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Medication Safety Survey

Medication Safety Survey

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Medication safety is of critical importance to patient safety. As frontline nurses play a vital role in ensuring medication safety, this survey of nurses presented by HarrisInteractive and McKesson gives critical insight into the current state of patient safety.
Medication safety is of critical importance to patient safety. As frontline nurses play a vital role in ensuring medication safety, this survey of nurses presented by HarrisInteractive and McKesson gives critical insight into the current state of patient safety.

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Published by: McKesson Corporation on Aug 25, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/16/2009

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FRON T LIN E N U RS E S P E RCE P T ION SOF T H E S TAT E OF PAT IE N T S A FE T
Executive SummaryJune 2005
S P ON S ORE D BS U RVE Y CON D U CT E D B
 
NTRODUCTION 
 The safety of the nation’s healthcare system has become front and center in nationaldiscussions.Headlines about avoidable medical errors are commonplace,promptinglegislative and regulatory action.National organizations have launched campaigns toimprove safety,such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI) 100,000 LivesCampaign.The Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report on medical errors,“To Err is Human:Building a Safer Health System,”helped to fuel this patient safety movement.The reportestimated that up to 98,000 patients die each year from medical errors – a shocking statisticand identified more than 7,000 of those deaths as specifically due to medication errors. The issue of medication safety is of vital importance to the frontline nurse:the registerednurse who delivers bedside care.The nurse plays a critical role in preventing medicationerrors,often acting as the safety net for the patient.As such,frontline nurses have areal-world view into patient and medication safety practices in their organizations. To capture the unique perspective of the frontline nurse,McKesson commissioned HarrisInteractive to conduct a national research study to better understand nurses’perceptions of patient safety and as a subset,medication safety.The participants were unaware thatMcKesson sponsored the research,and no disclosure of participant or organization identity has been made to McKesson.
Page 2Copyright © 2005 Harris Interactive and McKesson Corporation
 
Copyright © 2005 Harris Interactive and McKesson CorporationPage 3
M
ETHODOLOGY 
In spring 2005,McKesson commissioned Harris Interactive to conduct a national researchstudy in order to gain a better understanding of frontline nurses’attitudes toward patientsafety and medication safety. The online survey was conducted in April 2005 with 216 frontline registered nurses havingat least five years’experience.All respondents currently provide direct patient care in a U.S.hospital with 125 or more beds.The nurses work in general medical,general surgical,intensive care,critical care or step-down units.Forty-one percent have at least 20 years of experience,and 59 percent are 45 or older.Twenty-four percent work in hospitals with 125to 200 beds,45 percent in hospitals with 201 to 400 beds,and 31 percent in hospitals withmore than 400 beds.Data were not weighted and therefore reflect only the sample of nurses surveyed.Thoughthis online sample is not a probability sample,in theory,with probability samples of thissize,Harris Interactive estimates with 90 percent certainty that the overall results have asampling error of plus or minus 5 percentage points of what theywould be if the entirepopulationof registered nurses with at least fiveyears of experience who workin directpatient care at U.S.acute-care hospitals with 125 or more beds had been polled.Samplingerror for the sub-sample results of nurses who believe medication safety has improved intheir hospital over the last five years (156) and nurses who feel there are times whenmedication errors are more likely to occur (189) is higher and varies. Thereareother possible sources of error in all polls or surveys that are probably moreserious than theoretical calculations of sampling error.They include refusals to beinterviewed (non-response),question wording and question order,interviewer bias, weighting by demographic control data,and screening.It is impossible to quantify theerrors that may result from these factors.

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