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Georgia Wing Encampment I - 2010

Georgia Wing Encampment I - 2010

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Published by CAP History Library
Civil Air Patrol
Civil Air Patrol

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Categories:Types, Research, Genealogy
Published by: CAP History Library on Mar 09, 2011
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03/16/2014

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Encampment Guide
Heat StressConditionsMap of Ft Gordon
2
 
3
SET UP
4567
Plans forTomorrow
Safe TipsMedical Advice
89
In the SpotlightMeet the Staff 
1011
Inside this issue: 
 
GAWG 2010 HONOR ENCAMPMENT
GEORGIA WING2010 SUMMERENCAMPMENT
 
The CAP Nat’l website ishttp://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/The GAWG website ishttp://www.GAWG.cap.gov/
With Captain Raquel AyalaEncampment Training Officer 
Captain Ayala has been a member of the CivilAir Patrol since December 1999, and has neverlet her membership expire. Currently, CaptainAyala is in the United States Air Force servingas a C-130 Structure Engineer at WarnerRobins Air Force Base.Before her accomplishments as a SeniorMember, Captain Ayala was a former EarhartCadet in New York Wing, a graduate in theHonor Flight at Cadet Officer School, and aDrill Team Commander for South East GroupNYWG.Captain Ayala has been instrumental increating a power-packed week of training forboth Basic Cadets and Staff. She is an integralpart of the GAWG Summer Honor Encamp-ment.Her goals for Cadet Staff are to surpass theircurrent leadership abilities and to demonstrateto the Basic Cadets what it means to be anoutstanding CAP Cadet.
 
Her goals for Basic Cadets are to be a spongeand to absorb all the information taught, andwork toward mirroring the outstandingleadership performance demonstrated byCadet and Senior Staff Her vision is to achieve these goals is throughteamwork. Quoting TSgt Adam Pope, USAFPararescueman: “TEAMWORK IS AGROUP OF INDIVIDUALS WORKINGTOGETHER TO ACHIEVE A COMMONGOAL WHILE SETTING ASIDE ALLPERSONAL GOALS AND DESIRES FOR THAT TEAM.”
26 & 27June2010
CadetCommanderC/Col Brian C. MauldinCadetDeputyCommanderC/Maj Casey AlvordEncampmentCommanderLt Col WayneRoshavenExecutiveOfficerLt Col Jim CardCommandantOf CadetsMajor Jim Flaviani
 
Page 2 Encampment Guide
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
As temperatures rise, the exposure to the Summer elements may result in related mishaps. It is imperative thatwe increase awareness of heat related injuries and their cause. We must keep our members safe and alert as they participate in all CAP activities.Operations involving high ambient temperatures and high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects (i.e.aircraft or vehicles), or strenuous physical activities have a high potential for inducing heat stress and heat re-lated injuries in people engaged in such operations.CAUSAL FACTORSAge, weight, degree of physical fitness, degree of acclimatization, metabolism, medications,medical conditions, type of clothing worn, and prior heat injuries.HEAT STROKEWhen the body’s system of temperature regulation fails and the body temperature rises to critical levels. This isa MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Primary signs are confusion, irrational behavior, loss of consciousness, convul-sions, lack of sweating, hot and dry skin, and an abnormally high body temperature. OBTAIN PROFES-SIONAL MEDICAL TREATMENT IMMEDIATELY.HEAT EXHAUSTIONPrimary signs are sweating, headache, nausea, vertigo, weakness, thirst, and giddiness. REMOVE PERSONFROM HOT ENVIRONMENT, GIVE FLUID REPLACEMENT, AND ENCOURAGE REST. SINCE SIGNSARE SIMILAR TO HEAT STROKE, HAVE TRAINED MEDICAL PERSON CHECK THE PERSON SUF-FERING FROM HEAT EXHAUSTION.HEAT CRAMPSHeat cramps, which have been attributed to an electrolyte imbalance, are usually caused by performing hard physical labor in a hot environment. Cramps can be caused by both too much and too little salt. Do not rely onthirst alone. WATER MUST BE TAKEN EVERY 15 TO 20 MINUTES IN HOT ENVIRONMENTS.HEAT COLLAPSE (Fainting)To prevent heat collapse, a person should gradually become acclimated to the hot environment. It is causedwhen the brain does not receive enough oxygen because blood pools in the extremities.HEAT RASHESUsually appears in areas where the clothing is restrictive. Occurs in areas which are persistently wetted by un-evaporated sweat. Normally disappears when affected individual returns to a cool environment.HEAT FATIGUEThe signs and symptoms are impaired performance of skilled sensorimotor, mental, or vigilance jobs. There isno treatment other than removal of the heat stress before a more serious heat-related condition develops.
ADJUSTING ACTIVITY SCHEDULES IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDEDTO PREVENT UNNECESSARY EXPOSURE TO HEAT.
WITH PROLONGED EXPOSURE AND/OR PHYSICAL ACTIVITYCaution—Fatigue PossibleExtreme Caution—Sunstroke, muscle cramps, heat exhaustion possibleDanger—Sunstroke, muscle cramps, heat exhaustion likelyExtreme Danger—Heat stroke or sunstroke highly likely
 
 
Page 3 Encampment Guide
 NOTE:#1 FORT GORDON BASE THEATER 25TH STREET AND BARNES AVENUE#2 BARTON FIELDFOR GRADUATION PARADE

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