nonverbal
behavior.
B.
Sheis
particularly
troubled
by
two
of
EW's shortcomings.
1,
EVT
does
not
fullyaccount
forthe
overwhelming prevalence
of
reciprocity
that
has
been
found
ininterpersonal interactions.
2.
EVT
does
not
indicatewhether
communicator
valence
or
behavior
valencedominateswhen the twoareincongruent.
C.
Despite
these
problems,Burgoon's
theorymeets four
of the
fivecriteria
fora
good
scientifictheory,
and
recentresearchsuggests improvement
in the
fifth
criterion,prediction.
KeyNames
and
Terms
Judee
Burgoon
A
theorist from the
University
of
Arizona who
developed
expectancy
violations
theory.
PersonalSpace
The
invisible, variable volume
of
space surrounding
an
individual
that
defines
that
individual'spreferreddistance fromothers.
Edward
Hall
An
anthropologist
from
the
lllinois lnstitute
of
Technology
who
coined
the
term
proxemics.ProxemicsThe
study
of
people's
use
of space
as a
special elaboration of culture.
64

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