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Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi-VOL021

Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi-VOL021

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Published by tij15
This are the volumes form the revised - erroneous - version of the CWMG as published on the CD-Rom "Mahatma Gandhi - Interactive Multimedia - Electronic Book" in 1999. Page and volume nos. are not identical with the original print version of the 1960's-1990's. The content of this CWMG version is to be credited as "The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi (Electronic Book), New Delhi, Publications Division Government of India, 1999, 98 volumes"
vol 021- July 1, 1920 - November 14, 1920
This are the volumes form the revised - erroneous - version of the CWMG as published on the CD-Rom "Mahatma Gandhi - Interactive Multimedia - Electronic Book" in 1999. Page and volume nos. are not identical with the original print version of the 1960's-1990's. The content of this CWMG version is to be credited as "The Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi (Electronic Book), New Delhi, Publications Division Government of India, 1999, 98 volumes"
vol 021- July 1, 1920 - November 14, 1920

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Published by: tij15 on Mar 23, 2011
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05/13/2011

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VOL. 21 : 1 JULY, 1920 - 21 NOVEMBER, 1920
1
1. “PATH OF TRUTH FOR THE BRAVE ALONE”
1
July, 1920
“The path of truth is for the brave alone, never for a coward.” Irealize the significance of this poem
2
 
more and more as days pass. Ialso see that it is not for grown-ups only to put the idea of this verseinto practice; children and students, too, can do so. If we try to knowand follow the path of truth right from childhood, then alone, ongrowing up, shall we be saved from following the path of untruth. Justas a disease, if neglected, becomes chronic and incurable, so alsountruth, if permitted to take rot in us from childhood, will later growinto a serious disease and, becoming incurable, gradually ruin ourhealth. It is for this reason that we find untruth increasing in us.So the highest lesson to be learnt during one’s student-life isthat one should know truth and act on it.This path has always been for the brave because a much greatereffort is required to go up the steep slope of truth than to climb theHimalayas. If at all, therefore, we want to work in this direction andserve ourselves, we should give the first place to truth and marchforward with unshakable faith in it. Truth is God.
M
OHANDAS
[From Gujarati]
Madhpudo,
I, ii
1
 
This was Gandhiji’s contribution to
Madhpudo,
the manuscript magazine of the Ashram School, Sabarmati.
2
 
By Pritamdas (
c.
1720-1798); a Gujarati poet and Vedantin
 
2
THE COLLECTED WORKS OF MAHATMA GANDHI
2. LETTER TO THE PRESS ON REPATRIATION OF SOUTH AFRICAN INDIANS
July 1, 1920
1
I have just read the interim report
2
of the South AfricanCommission
3
 
published in
Indian Opinion
recently received. As itreads, the report seems to be harmless. Even the word “Repatriation”does not occur in it. It is a cautiously-worded document. And as thereseems to be no opposition to the recommendation from the residentIndian population, I am not inclined to oppose the proposal of theCommission. At the same time there is no mistaking its intention.Indeed they have not even attempted to conceal it, for, they ask HisExcellency the Governor of South Africa “to appoint an official wellacquainted with the Indian mind and their methods to act in asympathetic manner and lay before the Indians the advantages of immediately returning to India”. The case for the scheme is that theIndians are anxious to return and that the scheme satisfies that anxietywhereas the anxiety seems to be all on the part of the Commission andtheir return is to be stimulated by placing its advantages before oursorely tried countrymen. The working of the scheme will, however,require ceaseless watching. There should be no compulsion of anykind whatsoever and no forfeiture of rights of domicile. I was pleasedto notice absence of any reference to such forfeiture in the interimreport. One however never knows what undertaking may not be takenfrom the poor returning Indians against the grant of a free passage. If the scheme is benevolently intended to relieve the present distress theUnion Government will simply facilitate the return of those who areunable to support themselvs in South Africa, without bargaining forthe forfeiture of domicile. To insist upon the loss of that valuableright would be to take a mean advantage of the distressful conditionon some of our countrymen in South Africa.
Young India,
7-7-1920
1
 
Released on this date through the Associated Press of India;
vide The BombayChronicle,
2-7-1920
2
 
It contained a scheme of voluntary repatriation of Indians from South Africato be carried out under Section 6 of the Indians’ Relief Act, 1914;
vide
“Uncanny”,14-7-1920.
3
 
Appointed by the South African Government to enquire into the question of Asiatics trading and holding land in South Africa. The Commission was assisted bySir Benjamin Robertson on behalf of the Government of India.
 
VOL. 21 : 1 JULY, 1920 - 21 NOVEMBER, 1920
3
3. LETTER TO N. C. KELKAR
1
CONGRESS
2
B
OMBAY
-7,
July 2
[
1920
]
3
DEAR MR. KELKAR
4
 
,
I thank you for your very prompt rep[ly.]I retur[n] . . . t . . . which you may keep . . .I shall t . . . t an alternative of the cree[d in ter]ms of yoursuggestion. We ce[rtainly] ought to make it the broadest possible.I agree that we need not fix the fees for membership forCongress committees. Perhaps you will agree to a minimum fee.I accept [yo]ur suggestion as to the advisability of laying downthe method of Taluka and District committees.If you wish to avoid overlapping and want a fairly scientificconstitution you will find that there is no room for affiliations. Thosewho want to be represented must join one of the series of groups.Whether you accept the limit at 1,000 or will increase it, I think the membership ought to be limited to a manageable figure. Withoutthat the Congress will remain an unwieldy body and we would not [beable] to carry the weight we othe[rwise cou]ld. In drafting thecon[stitution I ha]ve attempted to give the [Congress] a representativecharacter such as would make its demands irresis[tible.] I wouldtherefore ask you to [recon]sider your views about limiting thenumber.I accept your figure for delegate’s fee.I agree that the other fees may not [be] fixed by the Congress.The present rules for the election of the president may remain asthey are. I wanted to say so but my letter had already gone. But Iwould erase the bombastic speeches that are made at the time of theelection. Two best speakers may in addition to the chairman of the R.
1
 
The office copy of the letter has been damaged in many places by termites.
2
 
The word “Congress” in Gandhiji’s hand indicates the file in which the letterwas to go.
3
 
The consitution referred to in this letter was passed in 1920.
Vide
also“Letter to N. C. Kelkar and Others”, about 15-6-1920.
4
1872-1947; political leader of Maharashtra; author and journalist

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