Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
A Walk in Space

A Walk in Space

Ratings: (0)|Views: 84 |Likes:
Published by Bob Andrepont

More info:

Published by: Bob Andrepont on Mar 18, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/09/2011

pdf

text

original

 
For sale
by
the Superintendent
of
Documents,
US.
Government Printing OfficeWashington, D.C.
20402
Price
30
Cents
 
On
June
3,
1965,
during the third revolution
of
an extended earth orbital mission in space by NASA’sGemini
4,
Astronauts James A. McDivitt and Edward H. White
I1
carried out the first Extravehicular Ac-tivity in the United States manned space flight program. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is the operationalterm for “walking in space,” or more properly, maneuvering in space by an astronaut outside the spacecraft.It is not a stunt. It is a basic technique required for the development of manned space flight capability.Future spacemen will leave their vehicles and maneuver in space to accomplish specific tasks vital totheir missions. This could include transferring from one vehicle to another, monitoring of the joining
of
onespacecraft to another (docking), making adjustments to the outside of the spacecraft, assembling a spacestation, making repairs
or
adjustments to
an
unmanned instrumented earth satellite.
In
the Gemini
4
EVA, Astronaut White left the spacecraft to walk in space; Command Pilot McDivittremained at the controls. White was outside Gemini for 21 minutes. He was photographed by a motionpicture camera fastened to the outside of Gemini
4,
and
by McDivitt. White
also
took pictures, including thefirst photograph ever taken of
a
spacecraft in space from a vantage point outside the spacecraft.In the early hours of the flight, prior to EVA, an effort was made to rendezvous Gemini
4
with theorbiting second stage
of
the Titan
I1
launch vehicle, which had placed the spacecraft
in
orbit. The necessarycontrol maneuvers were accomplished readily in Gemini, but the booster was in an orbit differing
so
muchfrom that of the spacecraft that a great deal of fuel was consumed controlling attitude to keep Titan’s Stage2 in sight and changing altitude in an attempt to match the booster’s orbit. Also, the booster was tumbling(turning end over end) which made it difficult to judge range and would have posed a hazard in a closeapproach.For these reasons, the rendezvous maneuver was discontinued. This insured having a sufficientamount of maneuvering gas for the long duration orbital flight.Gemini
4
was the second manned flight in Project Gemini, Flights
1
and 2 having been tests withoutastronauts aboard, In Gemini
3,
Astronauts Virgil
I.
Grissom and John W. Young made three orbits of theearth in
4
hours and
53
minutes, demonstrating manned orbital flight in the Gemini spacecraft and qualify-ing it for long duration missions. Gemini
4,
flown by Astronauts James A. McDivitt as command pilot, andAstronaut White as pilot, began at
11
:
16
a.m. EDT on June
3
from Cape Kennedy, Florida, proceededthrough
62
plus revolutions and ended with touchdown in the Atlantic Ocean
97
hours and
56
minutesafteqcthe launch. These, and flights
still
to come, are parts of
a
three-phase program for placing men
on
themoo&tpd returning them safely to earth before the end of this decade. Project Mercury was the first phase,in which:,techniques
of
manned orbital flight were developed. Project Gemini is the second phase, and thethird is Project Apollo, with the objective of lunar landings.Project G,emini has the mission
of
accomplishing orbital flights of long duration, of developing thetechniques of. maneuvering, including changes of orbit, and the joining of one spacecraft to another
(d~ckiiig).
Itqfc~&,i~,e$
&e
st.;&es
zf
ecpipme~t
fer
space
flight,
and
the
effect on men of space flight-including the effects of weightlessness.It is a continuation of astronaut training. And it includes theExtravehicular Activities mission, the stated purpose of which is “to experiment with astronauts leavingthe Gemini spacecraft while in orbit and determining their ability to perform extravehicular activities suchas mechanical or other type tasks.” This mission was begun with Astronaut White’s walk in space andfurther EVA missions are scheduled. Project Gemini has the additional mission of carrying into space aseries of experiments in space medicine, engineering and space sciences.The Manned Space Flight program is managed by NASA’s Manned Spacecraft Center at Houston,Texas, under the direction of the Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.
C.
/
\
1
I

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->