Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
IAEA Update on Japan Earthquake

IAEA Update on Japan Earthquake

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,406|Likes:
Published by mmemmott

More info:

Published by: mmemmott on Mar 19, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/19/2014

pdf

text

original

 
 
 
 
Top Stories & Features
19
March 2011
IAEA Update on Japan Earthquake
Staff Report
Story Resources
Videos: Work of the IEC: A Briefing for Director General Amano, 14 March 2011Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological EmergencyInternational Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES)
Japanese Earthquake Update (19 March 2011 12:00 UTC)
Contamination in Food Products around FukushimaThe Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has confirmed the presence of radioactive iodine contamination in food products measured in the Fukushima Prefecture, the area around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. According to the latest data, the food products were measured from 16-18 March and indicated the presence of radioactive iodine. To date, no other radioactive isotopes have been shown to increase in the analysis of food products around Fukushima.Though radioactive iodine has a short half-life of about 8 days and decays naturally within a matter of weeks, there is a short-term risk to human health if radioactive iodine in food is absorbed into the human body. If ingested, it can accumulate in and cause damage to the thyroid. Children and young people are particularly at risk of thyroid damage due to the ingestion of radioactive iodine. Japanese authorities have implemented two critical measures to counter the contamination of food products by radioactive iodine. First, on 16 March, Japan's Nuclear Safety Commission recommended local authorities to instruct evacuees leaving the 20-kilometre area to ingest stable
 
About Us
Who We Are
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IAEA Update on Japan Earthquake
 
Home
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html (1 of 22) [3/19/2011 8:30:24 AM]
Search IAEA.org
 
IAEA Update on Japan Earthquake
IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC)International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC)Response Assistance Network (RANET) Japan Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA)Listen to this story
(not radioactive) iodine. As an established method of prevention, the ingestion of stable iodine can help to prevent the accumulation of radioactive iodine in the thyroid. Stable iodine pills and syrup (for children) have been made available at evacuation centres. Second, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has ordered a stop to the sale of all food products from the Fukushima Prefecture.The IAEA has passed this information to the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) and will continue to report on this development.According to materials on its website, the FAO is prepared to respond upon request from the Government of Japan in the following areas:
 
- assessing radioactive contamination of the agricultural environment, especially foods
 
- providing technical advice and determining appropriate medium- and long-term measures for agriculture -- including soil, land, forests, crops, fisheries, animal health and welfare and food safety
 
- facilitating international trade of foods, including agricultural produceThe IAEA continues to gather information on this development and will report further as events warrant.
 
Japan Earthquake Update (19 March 2011, 4:30 UTC)
Summary of conditions at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plantLocated on the Eastern coast of Japan, the six nuclear power reactors at Daiichi are boiling water reactors (BWRs). A massive earthquake on 11 March severed off-site power to the plant and triggered the automatic shutdown of the three operating reactors - Units 1, 2, and 3. The control rods in those units were successfully inserted into the reactor cores, ending the fission chain reaction. The remaining reactors - Units 4, 5, and 6 -- had previously been shut down for routine maintenance purposes. Backup diesel generators, designed to start up after losing off-site power, began providing electricity to pumps circulating coolant to the six reactors.Soon after the earthquake, a large tsunami washed over the reactor site, knocking out the backup generators. While some batteries remained operable, the entire site lost the ability to maintain proper reactor cooling and water circulation functions.Here is the current status of the six reactors, based on documents and confirmed by Japanese officials (new information in bold):Unit 1Coolant within Unit 1 is covering about half of the fuel rods in the reactor, leading to fuel damage. High pressure within the reactor's containment led operators to vent gas from the containment. Later, an explosion destroyed the outer shell of the reactor building above the containment on 12 March.There are no indications of problems with either the reactor pressure vessel or the primary containment vessel. Efforts to pump seawater into the reactor core are continuing.
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html (2 of 22) [3/19/2011 8:30:24 AM]
 
IAEA Update on Japan Earthquake
On 18 March, Japan assigned an INES rating of 5 to this unit. Further information on the ratings and the INES scale. Unit 2Coolant within Unit 2 is covering about half of the fuel rods in the reactor, leading to fuel damage. Following an explosion on 15 March,  Japanese officials expressed concerns that the reactor's containment may not be fully intact. NISA officials reported on 18 March that white smoke continues to emerge from the building.Efforts to pump seawater into the reactor core are continuing.On 18 March, Japan assigned an INES rating of 5 to this unit.Unit 3Coolant within Unit 3 is covering about half of the fuel rods in the reactor, leading to fuel damage. High pressure within the reactor's containment led operators to vent gas from the containment. Later, an explosion destroyed the outer shell of the reactor building above the containment on 14 March.Following the explosion, Japanese officials expressed concerns that the reactor's containment may not be fully intact. NISA officials reported on 18 March that white smoke continues to emerge from the building.Efforts to pump seawater into the reactor core are continuing.Of additional concern at Unit 3 is the condition of the spent fuel pool in the building. There are indications that there is an inadequate cooling water level in the pool, and Japanese authorities have addressed the problem by dropping water from helicopters into the building and spraying water from trucks. On 18 March, Japanese Self Defence Forces used seven fire trucks to continue spraying efforts. There is no data on the temperature of the water in the pool.On 18 March, Japan assigned an INES rating of 5 to this unit.Unit 4All fuel had been removed from the reactor core for routine maintenance before the earthquake and placed into the spent fuel pool. A portion of the building's outer shell was damaged by the explosion at Unit 3 on 14 March, and there have been two reported fires - possibly including one in the spent fuel pool on 15 March -- that extinguished spontaneously, although smoke remained visible on 18 March.Authorities remain concerned about the condition of the spent fuel pool.On 18 March, Japan assigned an INES rating of 4 to this site.Unit 5 and 6Shut down before the earthquake, there are no immediate concerns about these reactors' cores or containment. Instrumentation from both spent fuel pools, however, has shown gradually increasing temperatures. Officials have configured two diesel generators at Unit 6 to power water circulation in the spent fuel pools and cores of Units 5 and 6.Workers have opened holes in the roofs of both buildings to prevent the possible accumulation of hydrogen, which is suspected of causing explosions at other units.
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html (3 of 22) [3/19/2011 8:30:24 AM]

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->