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Lazarus (1993) From Psychological Stress to the Emotions

Lazarus (1993) From Psychological Stress to the Emotions

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Annu. Rev. Psychol. 1993.44:1-22. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.orgby EMORY UNIVERSITY on 06/28/05. For personal use only.
 
Annu.
Rev.Psychol.1993.44:1 21
Copyright
©1993by
AnnualReviews
Inc. All
rights reserved
FROMPSYCHOLOGICALSTRESS TOTHEEMOTIONS"A History ofChangingOutlooks
R. S. Lazarus
Departmentof Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, California
94720KEYWORDS:
psychological stress, emotion, relational meaning,core relational themes,appraisal,coping
CONTENTS
EARLYAPPROACHESTOSTRESS.....................................................................................2 THECOGNITIVEMEDIATIONALAPPROACH:APPRAISAL.........................................5 COPINGWITHSTRESS..........................................................................................................8 REGARDINGSTRESSASA SUBSETOFTHEEMOTIONS..............................................10 A COGNITIVE-MOTIVATIONAL-RELATIONALTHEORYOF EMOTION....................12
RelationalMeaning:
CoreRelationalThemes..................................................... 13
TheSeparateAppraisalComponents
...................................................................
14
Coping
andEmotion
.............................................................................................
16FINALTHOUGHTS.................................................................................................................17
Researchscholars are productsof their times but their workalso changesthe wayscientific issues are studiedafter them.This reciprocalinfluence between the outlook of a period and the research people do has been particularlyevident in the study of psychologicalstress andthe emotionsduringthe period of myacademiclife frompost-WorldWarII to the present. In pursuingissues about stress and the emotionsthat have been of particular interest to me,historical shifts of great momentare revealed, whichI intend to highlight inthis essay.1
0066-4308/93/0201-0001$02.00
Annu. Rev. Psychol. 1993.44:1-22. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.orgby EMORY UNIVERSITY on 06/28/05. For personal use only.
 
2 LAZARUS
EARLY APPROACHESTO STRESS
The term stress, meaninghardship or adversity, can be found--thoughwithouta programmaticfocus--at least as early as the 14th century (Lumsden1981).It first seems to have achieved technical importance, however, in the 17thcentury in the work of the prominentphysicist-biologist, Robert Hooke(seeHinkle 1973). Hooke was concerned with how man-madestructures, such asbridges, must be designed to carry heavy loads and resist buffeting by winds,earthquakes, and other natural forces that could destroy them.
Load
referred toa weight on a structure,
stress
was the area over whichthe load impinged,and
strain
was the deformation of the structure created by the interplay of bothload and stress.Althoughthese usages have changed somewhatin the transition from phys-ics to other disciplines, Hooke’sanalysis greatly influenced early 20th centurymodels of stress in physiology, psychology, and sociology. The theme thatsurvives in moderntimes is the idea of stress as an external load or demandona biological, social, or psychologicalsystem.During WordWarII there was considerable interest in emotional break-downin response to the "stresses" of combat(e.g. Grinker & Spiegel 1945).The emphasis on the psychodynamicsof breakdown--referred to as "battlefatigue" or "war neurosis"--is itself historically noteworthy,becausein WorldWarI the perspective had been neurological rather than psychological; theWorld WarI term for breakdownwas "shell shock," which expressed a vaguebut erroneous notion that the dysfunction resulted from brain damagecreatedby the sound of explodingshells.After World WarII it became evident that manyconditions of ordinarylife--for example, marriage, growing up, facing school exams, and beingill---could produceeffects comparableto those of combat. This led to a grow-ing interest in stress as a cause of humandistress and dysfunction. The domi-nant model--parallel with Hooke’sanalysis--was basically that of input (loador demandon systems) and output (strain, deformation, breakdown).The mainepistemology of the Americanacademic psychology of those days, namely,behaviorism and positivism, madethis type of modelappear scientific andstraightforward, thoughit turned out to be insufficient.WhenI appeared on the scene, the discipline’s interest in stress--presum-ably an esoteric topic--was modest, and the concept had not yet been appliedto the moreordinary conditions of daily life. The military wantedto knowhow to select menwhowouldbe stress resistant, and to train themto managestress. The major research questions of the immediately post-World WarII periodcentered on the effects of stress and howthey could be explained and pre-dicted. The research style was experimental, reflecting the widely acceptedview at the time that the most dependablewayto obtain knowledgewas in the laboratory.
Annu. Rev. Psychol. 1993.44:1-22. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.orgby EMORY UNIVERSITY on 06/28/05. For personal use only.

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