Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
THROUGH NAVAJO EYES: Sol Worth: Chapter12

THROUGH NAVAJO EYES: Sol Worth: Chapter12

Ratings: (0)|Views: 234|Likes:
Published by nu_01001110
Sol Worth book in several chapters, from http://astro.temple.edu/~ruby/wava/worth/worth.html
Sol Worth book in several chapters, from http://astro.temple.edu/~ruby/wava/worth/worth.html

More info:

Published by: nu_01001110 on Mar 08, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

03/08/2011

pdf

text

original

 
Chapter
12
“They
Handle
the
Equipment
Like
Pros”
Not only were there differences between our way and the Nava-
jos’
in the act of filming and of learning, and the choice of subjectsand actors in the films, but there were also differences in theirhandling of the physical equipment, materials, and processesinvolved in filmmaking. We found what seemed to be a remarka-ble difference in the way they actually worked with machinessuch as splicers, rewinds and viewers. They worked
so
muchfaster than we did and with such certainty about what they weredoing that we often thought that they were cutting film apart andjoining pieces at random. For those who have never worked withfilm, a short description of a filmmaker’s editing routine mighthelp to make clear the distinctions we are discussing.When the rushes (the film as
it
comes from the processinglaboratory) arrive, the filmmaker normally views them in projec-tion on a large screen at the proper speed at least three or fourtimes. He tries to note which cademes he likes, which cademes
 
“They Handle the Equipment
Like
Pros”
191
are unusable (out of focus, overexposed, or spoiled in some way),and which cademes might have some special quality.He then looks at the film
on
a table viewer where he can slowor speed the film through easily. He may make notes of whatcademes are
on
each roll or about how he intends to use eachcademe. He may cut out the bad shots that he noted duringprojection.After all his cademe footage is assembled-after the entire filmis shot-he cuts up the film cademe by cademe and puts togethera “rough cut,” a string of cademes in rough sequential order. Hedoesn’t worry about exact length of edeme, or about the exactplace he will cut. He will often have two or three edemes of thesame thing, because he isn’t sure which one to use, or which onewill go best with other edemes in a final sequence. Like thepainter who tries to cover his canvas
so
as to get a feel for thewhole thing at the start, the filmmaker makes his rough cut to seehow the film might look
if
it
were all on one reel. He knows thathe will make many changes later. He deliberately does not try todecide the exact point of a cut, but leaves extra film
on
eachedeme
so
it can be cut
off
later.When his entire film is assembled in rough cut-at this point
it
is often twice as long as
it
will be in
a
finished version-hebegins pruning the almost final edemes. Cademes or pieces
of
cademe are discarded, and he begins working to find the exactpoints at which to join two pieces of film. Whether working
on
a Moviola or a simple viewer, he goes through
a
long process ofrunning the film back and forth, back and forth, deciding
on
theexact frame in each cademe that will join with the next to formhis final edeme.An editing room presents
a
scene of intent decision making asthe editor winds the film back and forth, over and over, decidingthe precise frame of the cademe to cut on. A class of beginnersworking on their viewers and rewinds looks almost like a ballet,with arms turning one way and then the other in rhythmicmovements. When the splice for the “fine cut” is finally made, the
 
192
Through
Navajo Eyes
editor usually will run
it
through several times to check it andoften redo
it
because he is dissatisfied with the result. For exam-ple, in a sequence showing
a
man walking, the cut between a longshot and a close-up of the feet may not look smooth enough-themovement of the leg may jump or hesitate if the foot in the longshot is not exactly in the same place as on the close-up.When the Navajo began editing, their pattern of activity wasquite different. They seemed to spend no time at all looking attheir rushes. One viewing on the projector seemed enough.While observing Susie
at
the viewer, we felt as
if
she wasn’tlooking at the image at all. She would wind the film through theviewer and casually take her hands off the rewinds to take holdof the film. When one lets go of the rewinds while it is turning,it continues to turn, moving the film through the viewer. Wecarefully stop the rewind-and the film in the viewer-at thecorrect frame and mark the film with a grease pencil
so
that wecan cut
at
the right place. Susie would allow the film to continuerunning slowly and would take hold of the strip as it camethrough the viewer, lift it up, take her scissors, and cut the film
at
some point apparently without looking-all in one smooth,continuous, and uninterrupted motion.We (the investigators) were certain that her behavior meantthat cutting on
approximately
the right frame was all that Susiewas interested in. We could think of no way to ask questionsabout it and, at one point, Worth walked over as Susie used thescissors, grabbed the ends of the film, and asked Susie to describethe point at which she had cut. Susie calmly described the exactframe. We did this several times, and each time Susie describedthe frame-finally smiling as she did
so,
knowing that we wereplaying a game at which she obviously excelled. At this point inthe project, Worth recorded in his notes that Chalfen seemedanxious and competitive with the Navajo. He asked Chalfen whatwas going on, and Chalfen replied, “How do you expect me tofeel? These guys seem to be editing better than I do.”If the students were not cutting
at
random, which at that point

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->