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THROUGH NAVAJO EYES: Introduction

THROUGH NAVAJO EYES: Introduction

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Published by nu_01001110
Sol Worth book in several chapters, from http://astro.temple.edu/~ruby/wava/worth/worth.html
Sol Worth book in several chapters, from http://astro.temple.edu/~ruby/wava/worth/worth.html

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Published by: nu_01001110 on Mar 08, 2011
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10/14/2011

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THROUGH
NAVAJOEYES
An Exploration in Film Communication and Anthropology
 
Readers interested
in
renting the
films
discussed
in
this
book
should contact the Film Depart-ment, Museum
of
Modern Art,
I I
West
~3rd
Street, New
York,
N.Y.
10019.
This informa-tion supplants that given
on
p.
8
of
the Intro-duction.
 
Introduction
We wish to tell how we went about answering the question,What would happen
if
someone with
a
culture that makes anduses motion pictures taught people who had never made or usedmotion pictures to do
so
for the first time? Would they use thecameras and editing equipment
at
all?
If they did, what wouldthey make movies about and how would they go about it? Thisbook reports the outcome of such an endeavor among someNavajo Indians living in the Southwestern United States.One of the places we visited in a preliminary trip was PineSprings, Arizona, where, twenty-five years before, John Adairhad done one of his first studies on Navajo silversmiths.When we arrived in Pine Springs, Adair sought out an oldfriend, Sam Yazzie, who was one of the leading medicinemen inthe area. We wanted to tell Sam about our plan to teach Navajosto use motion picture cameras and to enlist his support for theproject. Sam was, at the time of our visit, about eighty years oldand had just returned from a government hospital after
a
severebout with chronic tuberculosis.We were told that Sam was in his hogan, and after wanderingthrough several muddy tracks that proved to be wrong turns, wefound his house. It was an apparently new square log cabin in aclearing next to a more traditional hogan, which we found outlater he used only for sings (the traditional Navajo curing cere-monies). As we entered the dim interior and waited
a
moment for

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