Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
China’s Overseas Chinese Policy 1970s

China’s Overseas Chinese Policy 1970s

Ratings:

4.5

(4)
|Views: 747|Likes:
Published by ilamont
China’s Emerging Overseas Chinese Policy in the Late 1970s and Implications for Ethnic Chinese Communities in Vietnam and Kampuchea. A research paper for Chinese Emigration in Modern Times (Hist E-1834, Harvard Extension School, Professor Philip Kuhn). By Ian Lamont, Harvard Extension School, ALM '08. http://harvardextended.com
China’s Emerging Overseas Chinese Policy in the Late 1970s and Implications for Ethnic Chinese Communities in Vietnam and Kampuchea. A research paper for Chinese Emigration in Modern Times (Hist E-1834, Harvard Extension School, Professor Philip Kuhn). By Ian Lamont, Harvard Extension School, ALM '08. http://harvardextended.com

More info:

Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: ilamont on Aug 25, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/09/2014

pdf

 
China’s Emerging Overseas Chinese Policy in the Late 1970sand Implications for Ethnic Chinese Communities in Vietnam and Kampuchea
Ian LamontALM CandidateMay 17, 2005ilamont@fas.harvard.edu
Hist E-1834Chinese Emigration in Modern TimesProfessor Philip KuhnSpring 2005
 
1
China’s modern policies toward overseas Chinese are rooted in the changes thataffected the country in the late 1970s. The death of Chairman Mao Zedong and the shiftaway from the leftist policies of the Cultural Revolution resulted the revival of officialbodies concerned with overseas Chinese, and strongly worded new policies thatproclaimed solidarity, friendship, and support with ethnic Chinese everywhere.But were the new overseas Chinese policies implemented in an even manner? For two Southeast Asian countries in the late 1970s, the answer is no. During this period, thePeople’s Republic of China treated the persecution of ethnic Chinese in Vietnam andKampuchea (Cambodia) quite differently. China excoriated Vietnam for its persecution of its large ethnic Chinese community, while never mentioning the killing of hundreds of thousands of Chinese in Kampuchea.Beijing’s divergent policies regarding overseas Chinese in Vietnam and Kampucheahave been noted before, not only by Western scholars but also by Vietnamese officialswho used the issue as a lever in bilateral negotiations with China at the time. Westernresearch and Vietnamese and Chinese primary sources are helpful in understandingBeijing’s overseas Chinese policy, but they are not supported by empirical evidencebeyond population and data relating to refugees. Is there any other way to measure thePRC’s overseas Chinese policy? I believe there is, by employing a computer-assistedevaluation of coverage of the two countries by China’s official state run media outlet, theXinhua News Agency, specifically its English-language service.Manual and automated content analysis of media sources has been a staple of media studies and international relations for decades. The study of history, however,tends to view mass media in a different light. Old media content is often evaluated asindividual primary sources — a news article about the
Titanic 
, an essay by Zhou Enlai, arunaway slave advertisement by Thomas Jefferson — but are seldom examined inaggregate. This is beginning to change, as news media are distributed electronically.
 
2
Print media content is often stored in databases, and after a few decades passes fromthe realm of current affairs into historical record. These electronic resources are easilysearchable, and can be parsed with software tools that can reveal patterns not readilyapparent in selective manual sampling of old media.It is my belief that a structured, computer-assisted analysis of the electronic archivesof the Xinhua General Overseas News Service from the late 1970s can help us better understand China’s emerging overseas Chinese policy, and the extent to which it wasupheld in dealings with Kampuchea and Vietnam. My content analysis of Xinhua will beaugmented by more traditional historical methods of research, including references toindividual Xinhua news items. I will also cite scholarly literature on the PRC’s overseasChinese policy, the nature of Chinese mass media and Xinhua’s English wire service,trilateral relations between China, Vietnam, and Kampuchea.
Overseas Chinese Communities in Vietnam and Kampuchea
In the mid to late 1970s, Vietnam and Kampuchea were similar in several respects,besides their proximity in mainland Southeast Asia. Both countries had sizable Chinesecommunities, numbering between 430,000 and 450,000 in Kampuchea in 1975, and 1.2million in Vietnam. Marxist governments ruled both countries — Kampuchea by theradical Communist movement known as the Khmer Rouge, and Vietnam by aCommunist government that had forcibly united North and South Vietnam in April 1975after a long civil war. Additionally, both the Khmer Rouge and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam actively persecuted ethnic Chinese living within their respective areas of controlin the mid to late 1970s, resulting in the forced displacement of hundreds of thousandsof ethnic Chinese from each country and the deaths of an estimated 215,000Kampuchean ethnic Chinese
1
and approximately 30,000 ethnic Chinese from Vietnam.
2

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
balkon19 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->