Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Ceramic production and Ethnoarchaeology

Ceramic production and Ethnoarchaeology

Ratings: (0)|Views: 668|Likes:
Published by Perju Madalina

More info:

Published by: Perju Madalina on Mar 22, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/07/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CeramicProductionandCommunitySpecialization:AKalingaEthnoarchaeologicalStudy
STOR
®
MiriamT.Stark
WorldArchaeology,
VoL23,No.1,CraftProductionandSpecialization(Jun.,1991),64-78.
StableURL:http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0043-8243%28199106%2923%3Al%3C64%3ACPACSA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-8
WorldArchaeology
iscurrentlypublishedbyTaylor
&
Francis,Ltd..YouruseoftheJSTORarchiveindicatesyouracceptanceofJSTOR'sTermsandConditionsofUse,availableathttp://uk.jstor.org/aboutiterms.htmi.JSTOR'sTermsandConditionsofUseprovides,inpart,thatunlessyouhaveobtainedpriorpermission,youmaynotdownloadanentireissueofajournalormultipiecopiesofarticles,andyoumayusecontentintheJSTORarchiveonlyforyourpersonal,non-commercialuse.Pleasecontactthepublisherregardinganyfurtheruseofthiswork.Publishercontactinformationmaybeobtainedathttp://uk.jstor.org/joumals/taylorfrancis.html.EachcopyofanypartofaJSTORtransmissionmustcontainthesamecopyrightnoticethatappearsonthescreenorprintedpageofsuchtransmission.JSTORisanindependentnot-for-profitorganizationdedicatedtocreatingandpreservingadigitalarchiveofscholarlyjournals,FormoreinformationregardingJSTOR,pleasecontactsupportesjsror.org.http://uk.jstor.org/FriMay716:06:492004
 
Ceramicproductionandcommunityspecialization:aKalinga
ethnoarchaeoloqical
study
MiriamT.Stark
IntroductionTheimportanceofcraftspecializationinthedevelopmentofsocialcomplexityhasconcernedarchaeologistsfornearlyahalfcentury(e.g.ChiIde1946)andremainsavitalcomponentofresearchonstateformation(e.g.Arnold1987;Brumfiel1981;BrumfielandEarle1987;Muller1987;Sinopoli1988;Tosi1984).However,comparativeethnographicdatasuggestthatcraftspecializationconstitutesacommoneconomicalternativetoanexclusiverelianceonfarmingstrategies,particularlyforhouseholdsthatarefacedwithinadequateaccesstoagriculturalresources(Netting1990).Althoughhousehold-basedcraftspecializationmayinvolvemosthouseholdsinacommunity(e.g.Hendry1957;Papousek1981;Shepard1963;West1973forMesoamerica),littleisknownabouttheconditionsunderwhich
community-
basedspecializationdevelops.Productivespecialization,asusedinthisstudy,isviewedas'theproductionofgoodsandservicesforabroadconsumerpopulation,ona(usually)full-timebasis,inordertoearnalivelihood'(Muller1987:15).Individualsinasocietymayspecializeintheproductionofparticulargoods,butthedevelopmentofcommunity-basedspecializationrequiresthatlargergroupsofhouseholdsspecializeinoneormorealternativeproductivestrategies,sincetraditionalagriculturalpursuitsaloneprovideinsufficientreturns(seealsoRice1987;189).Asdefinedhere,productivespecializationmayincludethemanufactureofproducts(e.g.pottery,basketsandwoodencrafts),
a
cultivationofagriculturalresourcesandtheharvestingofforestproducts(e_g.grai
rts
orfibrow;plants,liketheLatinA
merican
magueyplant).Althoughcom
mun
ity
eraft-specialization
is
docurnen
ted
in
the
ethnographic
record
1
littleisknownabouttheconditionsunderwhichsuchspecializationdevelopsbeyondthesimplecorrelationbetweenspecializationandresource-poorareas(e.g.Arnold1985).Whatremainstobeexploredisthesuiteoffactorsthatencouragesintensificationofproductionandthatgeneratesdifferentscalesofproductionbyspecialistcommunities.Theethnoarchaeologlcalperspectiveofferedbycommunity'specializationamongtheKalingaofnorthernLuzon,Philippines,providesimportantinsightsintotheseissues.Asaregularcomponentofthearchaeologicalrecord,ceramicshavebeenthefocusofmanyspecialiststudiesinrecentyears(Benco1988;Evans1978;Hagstrum1985;Knapp1989;Kramer1985;Longacre
etat.
1988;Rice1981).Thispaperpresentsanethnoarchaeologicalstudyofcommunityspecializationinceramicproductionintheremotehighlandsofthe
WorldArchaeologyVolume
23
No.1CraftProductionandSpecialization
©
Routledge1991
0043~8243/9112301l064$3.00/1
 
Ceramicproductionandcommunityspecialization65
c
'50
I(jlornfltll!lr'll
r-
iiiiiMiIi--..
o
3.0Millfl!.
T()1oII1l
P
fQ1t1f1(ial
Soundollry
I(
01
i
nQaAfellor
t<:(llifll:;!O-
A.pQ~aQP'Q~ince
KALINGA-APAVAOCAGAYAN
,
ILOCOS\/riiOU~TAINPflOVINc.!'_.;'SUR-":ISA8ELAIFUGAO
"
-
.--BENGUET:NUEVA
vi
ZCAYA
"
\_NUEVAECIJATARL~C
Figure!
NorthernLuzonprovinces,thePhilippines.
northernPhilippines.TribalpottersintheKalingavillageofDalupaPasilnowproduceandexchangelargequantitiesofceramicstomeettheirhouseholds'subsistenceneeds.WhileDalupapottersasindividualsremainpart-timeceramicspecialists,pottersinfifty-five(72percentof)householdsproduceandexchangepottery.Theentirevillagenowsuppliesceramiccookingpotsandwaterjarstoawidearea,asacommunityspecialization.ThepaperfirstpresentsKalingacommunityspecializationasacasestudy.Kalingacraftspecialization,asanalternativesubsistencestrategy,enablesparticularcommunitiestoparticipateinaregionalexchangesystem.Followingthecasestudy,theissueofcommunityspecializationisaddressedfromabroadethnographicperspective.Somearchaeologicalimplicationsofcommunitycraft-specializationstudiesaresuggested.
TheKalinga
case-studyKalingapotters
Ii
veintheruggedCordilleramountainsofnorthernLuzon,Philippines,inthesouthernportionoftheKalinga-ApayaoProvince(Fig.1).Abundantanthropological

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->