Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
FDR-Papers-1933-4

FDR-Papers-1933-4

Ratings: (0)|Views: 22|Likes:
Published by ncwazzy
These docs will show the Bankruptcy of the United States
These docs will show the Bankruptcy of the United States

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: ncwazzy on Mar 16, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/14/2011

pdf

text

original

 
Creation
of
Civil
Works
Administration
1
55
A
4
Executive
Order
No.
6
4
2oB
Which
Was
Accompanied
by
Preceding Statement.
November
9,
1933
BYVIRTUE
of
the
authority
vested
in
me
under
Title II
of
theNational
Industrial
Recovery
Act
of
June
16,
1933
(Public
No.
67,
7
3
d Congress),
and
for
the
purpose
of
increasing
employmentquickly:
(1)
I
hereby
establish
a
Federal Civil Works
Administration,
and
appoint
as
Administrator
thereof
the
Federal
Emergency
Re-
lief
Administrator,
as
an
agency to
administer
a
program
of
public
works
as
a
part
of,
and
to be
included
in,
the
comprehen-
sive
program
under preparation
by
the
Federal
Emergency Ad-
ministration
of
Public
Works,
which
program
shall be
approved
by
the
Federal
Emergency
Administrator
of
Public
Works
and
shall
be
known
as
the
"civil works
program."
(2)
The
Federal
Emergency
Relief
Administrator,
as
the
head
of
the Federal
Civil
Works
Administration,
is
authorized
to
con-
struct,
finance,
or
aid
in
the
construction or
financing
of
any
public-works
project included
in
the
civil
works
program
and
to acquire
by
purchase
any
real
or
personal
property
in
connec-
tionwith
the
accomplishment
of
anysuch
project and
to
lease
any
such
property
withor
without
the privilege
of
purchase.
(3)
The
said
Administrator
is
further
authorized
to
appoint
without
regard
to
the
civil
service
laws
or
the
Classification
Act
of
1923,
as
amended, and
fix
the
compensation
of
such
officers,
experts,
and
employees,
and
prescribe
their
dutiesand
authority
and
make such
expenditures(including expenditures
for personal
services
and
rent
at
the
seat
of
government and
elsewhere,
for
law books
and
books of
reference,
and
for
paper,
binding,
and
printing),
as
maybe
necessary
to
carry
out
the
purposes
of
theFederal
CivilWorks
Administration
and,
with the
consent
of
the
State
or
municipality
concerned,
may
utilize
such
State and
local
officers
and
employees
as
he may
deem
necessary.
456
HeinOnline -- 2 Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt 364 1938
 
Creation
of
Civil
Works
Administration
(4)
For
the
purposes ofthis
order,
there
is
herebyallocated
to
the FederalCivilWorks
Administration
the sum
of
$400,000,000
out
of
the
appropriation
of$3,3oo,ooo,ooo
authorized
by
Section
22o
of
the
National
Industrial
RecoveryAct
and
made
by
the
Fourth
Deficiency
Act,
fiscal
year
1933,
approved
June
16,
1933
(Public
No.
77,
73
d
Congress).
NOTE:
The
purposes
and
objec-
tives
of
the
CivilWorks
Administra-tion(popularly
known
as
C.W.A.)were
toprovide
some
4,000,000
un-
employedpersons
with
short-termemploymenton
small
public
works
projects
during
the
winter months
of
1933-1934.
I
decided
to
initiate
this
program
at
thistime
for a
number
of
rea-
sons:
Relief
needs
continued
withincreasing
seriousness
as
the wintermonths
came
on.
The
sharp
busi-
ness
revival
of
the
summer
monthshad
ceased;
and,indeed,
a
reaction
had
set
in.
The
relief rolls
which
had
declinedsharplyfrom
March,
1933,
hadbegun
to
rise
again
in
October,
1933.
The
Public
Works
Administration
(P.W.A.)
had
not
been able
by
that
time
to
commence
a
very
extensive
program
of
largepublic
worksbecause
of
the
una-
voidable
time-consuming
process
of
planning,
designing
and
reviewing
projects, clearing
up
legal
matters,
advertising
for
bids
and
letting
con-
tracts.
The
local
work
relief
activi-
ties
being
financed
byF.E.R.A.,
State,
and
local
funds
were too often
concerned
with
projects
of
little
or
no
value,
were
almost
exclusively
undertaken
by
unskilled
manual
labor
and
were
generally
of
low
efficiency.
I
came
to
the
conclusion
that
by
shifting to
this
new C.W.A.
pro-
gram
1,500,000
people
employed
in
local
work
relief
activities,
and
other
employableswho
were
thenon
di-
rectrelief,
a
great
quantity
of
pur-
chasing
power could
be
injected
into
the
economic
system
in
a
short
time;
that
the
direct relief rolls
would
be
greatly
reduced;
and
thatadequate
wages
for
useful
projects
would
be
substituted
for
inadequate
pay
on
work
of
little
value.
C.W.A.
was
to
establish
minimum hourly
rates
of
pay;
but
was
to
pay
pre-vailing
rates where
prevailingrates
exceeded
the
minimum,although
thehours
of
work
in
such
cases
would
be
limited.
Accordingly,
by
means
of
the
fore-
going
Executive
Order,
issued
pur-
suant
to
Title
II
of
the
NationalIndustrial
Recovery Act,
I
created
the
CivilWorks
Administration.
(See
also
Press
Conference
of
No-vember
3,
1933,
Item
151,
this
vol-
ume.)
Its
organization
and
operation
was
essentially differentfrom
that
of
the F.E.R.A.
The
F.E.R.A.
was
mostly
a
State
and
local
program,
457
HeinOnline -- 2 Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt 365 1938
 
Creation
of
Civil
Works
Administration
loosely
supervised
and
in part
fi-
nanced
by
the Federal Government,
but
actuallyadministered
and
ex-
ercised
locally.
The
C.W.A.
was,however,completely
operated,
and
90
percent
financed
by
the
Federal
Government.
The
head
of
it
was
the
Civil Works
Administration
in
Washington;
and
its
authority
was
exercised
through
its
subdivisions,
the
State,
county
and
city
C.W.A.s.
All
of
the State Civil Works
Admin-istrations,
however, were
appointed
by
theFederal
Administrator,and
were
actually
sworn
Federal
officials.
In
many
cases,
the
State
emer-
gency
relief
administratorsand
their
staffs
were
appointed
as
new
C.W.A.
officials.
This
procedure
was
fol-
lowed
down
to
the
local
relief
ad-
ministrations;
and
in
this
way
manyexisting
facilities
and
agreat
deal
of
existingpersonnel
were
put
to
use
immediately,
so
that
work
could
be
begun
with
the
haste
which
was
so
essential.
The
program
was
officially
started
at
a
conference
of
C.W.A.
admin-
istrators
on
November
15,
1933,
at
which
I
made
aspeech,
printed
as
Item
161,
this
volume.
A
week
later
(November
22,
1933)
I publiclyurged all banks
promptly
to
cash
C.W.A.
checks
which
were
all
ready
to
be
issued.
At theend
of
that
week,
as
anindication
of
the
speed
with
which
the program
was
initiated,
checks
were
already
issued
to
814,511
workers
in
a
total
amount
of
more
than
$7,500,000.
By
the
end
of
Novembermore
than
1,500,000
persons
were
at
work
on
C.W.A.
projects,
and
during
the
week
ending
January
18,
1934,
the
C.W.A.
reached
its peak
of
4,263,-644
workers
earning
more
than
$64,-
ooo,ooo
per
week.
The
C.W.A.
was
not
designed
as
a
continuingprogram.
By
theend
of
March,
1934,
it
was
largely
termi-
nated,
despitewidespreadpressure
to
make
it
permanent.
During
its
brief
life
of
four
and
a
half
months,the
C.W.A.
operated
18o,ooo
work
projects
and
expended
over
$933,-
ooo,ooo,
of which
79.3
percent,or
more
than
$740,000,000,
went di-
rectly
into
wages
and
salaries
for
the
workers.
In
addition,
private
in-
dustry
had
benefited
by
the
pur-
chase
of
more
than
$115,000,000
worth
of
materials for
these
proj-
ects.
The
character
of C.W.A.'sphys-
ical
accomplishments
will be
dis-
cussed
later
in
a
summary
of
all
im-
provements
and
services
carriedout
by
relief
workers
in the
work
reliefprogram.
C.W.A.
was
relatively
costly,
when
compared
with
the
F.E.R.A.;
and
as
soon
as
its
prime
purpose
was
believed
to
have been
served,
it
was
abandoned
in
favor
of
a
work
relief
program
hiring
only
destitute
unemployed
on
a
budgetary
defi-
ciency basis.
The
step
was
taken
as
a
matter
of
economy.
A
discussion
of
the
work
relief program
which
followed
the
liquidation
of
C.W.A.
appears
in
Item
31
of
Volume
III.
In evaluating
the
benefits
of
C.W.A.
there must
be
taken
into
considerationthe
1933
necessity
for
458
HeinOnline -- 2 Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt 365 1938

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->