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Where Childrens Needs Drive Spending

Where Childrens Needs Drive Spending

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Published by Indicus Analytics
The sub-segment of urban SEC D where the head of the household is in his middle years is made up of households whose chief wage earner is married with young children and who may be a skilled worker with primary school education or an unskilled worker who may have gone to college. The chief wage earners, who by and large fall in the age group 25-44 years, are not very well-educated, more than half have just completed middle school. Yet, the majority have settled into regular salaried jobs, and a little less than 40% are self-employed, owning their own units.

The sectors of employment are varied – trade, manufacturing, transport and communication and construction and real estate are the top four fields that have absorbed these chief wage earners. With relatively low skill and education profiles, jobs in the government or large private companies are not easy to come by, so most work in proprietorship units.

Household sizes are usually of three to four members, mostly nuclear. Though a little less than a third do have more than two children, most of the households have one or two minors. There are 11 cities where more than half the households have more than two children, predominantly in the north, for instance Aligarh, Jalgaon, Patna, Gwalior, Meerut etc.

At the other end of the spectrum, there are 8 cities where less than 10% of the households have more than two children, six in the south and two from West Bengal. This is essentially a young segment, just 11% of the households have senior citizens.

Household budgets therefore would focus on education and meeting the needs of these children on various fronts; whether it is going out for food, entertainment etc. or buying the latest in nutritional food, like all families, these households will put their children’s needs at the top of the list.

While spouses have low schooling levels as well, they are for the most part home makers. Consequently, in most households there is just one earning member, less than a quarter of the households have two or more earning members.

Household income of course would then be concentrated in the lower segments, however a small minority of households do earn more than Rs. 10 lakh per year. The top five cities with highest number of these relatively rich households are Delhi, Mumbai, Thane, Kolkata and Bangalore. Interestingly cities like Faridabad, Surat, Jaipur and Ernakulam have more number of such rich households than Hyderabad and Pune.

With chief wage earners now settled in their family and careers, most of them have purchased houses. Others would be saving to make this jump in asset ownership.

Car penetration is low, even then mostly small cars while two wheelers are of course the first purchase in vehicles. While televisions and refrigerators are now common in most urban households, microwaves have made their entry into the kitchens in this segment too – Chandigarh, Gurgaon, Gautam Buddha Nagar, Faridabad and Purbhi Singhbum all have penetration higher than the metros. When it comes to media preference, the maximum time per day is spent on watching television.

The numerous channels in all regional languages has made this the preferred media for entertainment and news. The internet and newspapers tie at second place, reflecting the age groups in this segment. The small internet cafes offering cheap access to the net dot the landscape of urban India and is the quickest way to catch up on news, employment and entertainment from a wide range of sources. Interestingly, the time spent on the internet per day by this sub-segment is highest in Tier 2 and 3 towns across the country like Allahabad, Belgaum, Dhanbad, Jabalpur etc.
The sub-segment of urban SEC D where the head of the household is in his middle years is made up of households whose chief wage earner is married with young children and who may be a skilled worker with primary school education or an unskilled worker who may have gone to college. The chief wage earners, who by and large fall in the age group 25-44 years, are not very well-educated, more than half have just completed middle school. Yet, the majority have settled into regular salaried jobs, and a little less than 40% are self-employed, owning their own units.

The sectors of employment are varied – trade, manufacturing, transport and communication and construction and real estate are the top four fields that have absorbed these chief wage earners. With relatively low skill and education profiles, jobs in the government or large private companies are not easy to come by, so most work in proprietorship units.

Household sizes are usually of three to four members, mostly nuclear. Though a little less than a third do have more than two children, most of the households have one or two minors. There are 11 cities where more than half the households have more than two children, predominantly in the north, for instance Aligarh, Jalgaon, Patna, Gwalior, Meerut etc.

At the other end of the spectrum, there are 8 cities where less than 10% of the households have more than two children, six in the south and two from West Bengal. This is essentially a young segment, just 11% of the households have senior citizens.

Household budgets therefore would focus on education and meeting the needs of these children on various fronts; whether it is going out for food, entertainment etc. or buying the latest in nutritional food, like all families, these households will put their children’s needs at the top of the list.

While spouses have low schooling levels as well, they are for the most part home makers. Consequently, in most households there is just one earning member, less than a quarter of the households have two or more earning members.

Household income of course would then be concentrated in the lower segments, however a small minority of households do earn more than Rs. 10 lakh per year. The top five cities with highest number of these relatively rich households are Delhi, Mumbai, Thane, Kolkata and Bangalore. Interestingly cities like Faridabad, Surat, Jaipur and Ernakulam have more number of such rich households than Hyderabad and Pune.

With chief wage earners now settled in their family and careers, most of them have purchased houses. Others would be saving to make this jump in asset ownership.

Car penetration is low, even then mostly small cars while two wheelers are of course the first purchase in vehicles. While televisions and refrigerators are now common in most urban households, microwaves have made their entry into the kitchens in this segment too – Chandigarh, Gurgaon, Gautam Buddha Nagar, Faridabad and Purbhi Singhbum all have penetration higher than the metros. When it comes to media preference, the maximum time per day is spent on watching television.

The numerous channels in all regional languages has made this the preferred media for entertainment and news. The internet and newspapers tie at second place, reflecting the age groups in this segment. The small internet cafes offering cheap access to the net dot the landscape of urban India and is the quickest way to catch up on news, employment and entertainment from a wide range of sources. Interestingly, the time spent on the internet per day by this sub-segment is highest in Tier 2 and 3 towns across the country like Allahabad, Belgaum, Dhanbad, Jabalpur etc.

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Published by: Indicus Analytics on Mar 23, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/04/2013

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The heterogeneitythat characterizesthe modern Indianconsumer hascreated a mazethat marketerswould like tounravel in order totarget theirproducts andservices precisely.In this fortnightlyseries, IndicusAnalytics willpresent the variousfacets of urbanconsumers, acrossgeographies andsocio-economicgroups
 
The sub-segment of urban SEC D where the head of the household is in his middle years ismade up of households whose chief wage earner is married with young children and who maybe a skilled worker with primary school education or an unskilled worker who may have gone tocollege. The chief wage earners, who by and large fall in the age group 25-44 years, are notvery well-educated, more than half have just completed middle school. Yet, the majority havesettled into regular salaried jobs, and a little less than 40% are self-employed, owning their ownunits.The sectors of employment are varied
trade, manufacturing, transport and communicationand construction and real estate are the top four fields that have absorbed these chief wageearners. With relatively low skill and education profiles, jobs in the government or large privatecompanies are not easy to come by, so most work in proprietorship units.
 
Household sizes are usually of three to four members, mostly nuclear. Though a little less than athird do have more than two children, most of the households have one or two minors. There are11 cities where more than half the households have more than two children, predominantly in thenorth, for instance Aligarh, Jalgaon, Patna, Gwalior, Meerut etc.At the other end of the spectrum, there are 8 cities where less than 10% of the households havemore than two children, six in the south and two from West Bengal. This is essentially a youngsegment, just 11% of the households have senior citizens.Household budgets therefore would focus on education and meeting the needs of these childrenon various fronts; whether it is going out for food, entertainment etc. or buying the latest in
nutritional food, like all families, these households will put their children’s needs at the top of the
list.While spouses have low schooling levels as well, they are for the most part home makers.Consequently, in most households there is just one earning member, less than a quarter of thehouseholds have two or more earning members.

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