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Racial Categorization in the 2010 Census- U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

Racial Categorization in the 2010 Census- U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

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Published by woodstockwoody
"From the beginning, the census implicitly recognized three race categories: white, black, and Indian.
It was only following the passage of the 14th Amendment (requiring the counting of “the whole number of persons” rather than “free persons”) that the census became a true count of every person.
"From the beginning, the census implicitly recognized three race categories: white, black, and Indian.
It was only following the passage of the 14th Amendment (requiring the counting of “the whole number of persons” rather than “free persons”) that the census became a true count of every person.

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Published by: woodstockwoody on Mar 22, 2011
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03/31/2014

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MARCH 2009
BRIEFING
 
R E P O R T
 
U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS
RACIAL CATEGORIZATION
IN
THE 2010 CENSUS
 
U.S. Commission on Civil Rights
The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is an independent, bipartisan agency established byCongress in 1957. It is directed to:
 
Investigate complaints alleging that citizens are being deprived of their right to vote byreason of their race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin, or by reason of fraudulent practices.
 
Study and collect information relating to discrimination or a denial of equal protection of the laws under the Constitution because of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, ornational origin, or in the administration of justice.
 
Appraise federal laws and policies with respect to discrimination or denial of equalprotection of the laws because of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or nationalorigin, or in the administration of justice.
 
Serve as a national clearinghouse for information in respect to discrimination or denial of equal protection of the laws because of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, ornational origin.
 
Submit reports, findings, and recommendations to the President and Congress.
 
Issue public service announcements to discourage discrimination or denial of equalprotection of the laws.Members of the CommissionGerald A. Reynolds,
Chairman
 Abigail Thernstrom,
Vice Chair
Todd GazianoGail HeriotPeter N. KirsanowArlan D. MelendezAshley L. Taylor, Jr.Michael YakiMartin Dannenfelser, Staff DirectorU.S. Commission on Civil Rights624 Ninth Street, NWWashington, DC 20425(202) 376-8128(202) 376-8116 TTY www.usccr.govThis report is available on disk in ASCII Text and Microsoft Word 2003 for persons with visualimpairments. Please call (202) 376-8110.
 
 
Racial Categorizationin the 2010 Census
 
A Briefing BeforeThe United States Commission on Civil RightsHeld in Washington, DC, April 7, 2006Briefing Report

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