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Do A

Do A

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Direction of Arrival Estimation1 Introduction
We have seen that there is a one-to-one relationship between the direction of a signal and theassociated received steering vector. It should therefore be possible to invert the relationship andestimate the direction of a signal from the received signals. An antenna array therefore shouldbe able to provide for
direction of arrival estimation 
. We have also seen that there is a Fourierrelationship between the beam pattern and the excitation at the array. This allows the directionof arrival (DOA) estimation problem to be treated as equivalent to
spectral estimation 
.
φ
1
φ
2
φ
3
Figure 1: The DOA estimation problem.The problem set up is shown in Fig. 1. Several (
) signals impinge on a linear, equispaced,array with
elements, each with direction
φ
i
. The goal of DOA estimation is to use the datareceived at the array to estimate
φ
i
, i
= 1
,...M 
. It is generally assumed that
M <
, thoughthere exist approaches (such as maximum likelihood estimation) that do not place this constraint.In practice, the estimation is made difficult by the fact that there are usually an unknownnumber of signals impinging on the array simultaneously, each from unknown directions and withunknown amplitudes. Also, the received signals are always corrupted by noise. Nevertheless, thereare several methods to estimate the number of signals and their directions. Figure 2 shows someof these several spectral estimation [1] techniques
1
. Note that this is
not 
an exhaustive list.This chapter is organized as follows. We begin by determining the Cramer-Rao bound, thetheoretical limit on how well the directions of arrival can be estimated. We then look at methodsto estimates the directions assuming we know the number of incoming signals. We will only describe5 techniques: correlation, Maximum Likelihood, MUSIC, ESPRIT and Matrix Pencil. Finally we
1
I would like to acknowledge the contributions of Prof. Alex Gershman, Dept. of Elec. and Comp. Engg.,McMaster University, for this figure [1]
1
 
Figure 2:
Some
of the several approaches to spectral estimationlook at two methods to estimate the number of signals.
2 The Cramer-Rao Bound
We begin by realizing that the DOA is a parameter estimated from the received data. The minimumvariance in this estimate is given by the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB).The CRB theorem: Given a length-
vector of received signals
x
dependent on a set of 
parameters
θ
= [
θ
1
, θ
2
, ..., θ
]
, corrupted by additive noise,
x
=
v
(
θ
) +
n
,
(1)where
v
(
θ
) is a
known 
function of the parameters, the variance of an unbiased estimate of the
p
-thparameter,
θ
p
, is greater than the Cramer Rao boundvar(
θ
p
)
J
1
pp
,
(2)where
J
1
pp
is the
p
-th diagonal entry of the
inverse
of the Fisher information matrix
J
whose (
i,j
)
th
is given by
J
ij
= E
∂ 
2
∂θ
i
∂θ
j
[ln
X
(
x
/
θ
)]
,
(3)where,
X
(
x
/
θ
) is the pdf of the received vector given the parameters
θ
and E
{·}
representsstatistical expectation.The CRB tells us that estimating parameters from noisy data will necessarily result in noisyestimates. Furthermore, the CRB is the best we can possibly do in minimizing the residual noise inunbiased estimates. Also, due to the fact that the minimum variance is dependent on the inverse2
 
of the Fisher information matrix, we cannot ignore parameters that we are not interested in. Thevector
θ
must include
all 
parameters in the model for
v
.
2.1 CRB for DOA Estimation
As shown in Fig. 1, the model under consideration is a number of signals impinging at the array,corrupted by white noise. We will derive the CRB for a single signal corrupted by noise (
= 1).The data model is therefore
x
=
α
s
(
φ
) +
n
,
(4)where
s
(
φ
) represents the steering vector of the signal whose direction (
φ
) we are attempting toestimate. The noise vector
n
is zero-mean Gaussian with covariance
σ
2
I
. Note that, even thoughwe are not interested in the amplitude, there are
two
unknown parameters,
α
and
φ
. Here
α
and
φ
are modelled as an unknown, but deterministic, constants, i.e., E
{
x
}
=
α
s
(
φ
). In CRBliterature,
α
would be considered a nuisance parameter, which must be accounted for because it isunknown. Finally,
α
itself represents two unknowns, its real and imaginary parts, or equivalentlyits magnitude and phase. Let
α
=
ae
jb
. Therefore,
θ
= [
a, b, φ
]
. In our case,
v
(
θ
) =
α
s
(
φ
)
,
(5)
X
(
x
/
θ
) =
Ce
(
x
v
)
H
R
1
(
x
v
)
,
(6)where
R
=
σ
2
I
and
is a normalization constant.
ln
X
(
x
/
θ
) = ln
(
x
v
)
(
x
v
)
σ
2
(7)= ln
+
x
x
+
v
x
+
x
v
v
v
σ
2
,
(8)= ln
+
x
x
+
α
s
(
φ
)
x
+
α
x
s
(
φ
)
|
α
|
2
s
(
φ
)
s
(
φ
)
σ
2
.
(9)Note that the first two terms in this final equation are constant with respect to the parameters
θ
i
.Since we are interested in taking derivatives of this expression, we can ignore these terms. Focusingon the important terms and writing the result in terms of the parameters
θ
= [
a, b, φ
]
,
g
(
θ
) =1
σ
2
ae
jb
s
(
φ
)
x
+
ae
jb
x
s
(
φ
)
a
2
s
(
φ
)
s
(
φ
)
.
(10)Also,
J
= E
∂ 
2
g∂a
2
∂ 
2
g∂a∂b∂ 
2
g∂a∂φ∂ 
2
g∂b∂a∂ 
2
g∂b
2
∂ 
2
g∂b∂φ∂ 
2
g∂φ∂a∂ 
2
g∂φ∂b∂ 
2
g∂φ
2
.
(11)3

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