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Deputy Postmaster General Job Description

Deputy Postmaster General Job Description

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Published by Ed O'Keefe
A headhunter is helping the US Postal Service find its next #2 official. Here's the job description.
A headhunter is helping the US Postal Service find its next #2 official. Here's the job description.

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Published by: Ed O'Keefe on Mar 06, 2011
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03/06/2011

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Confidential:
This document and the information contained within is confidential and is provided to the named recipient. Thisinformation has been prepared in good faith by Spencer Stuart but may require future verification or correction. Distribution or reproduction of this document and/or its contents is strictly prohibited.
POSITION AND CANDIDATE SPECIFICATION
 
UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE
 
DEPUTY POSTMASTER GENERAL
 Prepared by: Leslie HortumAssignment: 61639-006Date: January 2011
 
USPSJanuary 2011Page 1
POSITION SPECIFICATION
 
About the United States Postal Service (USPS)
In the more than two centuries since Benjamin Franklin was appointed our first Postmaster General in 1775, the USPS has grown and changed with America, boldly embracing new technologies to better serve a growing population.A self-supporting government enterprise, the USPS is the only delivery service that reachesevery address in the nation  150 million residences, businesses and Post Office boxes. TheUSPS receives no tax dollars. With 36,000 retail locations and the most frequently visitedwebsite in the federal government, the USPS relies on the sale of postage, products andservices to pay for operating expenses. The USPS is wholly owned by the government andcontrolled by US Presidential appointees (the Board of Governors) and the Postmaster General(who is appointed by the Board of Governors).Named the
Most Trusted Government Agency 
for five consecutive years and the sixth
Most Trusted Business
in the nation by the Ponemon Institute, the USPS has annual revenue of morethan $68 billion and delivers nearly half the world’s mail. If it were a private sector company, theUSPS would rank 28th in the 2009 Fortune 500. In the 2009 Global Fortune 500 list, the USPSranked 84th.The USPS is the core of the trillion dollar mailing industry that employs more than 8 millionpeople. It employs roughly 700,000, making the mail service the second largest civilianemployer in the country, second to Wal-Mart but ahead of McDonald's, and the fourth largestcivilian employer in the world.These classes of mail brought in most of the $68 billion in revenue in 2009:First-Class Mail $35.9 billionAdvertising $17.4 billionShipping Services $8.1 billionPeriodicals $2 billionPackage Services $ 1.7 billion
Envisioning America's Future Postal Service
“Ensuring a Viable Postal Service for America,” the Postal Service action plan for the nextdecade, describes a flexible, agile Postal Service that can adapt to America’s changing mailinghabits and preferences. The USPS understands that to best serve the American people in 2020and beyond, it must be leaner and more able to quickly respond to customer mailing needs.The presentation in its entirety can be accessed at
http://www.usps.com/strategicplanning/_pdf/ActionPlanfortheFuture_March2010.pdf.
 
USPSJanuary 2011Page 2
Financial Information
The USPS faces a number of financial challenges due to the combined effects of the economicrecession, increased use of electronic communications, and its legislatively-mandated obligationto prepay Retiree Health Benefits.In the face of these financial challenges, the USPS has responded aggressively, saving over $1billion every year since 2001, including $6.1 billion savings in 2009 alone. A loss of more than$7 billion is projected for 2010, and with current trends expected to worsen over the decade, theUSPS will be pushed more deeply into crisis. Without fundamental change through legal,legislative, and regulatory action, cumulative losses could reach more than $238 billion by 2020.To avoid potential insolvency, the USPS has developed an ambitious but achievable plan,taking steps allowed under current law to reduce the projected gap by $123 billion. Thesesavings would be unprecedented, even by the standards set over the last several years; andeven if its plan was to succeed in every action that present legislation allows, the USPS wouldstill face unsustainable losses of at least $115 billion by 2020.The remaining gap can be closed, and the USPS can continue to fulfill its mission at no cost toAmerican taxpayers, but only with additional flexibility that would have to come throughlegislative changes.
Legislative & Regulatory Priorities
The USPS will work with Congress to address the prepayment of retiree health benefits, changefrequency of delivery, and restructure price caps mandated by the
Postal Act of 2006 
.Restructuring prepayment of retiree health benefits and changing delivery frequency provide thegreatest costs savings opportunities. These two changes could reduce cumulative costs by asmuch as $90 billion by 2020.The following bullets provide specifics on each of the legislative priorities:
 
Restructuring Retiree Health Benefits Prefunding
 
Restructure retiree health benefits payments to “pay-as-you-go,” comparable to what isused by the rest of the federal government and the private sector. This will add anaverage of $5.6 billion in cash flow every year.
 
Adjusting Delivery Frequency
 
Adjust delivery days to better reflect current and anticipated volumes and changing patterns in customer use. Survey data show that the public favors 5-day delivery over using taxpayer funds and other alternatives. In FY 2000, $1.80 in revenue wasgenerated per delivery stop daily, based on six days of delivery. In FY 2009, $1.40 inrevenue was generated per delivery stop. That number is expected to drop to $1 by 2020. Under current law, the Postal Service cannot determine the number of days todeliver mail, regardless of costs or declining revenue.

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