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The Lacuna in Longus's "Daphnis and Chloe" in Large Print

The Lacuna in Longus's "Daphnis and Chloe" in Large Print

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Published by LongusSophista
The English text of the great lacuna in Longus's novel, 'Daphnis and Chloe,' in the translation of the Athenian Society. London, 1896
The English text of the great lacuna in Longus's novel, 'Daphnis and Chloe,' in the translation of the Athenian Society. London, 1896

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Published by: LongusSophista on Aug 25, 2008
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05/09/2014

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Page 1 of 5 – The Lacuna in Longus’s
 Daphnis and Chloe
translated into English
AppendixThe following fragment, which fills up the hiatus in thenarrative indicated by the asterisks on page 14, was discovered byP. L. Courier, in 1809, in the Laurentian Library at Florence (seeIntroduction).* * * And Daphnis, standing by the spring, began to wash hishair and his whole person. His hair was dark and thick, and hisbody tanned by the sun; one would have thought that it wasdarkened by the reflection of his hair. Chloe looked at him, and heseemed to her to be very handsome: and, because she had never thought him handsome before, she imagined that he owed hisbeauty to his bath. She washed his back and shoulders, and,finding his skin soft and yielding beneath her hand, (336>) (154>)she more than once secretly touched herself, to see whether her own skin was more delicate. Then, as it was near sunset, theydrove back their flocks to the homestead: and, from that moment,Chloe had but one thought, one desire - to see Daphnis in the bathagain.The following day, when they returned to the pasture,Daphnis sat down under his favourite oak-tree and played on hispipe, looking awhile at his goats, which, lying at his feet, seemedto be listening to his strains. Chloe, seated near him, was alsolooking after her sheep, but her eyes were more frequently fixedupon Daphnis. She again thought him handsome as he wasplaying on his pipe, and this time, imagining that he owed hisbeauty to the music, she took the pipe herself, to see whether she
Source:
 Longus Literally and Completely Translated from the Greek 
, Athens, 1896.Available in PDF & DjVu formats at The Open Archive (archive.org).25 August 2008 - 0:14:03 a8/p8
 
Page 2 of 5 – The Lacuna in Longus’s
 Daphnis and Chloe
translated into English
could make herself beautiful. She persuaded him to take a bathagain, saw him in the bath and touched him: then, on her wayhome, she again began to praise his beauty, and this praise wasthe beginning of love. She did not know what was the matter withher, being a young girl brought (337>) (155>) up in the country,who had never even heard anyone mention the name of Love. Buther heart was a prey to languor, she no longer had control over her eyes, and she often uttered the name of Daphnis. She ate little,could not sleep at night, and neglected her flock: by turns shelaughed and cried, slept and started up: her face was pale onemoment, and covered with blushes the next: a cow, stung by thegadfly, was not more uneasy than Chloe. Sometimes, when shewas quite alone, she talked to herself in the following strain:"I am ill, but I do not know the nature of my illness: I feelpain, but I am not wounded: I am sad, but I have lost none of mysheep. I am burning, although seated in the shade. The brambleshave often torn my flesh, but I did not weep: the bees have oftenstung me, but I ate my food. The evil which now gnaws my heartmust be sharper than all those. Daphnis is beautiful, but so arethe flowers: his pipe gives forth sweet notes, but so do thenightingales: but yet I care not for them. Would that I were hispipe, that I might receive (338>) (156) his breath! Would that Iwere one of his goats, that I might be tended by him! O cruelwater, that hast made Daphnis so beautiful, while I have washed inthee in vain! I perish, O beloved Nymphs, and you, too, refuse tosave the girl who has been brought up in your midst. When I amdead, who will crown you with garlands? Who will feed my poor sheep? Who will look after the noisy grasshopper, which I took so
Source:
 Longus Literally and Completely Translated from the Greek 
, Athens, 1896.Available in PDF & DjVu formats at The Open Archive (archive.org).25 August 2008 - 0:14:03 a8/p8
 
Page 3 of 5 – The Lacuna in Longus’s
 Daphnis and Chloe
translated into English
much trouble to catch, that it might send me to sleep, chirping infront of the grotto? But now Daphnis has robbed me of sleep, andthe grass-hopper chirps in vain."Such were the words she spoke in her suffering, seeking invain for the name of Love. But Dorcon, the herdsman who hadextricated Daphnis and the goat from the pit, a youth whose beardwas just beginning to grow, who knew the name of Love and whatit meant, had felt an affection for Chloe ever since that day, and, astime went on, his passion increased. Thinking little of Daphnis,whom he looked upon as a mere child, he resolved (339>) (157>)to gain his object, either by bribery or violence. He first made thempresents: to Daphnis he gave a rustic pipe, the nine reeds of whichwere fastened together with brass instead of wax, and to Chloe aspotted fawn's skin, such as Bacchus was wont to wear. Then,thinking that he was on sufficiently friendly terms with them, hegradually began to neglect Daphnis, while every day he broughtChloe a fresh cheese, a garland of flowers, or some ripe fruit; andonce he presented her with a young calf, a gilt cup, and someyoung birds, which he had caught on the mountains. She,knowing nothing of the arts of lovers, was delighted to receive thepresents, because she could pass them on to Daphnis. One day,since Daphnis also was destined to learn what Love meant, adiscussion arose between him and Dorcon as to which of themwas the handsomer. Chloe was appointed judge: and the victor'sreward was to be a kiss. Dorcon spoke first:"I am taller than Daphnis: I am a cowherd, while he is only agoatherd, as much (340>) (158>) superior to him as cows are
Source:
 Longus Literally and Completely Translated from the Greek 
, Athens, 1896.Available in PDF & DjVu formats at The Open Archive (archive.org).25 August 2008 - 0:14:03 a8/p8

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