Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
32Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
CAE ADVANCED SAMPLAE PAPER 1

CAE ADVANCED SAMPLAE PAPER 1

Ratings:

4.67

(3)
|Views: 2,633|Likes:
Published by Kris

More info:

Published by: Kris on Aug 24, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/30/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CAMBRIDGE
EXAMINATIONS, CERTIFICATES & DIPLOMAS
English as aForeign Language
CAE
CERTIFICATEINADVANCEDENGLISHPAPER 1
 S  A  M P  P  A  P  R  S 
 
Page 2
2
0150/1 S96
For questions
1–17
, answer by choosing from the list (
A
 – 
G
) on the right below.Some of the choices may be required more than once.Note: When more than one answer is required, these may be given
in any order
.
Of which series of books are the following stated?
The tone of one of its guides is too serious.
1
...........One of its guides has been greatly improved.
2
...........Its guides give ratings to places.
3
...........The market for its guides is expanding.
4
...........
5
...........Its guides adopt a new approach to design.
6
...........
7
...........One of its guides is generally considered aclassic.
8
...........Some of its guides are written by newwriters.
9
...........Its guides convey a sense of the pleasuresof travelling.
10
...........There are not many guides in this series.
11
...........Its guides are accused of having anundesirable effect.
12
...........
13
...........Its guides are particularly good for peoplewho have never been to the area before.
14
...........The quality of writing in its guides ishigher than in any of the others.
15
...........Important facts are missing from all ofits guides.
16
...........It includes the guide which best describesthe atmosphere of the Caribbean.
17
...........
Remember to put your answers on the separate answer sheet.A
Lonely Planet
B
Rough Guide
C
Cadogan
D
Trade and Travel
E
Michelin
F
Access
G
EverymanAnswer questions
1–17
by referring to the newspaper article about travel guide books on page
3
.Indicate your answers
on the separate answer sheet
.
FIRSTTEXT/QUESTIONS 1–17
PAPER 1 READING SAMPLE PAPER
 
Page 3
I
have this problem withguide books. I read toomany hurriedly (usually ona plane) and then forgetthem and my debt to them.When I’m travelling, I soon learnwhich to reach for first (perhapsthe safest indicator of which isbest). But a few countries later Ihave forgotten perhaps not which Ichose, but almost certainly why.Good ones are the kick-start forthe experience, rather than theexperience itself.So, drawing up a shortlist of the best guide book series seemeda touch high-handed – especiallywhen you add the vagaries of theseries to the equation, for eventhe best produces its share of hopeless volumes.What turned it into the confidentwork of minutes rather than daysof agonising was a simple and,once I had thought of it, obvioustest. All that was necessary wasto imagine I was going some-whereI knew absolutely nothingabout and ask myself what guidebooks I would look at first. Theefficacy of this ploy was suchthat, when I asked a few otherpeople to do the same, it came asno surprise to find that we werein almost total agreement.The first two were the easiest.Without any question my firststop would be the
 Lonely Planet
and the
 Rough Guide
series. Icouldn’t, and wouldn’t, choosebetween them in advance. Thereis more between titles within theseries than there is between theseries themselves. If bothcovered my destinations (as theyusually do), I would want themboth in my hand luggage.Both are practical and tell youthe things you really want toknow (such as where to get agood cheap meal, and the bus toyour next destination). Bothstarted with the young backpackerin mind, and both are nowbroadening their target readershipto include the more affluent 30-plus reader.The
 R
 ough Guides
, perhapsthe more even of the two series,tend to be stronger on Europe andthe cultural background, and themore obsessed with what is nowtermed political correctness (yetthey rarely have anything to dowith politics).The
 Lonely Planets
areusually stronger east of Suez, andcapture the sheer joy of travellingsomewhat better. Neither objectto the generalisation that the
 Rough Guides
are travels bywriters, whereas their Australianrivals are written by travellers.To complain, as criticsoccasionally have, that theseguides are guilty of attracting toomany people to unspoiled spots,is to miss the point. It proves thatboth series are good guide books.The
 Rough Guide
empireemergedfrom unpromising be-ginnings. The very first one,written 10 years ago, was thebook on Greece its young authorswanted, but couldn’t find. It hadmany defects not worth dwellingon now (the current edition isexcellent), but for similar reasonsI was slow to appreciate the valueof the
Cadogan
series. Its Greek volume, by its most prolificauthor, is widely admired. But Ihave rarely found it worthconsulting.It was not until a recent trawlof Caribbean islands that I foundthe
Cadogan
volume was the oneI was reaching for first. It was theone which really captured the‘feel’of the islands. It also hadreliable recommendations.Further investigation revealedthe series to be the best-written of all, with a record of bringing onpromising young writers, as wellas capturing such establishedstars as Michael Haag, whose
 Egypt
it has just published.
 Prague
,
 New York
,
 Portugal 
and
 Morocco
are particularly goodtitles.The best book for adestination depends on thedestination and you, as well as onthe book itself. For instance, the
Caribbean I 
s
lands Handbook
from the dourly named
Trade and Travel Publications
had alsoaccompanied me around theCaribbean. This comes from thesame stable as the
South American Handbook
, now in its70th edition, and widely held tobe the greatest guide book of alltime.For erudition and encyclopedicscope, the
South American
volume is without equal. But,though not without a certain wryhumour (and on occasionsa barely suppressed joy atunearthing arcane information),one wishes it would allow itself to be outrageously subjectiveonce in a while. This probablyexplains why it was rarely thefirst I reached for. The Caribbeanis a place for colour and gutreactions, rather than deadpanassessment.The
 Michelin
green guides aregood value and manage thebalancing act between opinionand solid information to per-fection. Michelin’s star system(from three for ‘worth the journey’ downwards) tells thenewcomer to a region exactlywhat and where its priorities are,and is the best aid to planning anitinerary from scratch that Iknow. There is nothing onrestaurants and hotels, of course,and the red guides with which thegreen mesh ingeniously, thoughexcellent works of reference intheir way, do not entirely fillthe gap. Michelin is no goodon atmosphere – or people.Personally, they interest me morethan buildings and museums.The future almost certainlylies with more graphically adv-enturous guides. Among thosewarranting honourable mentionare the
 Access
series onAmerican and European cities,with its user-friendly layout, andthe stunning artwork of the new,and few,
 Everyman
guides,which are literally a joy to hold.In this video age, it will no longerbe enough to tell people how touse the buses. You need to showthem the ticket machines, too
.
0150/1/S96
3
Travel Companions
 Mark Ottaway looks at the best travel guide books available
[Turn over

Activity (32)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
RoSzBEMADI liked this
deepheat_008 liked this
Milena S. liked this
Ana Maracic liked this
Irene Vassileva liked this
Takuya Tokimasa liked this
omaraje liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->