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Soviet Weapon-System Acquisition

Soviet Weapon-System Acquisition

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Published by John Greenewald
[91 Pages, 6.1MB] - The Soviet Union has built the largest peacetime military establishment in history, a force whose size dwarfs any military establishment in the West. Only the combined efforts of the collective Western alliance can approach the Soviets' armament effort. The Soviet Union, in support of its military goals, has dedicated a larger share of its natural and industrial resources year after year to the production of military weapons than has any other country in peacetime. Research was undertaken to ascertain if the Soviet methodology of transitioning a weapon into production and subsequent manufacturing management differed significantly from United States practice and, if so, whether there were aspects of the Soviet methodology that could be usefully applied in managing U.S. weapons in the production/engineering and deployment to manufacturing stages. The document also reviews Soviet policies for logistical support of equipment.
[91 Pages, 6.1MB] - The Soviet Union has built the largest peacetime military establishment in history, a force whose size dwarfs any military establishment in the West. Only the combined efforts of the collective Western alliance can approach the Soviets' armament effort. The Soviet Union, in support of its military goals, has dedicated a larger share of its natural and industrial resources year after year to the production of military weapons than has any other country in peacetime. Research was undertaken to ascertain if the Soviet methodology of transitioning a weapon into production and subsequent manufacturing management differed significantly from United States practice and, if so, whether there were aspects of the Soviet methodology that could be usefully applied in managing U.S. weapons in the production/engineering and deployment to manufacturing stages. The document also reviews Soviet policies for logistical support of equipment.

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Published by: John Greenewald on Mar 15, 2011
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05/21/2012

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AD-165
________24---_1-1_65
If
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11011IB
16
EngineeringDepartment
tIHII!I~lI1I~h'!ilIIl
I
September
1991
NavalWeaponsCenter,
China
Lake,
CA93555-6001
Approvedfor
public
release;
distribution
is
unlimited.
S91
10
4163
 
FOREWORD
The book
was
researched
and written
by
James
H. Irvine,
a
member
of
the
FleetEngineering Division's Systems
Management Office
at
the Naval
Weapons Center.
The
Office, under
the
direction
of
George
F.
Barker,
is
responsible for transitioningnewly
developed conventional
weapons into
production. Theresearch
was
undertaken-
to
ascertain
if
the
Soviet
methodology
of
transitioning
a
weapon
into production
and
subsequent manufacturingmanagement differed significantlyfrom
U.S.
practice
and,
if
so,
whether
there
were
aspects
of
the
Soviet
methodology
that
could
be
usefully
applied
in
managing
U.S.
weapons
inthe
production-engineering
and
deployment-to-manufacturingstages.
At
the
request
of
Chris
R.
Peterson, Head
of
the
Fleet Engineering
Division,
the
study was expanded
.o cover
Soviet
policiesforlogistical support
of
equipment.
At
the time
of
this
book's
publication,
the
political
and
economic structure
of
the
Soviet
Union
and the
Warsaw
Pact
is
undergoing
fundamental change.Institutions
oncesacrosanct
are
being
modified
and even abandoned; and-conceptsonce foreignto
the
Soviet
i
culture-free
and
openpoliticaldebate,
a
market economy, genuine
democracy-are
now
matters
of
common
public discussion
and may
in
fact
become
political
realities.
Nevertheless,
the
armed forces
of
the
Soviet
Union
remain
today
one
of
the
most
powerful
i
military
entities
in the
world. As with every aspect
of
Soviet society,
the
organizationalinfrastructure
throughwhich
Soviet
military forcesconceive, design,test, and field
-their
-
military
equipmentcannot remain
unaffected
by the
winds
of
change.
It
is
likely,
however,
that
this will
be
a
change
of
degree, rather than
of
kind. While the emphasis
on
the
production
of
military goodsrelative
to
that
of
consumer
goodsmayshift,and the-number
of
rubles
channeled into
the
nation's
war machine may
dwindle,
theway
in which
the
military
equipsitself
for
battle
is
unlikely
to be
substantially
altered.
The research
was
conducted
from
1987 to 1990
using only
unclassified,
publicly
available
sources.All
conclusions, projections,
and
opinions contained
herein
are
the
author's (except
where
otherwise
noted) and
do
not
necessarily
reflect
the
views
of
the
Naval Weapons
Center,
the
Department
of
the
Navy,
or
the
Department
of
Defense.
It
is
the
author's hope that, through
an
examination
of
the
Soviet's acquisition
system,
the
reader
may gain
a
betterunderstanding
of
that
nation's-military capabilities
and
may
also
I
develop
a
new
perspective
on the
strengths
and
weaknesses
of
our
own acquisition system.
Released
by Under
authority
of
i
M.
E.
ANDERSON,
Head
W.B.
PORTER
Engineering
Department
Technical-Director
4
September
1991
Administrative
Publication
409
I
Published
by
...................................................
TechnicalInformationDepartment
Collation
...........................................................................
Covers,
44
leaves
I
First
printing
...............................................................................
350 copies
I
I

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