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Wisconsin Judge Whose Son is Affiliated With AFL-CIO & SEIU P-9

Wisconsin Judge Whose Son is Affiliated With AFL-CIO & SEIU P-9

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Published by LaborUnionReport
[From page nine] Maryann Sumi, an assistant attorney general and a Racine native, has been appointed by the governor to replace Judge Michael B. Torphy, who retired in June. Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson swore her in on September 4. Sumi will serve the eight months remaining in Torphy’s term and will likely seek election to a full, six-year term next April. She took the bench September 8. As a lawyer with the Department of Justice (DOJ) from 1976 through 1987, Sumi was known for her work in environmental law. She headed the Environmental Protection Unit at DOJ from 1980 to 1987, prosecuting a Lake Michigan water diversion case that went up to the U.S. Supreme Court. Sumi left DOJ and worked at the state Department of Natural Resources for a number of years before returning to work on civil litigation in March 1997. A 1976 graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School, Sumi earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is married to Carl A. Sinderbrand, a Madison attorney, and has three children: Jacob, Molly and Andrew.
[From page nine] Maryann Sumi, an assistant attorney general and a Racine native, has been appointed by the governor to replace Judge Michael B. Torphy, who retired in June. Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson swore her in on September 4. Sumi will serve the eight months remaining in Torphy’s term and will likely seek election to a full, six-year term next April. She took the bench September 8. As a lawyer with the Department of Justice (DOJ) from 1976 through 1987, Sumi was known for her work in environmental law. She headed the Environmental Protection Unit at DOJ from 1980 to 1987, prosecuting a Lake Michigan water diversion case that went up to the U.S. Supreme Court. Sumi left DOJ and worked at the state Department of Natural Resources for a number of years before returning to work on civil litigation in March 1997. A 1976 graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School, Sumi earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is married to Carl A. Sinderbrand, a Madison attorney, and has three children: Jacob, Molly and Andrew.

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Published by: LaborUnionReport on Mar 21, 2011
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BRUCE FRITZ
A PUBLICATION OF THE WISCONSIN JUDICIARYVol.6,No.4 www.courts.state.wi.us Fall 1998
The Third BranchThe Third Branch
T
he U.S. Department of Health and HumanServices has awarded more thanhalf a million dollars for athree-year permanency projectfor children in MilwaukeeCounty.The project was sched-uled to begin in early October.The Wisconsin SupremeCourt, through the Director of State Courts Office, submittedthe grant proposal to theAdministration for Childrenand Families requesting$511,200 to implement innov-ative case processing strategies in child abuse and neglect cases inMilwaukee County Children’s Court.The grant was developed as part of the Court ImprovementProgram, through the efforts of Project Director John Voelker,CHIPS Coordinator Michelle Jensen, Presiding Judge Thomas R.Cooper and the Milwaukee County Children’s Court staff.The proposal,entitled the Milwaukee Permanency Project,hasthree objectives:1.to facilitate collaboration between child welfare agencies and thecourt;2.to reduce the amount oftime between initial agency involvementwith a family, the execution of a termination of parental rights(TPR),where appropriate,and the finalization ofan adoption;and3.to test the effectiveness of mediation and other forms of alter-native dispute resolution in child welfare cases.The goals ofthe Milwaukee Permanency Project will be accom-plished by conducting training for professionals working inChildren’s Court,implementing an early identification process forcases that should be placed on a fast track and utilizing mediationat various points in the process.The grant proposal was undertaken as part of the WisconsinCourt Improvement Program, a statewide initiative designed toimprove the processing of child abuse and neglect cases inthe courts.
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Contact Michelle Jensen,Court Improvement Program Coordinator,at (608) 266-1557 for more information.
Milwaukee Receives $$$ to Improve CHIPS Processing
Federal dollars will help MilwaukeeChildren's Court improve itsprocessing ofcases involvingabused and neglected children.
D
avid Prosser, Jr., was the governor’s pick to replace JusticeJanine P. Geske on the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Theappointment came shortly before the Court began its term andProsser was sworn in just before hearing his first case. His termexpires July 31, 2001.Prosser’s first two weeks on the Court included eight oral argu-ments,two full days ofconference,two attorney discipline cases andhearings on two proposed rules amendments.In his spare time,he interviewed law clerk candidates and beganplanning a formal investiture ceremony.Clerk Beth E.Hanan,whoserved Geske for two years,agreed to stay on until Prosser selecteda replacement.Prosser just hired Attorney Allan M.Foeckler to behis law clerk.A Chicago native, Prosser was raised in Appleton and receivedhis bachelor’s degree from DePauw University in 1965 and his lawdegree from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1968.Before joining the Court, Prosser served on the Wisconsin TaxAppeals Commission where he conducted hearings and issueddecisions on a variety of disputes related to Wisconsin taxation.He was appointed to the Tax Appeals Commission following an18-year career in the Wisconsin Legislature,where he representedthe Appleton area in the Assembly from 1979 through 1996.During
Justice David Prosser, Jr., Adjusts to New Role
continued on page 15
Justice David Prosser,Jr.,took the oath ofoffice just one hour beforetaking the bench.
 
J
udge John J. DiMotto, MilwaukeeCounty Circuit Court, has been named“Trial Judge of the Year”by the WisconsinChapter of the American Board of TrialAdvocates (ABOTA).ABOTA is a national organization of civil trial attorneys whose membershipis split equally between lawyers whorepresent plaintiffs and lawyers who repre-sent defendants.The award is presented each year to amember ofthe Wisconsin judiciary“whose thorough preparation,breadth of knowledge of the law, decisive rulings and courtesy tolitigants,jurors and members ofthe bar have consistently advancedthe interest ofjustice and the dignity ofthe judicial process,accord-ing to James M.Fergal,chairman of the selection committee.DiMotto received the award at the summer meeting of theState Bar of Wisconsin. He selected Supreme Court Rule 62:
TheStandards ofCourtesy and Decorum
as the topic ofhisremarks.Winners of the award in past years are:Judges P.Charles Jones,James C. Eaton, Allan J. Deehr, N. Patrick Crooks, Robert W.Landry,Susan Steingass,George A.Burns,Jr.and James P.Fiedler.Of these past winners, Crooks, Eaton and Jones are stillactive judges.
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DiMotto Named Trial Judge of the Year
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udges in Racine hosted county boardsupervisors this summer as part of theJudicial Ride-Along Program.The program was begun in 1993 withjudges and legislators to improve the courts’relationship with the state Legislature.Theidea—originated in Minnesota—was tohave judges host their local legislators for aday on the bench to give a new perspectiveon the issues facing the courts.The Judicial Ride-Along Program was sosuccessful in Wisconsin that it was expandedto include county board supervisors severalyears ago. District court administrators,with help from the Director ofState CourtsOffice,match the judges with local supervi-sors, publicize the meetings with pressreleases and follow up with questionnaires.Judges Charles H. Constantine, DennisJ. Flynn, Richard J. Kreul, Wayne J. Marik,Emily S. Mueller, Gerald P. Ptacek, Allan“Pat” Torhorst and Emmanuel J.Vuvunas,and Family Court Commissioner KevinVanKampen,all participated.Ptacek, who handled a variety of felonyproceedings including a change of plea,anarraignment and a sentencing while thesupervisor sat next to him at the bench,called the experience “invaluable” andencouraged colleagues to take part.Kreul wrote that the program “hassubstantial value” and said the supervisorwho sat with him through a calendar of more than 60 trafficand misdemeanorcases “didn’t realizehow hard judgesworked or theirresponsibilities.”Sup. Russell A.Clark wrote thatTorhorst preparedhim well for his dayon the bench.“Before the firstcase the Judge explained to me how hiscourt worked, and also gave a brief sum-mary ofhow all the Judges and courts work.I was amazed with his professionalism inconducting his court.He was very down toearth,knowledgeable,and patient to all whocame in front of him in his court.”The supervisor wrote that the programshould be mandatory for all who sit on thecounty board. “It enables a person likemyselfto have a more rounded perspectiveof the problems that exist in our commu-nity and how we deal with them.That kindof insight is invaluable,he wrote.The Judicial Ride-Along Program willcommence again in late fall. Invitationswill go out to all new legislators afterthe election.
For more information,call Amanda K.Todd at (608) 264-6256.
Racine County Ride-AlongCalled ‘Invaluable’
Judge John J.DiMotto
The Third Branch
Chief Justice
Shirley S.Abrahamson
Director of State Courts
J.Denis Moran
Editor
Amanda K. Todd
Associate Editor
Karen Leone de Nie
Contributing Writers
Sam Shelton,Randy Sprouleand Jian Zhou
Editorial Committee
Hon.Michael J.Rosborough
Vernon County Circuit Court
Gregg T.Moore
District X Court Administrator
Gail Richardson
District V Court Administrator
Carolyn Olson
Iowa County Clerk of Circuit Court
The Third Branch
is a quarterly publica-tion of the Director of State CourtsOffice, providing news of interest to theWisconsin Judiciary.Send questions andcomments to: Amanda K. Todd, CourtInformation Officer, P.O. Box 1688,Madison, WI 53701-1688. Phone (608)264-6256. E-mail: atodd@itis.com
JudgeAllan “Pat”Torhorst
 
D
istrict Court Administrator Patrick G.Brummond became deputy directorfor court operations on September 8,replacing Kathleen M.Murphy who left thepost last summer.On September 21, Michael G. Neimon,deputy district court administrator inMilwaukee since 1991, was appointed toreplace Brummond in District III.Brummond had been the ThirdDistrict’s administrator for four years.The Third District is comprised of Jefferson, Ozaukee, Washington andWaukesha Counties.In addition to his administrative duties, Brummond helped todevelop and evaluate progress on the Information TechnologyStrategic Plan. He also has served on the VideoconferencingCommittee and has worked on other special projects such as the
Volunteers in the Courts
initiative and orientation for new clerks of circuit court.Prior to joining the Wisconsin court system in August 1994,Brummond was deputy judicial district administrator for the TenthJudicial District of Minnesota for four years. In that position, hemanaged a several million dollar budget in five program areas andworked on budget forecasting. His responsibilities also includedpersonnel management,policy development and implementationand case flow management.Brummond holds a master’s degree in judicial administrationfrom the University of Denver College of Law and a bachelor’sdegree in criminal justice from Morningside College in SiouxCity,Iowa.He and his wife,Kathy,and daughters Rachel,5,and Mary Kate,3,are eagerly anticipating their move to Madison.Neimon had been deputy district court administrator inMilwaukee for seven years.In that role,he assisted with budgeting,case and personnel management, long-range strategic planning,rotation of judges and facility/security issues.Neimon holds a master’s degree in public administration anda bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.He is a candidate for a fellowship with the Institute forCourt Management.Neimon and his wife, Kerry, a guidance counselor atOconomowoc School District, are expecting their first childin February.
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Brummond is New Deputy Director of State Courts;Neimon Assumes District III DCA PostNew PolicyAnalyst on Board
A
former policyanalyst for theWisconsin Divisionof Motor Vehicles(DMV) has beenhired as the courts’planning and policyanalyst.Daniel P.Wassink spent the last sixyears at the DMVwhere he mostrecently supervised26 staffers and led—or participated in—avariety of research and analysis projectsand strategic planning initiatives. Wassink also worked to assess the impact of legisla-tion on the DMV and helped legislators tocraft bills affecting the vehicle titling/regis-tration program.Prior to joining the DMV, Wassink wasa legislative assistant for the state Senate forthree years.He also covered the state Capitolfor WTDY radio in Madison.Wassink moved to Madison in 1985from Muskegon, Mich., where his parents,his sister and her family still reside.
y
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ean M.Bousquet,who becameinterim director of the court system’sCircuit CourtA u t o m a t i o nProgram (CCAP)after Richard L.“Rick” Godfrey’sdeparture on July17, has been madethe program’s permanent director.CCAP provides hardware and softwareto improve record keeping, calendaring,accounting and word processing inWisconsin’s circuit courts. It also providesongoing user support in the form of train-ing and help-desk work, and maintains allthe hardware and software it installs.CCAP has a staffof39 full-time employ-ees supplemented by contract programmersand limited-term employees. This staff supports 2,600 users in 70 locations.Bousquet joined CCAP in March 1993after spending four years as the area direc-tor ofresidential services for the Universityof Southern Maine.While in Maine she was also employedas the assistant clerk of courts for the U. S.District Court in Portland.Bousquet holds a bachelor’s degree injournalism from the University of Wisconsin and a master’s degree in publicpolicy and management from theUniversity of Southern Maine.She and her husband, a Dane Countydeputy sheriff,have two young sons.Teaming up with Bousquet is formerCCAP staffer Ken McKelvey, who wasbrought back to be deputy director for tech-nical operations.McKelvey worked for CCAP from 1990to 1994 before leaving to become a softwaredevelopment consultant. As a consultant,he worked to develop CCAP software pro-grams,designed and implemented the website, designed and developed the courtinformation repository and coordinatedthe network security study.McKelvey has a bachelor’s degree incomputer science from the University of Wisconsin-Platteville.
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Bousquet is New CCAP Director;McKelvey Promoted to Deputy Spot
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District CourtAdministratorMichael G. NeimonDaniel P.WassinkJean M.Bousquet

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