Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Interview with Jaron Lanier - Pioneer of Virtual Reality

Interview with Jaron Lanier - Pioneer of Virtual Reality

Ratings: (0)|Views: 81 |Likes:
Published by PresencaVirtual
Entrevista com um pioneiro da área, Jaron Lanier (em inglês)
Entrevista com um pioneiro da área, Jaron Lanier (em inglês)

More info:

Published by: PresencaVirtual on Mar 28, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/05/2011

pdf

text

original

 
AN
INTERVIEW
WITHJARON
LANIER
R
IGHT
BEFORE
MY
EYES
Jaron
Lanier
built
an
artificial
reality
and
then
climbed
into
it
.
JaronLanier
is
one
of
the
principal
visionaries
of
cyberspace
(WER
#64)
or,
as
he
prefers
to
call
it,
"VirtualReality
."
One
nightrecently
I
went
down
to
his
offices
in
Redwood
City,
CA,
to
gather
up
illustrations
for
the
following
interviewwith
him
.
It
was
an
historic
evening,for
the
first
time
someone
created
an
instantfantasy
world
and
crawled
into
it
.
l
went
in
after
hinr
There
are
about20
groups
(primarily
in
the
States)
working
on
building
virtual
realities
.
Lastissue
we
reported
on
theprogress
of
the
group
at
NASA
which
had
succeeded
in
puttingtogether
a
system
of
helmet,
glove,
and
a
monochrome
three-
dimensional"stick"
reality
.
A
group
in
North
Carolina
has
also
come
up
with
advanced
models,
incolor,
-
JaronLanier
is
the
guy
behind
thedataglove
that
NASA
uses
.
The
dataglove
re-
produces
your
real
hand
into
a
virtual
hand
by
means
of
flexible
fiber-optic
cables
attached
to
a
lightweight
glove
you
slip
your
real
hand
into
When
you
point,
your
virtual
hand
points
.
It's
veryelegant
.
Lanier's
company,
VPL,
is
developingthecon-
ceptof
the
glove
into
a
whole
bodysuit
.
The
clothing
so
far
is
not
elegant
.
It's
made
bulky
by
cumbersome
cables
growing
off
the
imbs
and
the
back
..
VPL
has
a
production
model
of
avirtual-reality
goggle,
which
they
are
calling
"eye-
phones
."
The
night
F
was
therethey
were
trying
outthe
first
one
offtheir
verysmall
production
line
(one-per-day
capability)
.
The
goggles
seem
to
needmuch
fine
tuning
.
They
haven'tgotten
to
thepoint
where
they
are
able
toadjust
them
easily
or
greatly,
so
when
a
new
person
puts
them
on
there
is
some
timespent
fiddling
.
My
eyes
do
not
align
properly
in
the
best
of
times,
so
they
were
unable
to
adjust
the
vertical
alignment
ofthe
stereoimages
.
l
had
to
strain
to
make
the
30
image
work
(which
I
often
have
to
do
with
stereoscopic
images)
.
The
goggles
are
alsoheavy,leaving
an
indented
linein
your
forehead
when
you
take
them
off
.-I
had
considered
the
NASA
wire-frame
worlds
as"state-of-the-art"
andwas
not
expectingthe
field
to
advance
sofar
so
quickly
.
The'virtual
worlds
VPL
has
created
are
in
full
technicolorwith
shaded,
contoured
surfaces!
They
are
far
from
photo-
graphic
quality,
yetthere
is
a
sense
ofcompleteness
.
It
seems
a
real
world,
in
thesensethafa
Disneycartoon
seems
real
.
("Real"
is
going
to
become
one
of
the
most
relative
words
wellhave
.)
Overall,
I'd
saytheimpression
is
of
being
a
.'toon
in
Toon-
land
.
The
visual
quality
of
the
world
shown
onthe
outside
monitors
is
attractive
-
about
the
resolution
of
your
run-of-the-mill
computer
animation
.
The
qualityinside
thegoggle
is
quite
abit
less,
a
little
fuzzier,
and
without
the
same
color
subtlety
.
-~-
The
images
look
to
me
about
like
what
I'd
seeon
a
smallcolor
TV
that
had
seen
betterdays
.
The
virtual-reality
images
are
produced
by
two
Silicon
Graphics
com-
puters
about
the
size
of
oversize
luggage
-
one
for
each
eye
.
When
I
arrived
in
the
evening,
Lanier
was
working
on
his
"reality
built
for
twa
.
"
fine-tuning
it
for
an
upcoming
public
demo
for
the
PacificBell
telephone
company
.
Inthis
world
two
people
wearbody
suits
with
datagloves,goggles,
and
ear
phonesThe
virtual
space
theyare
in
is
a
triangular
room
with
a
poster-size
PacBell
logo
,
hovering
in
one
corner,
and
a
cluster
of
smallmulticolored
triangles
buzzing
around
theplace
like
a
hyperactive
TinkerbelL
You
canreach
outand
grab
the
cluster,
yank
it
to
whereyou
want,
and
release
it
like
a
bird
.
So
can
theother
person,
and
when
she
does,
you
see
herdo
it
in
the
virtual
world
.
Yousee
the
other
person
as
a
.
computer-generated
figure,
a
female
calledJoan,
butshe
could
be
represented
in
almostany
form,
as
Jaronpoints
out
in
this
interview
.
(I
never
saw
who
orwhat
..
l
looked
like
.
Virtual
mirrorsare
a
futurecertainty
.).
.
As
impressive
as
this
demo
was,/didn't
really
perceivethe
magic
of
what
f
anon
is
speculatingabout''until
he
showed
me
the
first
personal
instant
world
.
When
I
first
arrived
at
8
:30
in
the
evening,
Jaron
said
he
wanted
to
make
up
a
world
forme
-
a
crazy,
imaginative
world.,He
claimed
that
they
hadbeen
so
busy
inventing
hard-
ware
and
developing
the
software
that
he
hadn't
had
anytime
tofool
aroundmak-
ing
worlds
sincethey
got
thesystemgoing
in
the
last
fewweeks
.
He
immediately
sat
down
athis
Mac
and
began
creating
it
,
He
used
an
off-the-shelf
graphics
program
called
Swivel
3D
(S400
.
4151543-3848),
developed
by
VPL,
to
draw
a
floorplan
of
his
world
in
color
.
It
wasa
wild
arabesque
floor
-
large
green,
brown
and
maroon
polygons
and
star-shaped
tiles
.
On
that
he
built
chalk
obelisk
pedestals
with
immense
ruby
gemsperchedontopand
twirling
orange
flames
issuing
outof
them
.
In
thecenter
were
severallarge
green
frondsthat
looked
more
like
immense
green
tapeworms
if
you
thought
about
it,
but
worked
nicelyas
fern
plants
if
you
didn't
.
He
drew
all
these
using
the
usual
Mac
painting
toolswhile
I
was
photographingthe
hardware
and
other
illustrations
.
In
about
two
hours
hewasdone
making
a
new
world
.
He
rushed
his
floppy
overto
Chuck,
the
hacker
on
the
Silicon
Graphics
machines,
who
began
loading
it
into
virtual
reality
.
Jaronput
on
his
helmet
and
entered
his
instant
world
.
Very
soon
hewas
on
he
`
carpeted
floor,
sprawled
with
his
mouth
open,
slowlywrithing
into
a
new
positionto
expl
-
ore
some
hidden
aspect
of
his
tiny,
newly
hatched,
and
unnamed
uni-
verse
.
He
found
that
he
could
get
in
between
the
layers
of
patterns
on
his
floor
and
sort
of
float
between
the
maroon
stars
and
the
green
and
brown
polygons
.
He
waswormingover
.
the
carpetlookingforun-usualperspectives
and
exclaiming
in
delight
when
hefound
a
curious
view
he
hadn't
expected,
The
rest
of
us
stood
around
and
watched
the
monitor
to
see
what
he
saw
.
One
by
one
we
took
turns
trying
on
themagical
goggles
.
Each
of
us
would
put
it
onand
slowly
melt
as
if
in
a
stupor,
stalking
in
slow
motion
until
wewound
up
laid
out
on
the
carpet,
or
huddled
in
thecorner
constrained
from
exploring
any
further
by
the
actualwalls
of
the
room
.
Jaron's
girlfriend,
still
wearing
a
bluebodysuit
from
an
earlier
demonstra-
tion,let
out
quietyelps
of
amazement
when
she
dis_
covered
that
thechalkpedestals
were
hollow
and
that
you
could
goup
inside
themand
see
the
bottoms-
of
the
rubiesl
"This
is
the
Guinness
world
record
for
the
'
craziestvirtual
world
yetl"
Jaronsquealed
.
You
have
to
keep
in
mind
that
most
of
theresearch
to
datehas
been
done
by
the
military,
;It
was
la
-
te,
11
:30
pm
.-Theblue
figure
of
Jaron's
girlfriend
on
diefloorslowly
tryingto
find
"the
right
place
;"
moving
.
was
Strangely
rotating,
,
to
a
distant,
internal
logic
.
Jaron
was
on
the
floor,
too,
twrkg
his
massive
.
rastafarian
dreadlocks
.
The
room
had
the
leftover
aura
of
psychedelics
.
"Well,I'm
addicted,"uI
suggested
after
I'd
had
my
visit
to
his
tiny
dreamland
.
"Pleasedon't
use
that
word
with
this,"
Jaron
asked
softly
.
"Lookwhathappened
to
mushrooms
."
The
ensuingconversation
revealed
that
some
of
his
old
friends,
as
well
as
hisgirlfriend,
have
done
schalady
.research
in
legitimate
uses
of
pyschoactive
drugs,
only
to
have
their
researchcareers
halted
by
the
reclassification
of
thesubstances
as
illegal
.
He
was
highly
amused
like
Terence
McKenna,wereappearing
in
thisissue
along
.
that
some
of
them,
with
his
interview
"I'm
really
worried
that
virtualrealities
may
become
illegal,"
:
Jaronsighed
.
.'
,
I
m
inclinedto
agree
that
virtual
realities
may
be
that
powerful
.
I'mrunnin
tha""'
'
this
interviewat
its
fun
length,
because
nowhere
else
have
l
.seenbow
power
so
accurately
and
compassionately
described,
the
visionaries
of
the
next
8eneration7
Here's
one
of
them
.
Where
are
.,
without
a
high-school
diploma
even
though
major'univer-
ion
Lanier
is
29
,
Ja
sities
are
unable
to
keep
up
with
his
research,
and
adec6cated
musician
who
la
a
guitar
without
t~physical
guitar
.
He
is
interviewed
by
Adam
wanted
to
py
writer
and
translator
in
Portuguese,
French
and
rs
Persian,
and
Barbara
Stacks
.
-Kevin
Kelly
It's
a
world
without
limitation,
a
world
as
unlimited
as
dreams
.
It's
alsoa
world
that's
shared
.
The
wearer
of
this
VPL
bodysuit
is
transported
into
an
alternative,
computer-generated
.world
.
Fiber-opticcables
runningthrough
the
suit
and
gloves
(far
left)
produce
signals
when
flexed
.
 
ADAM
HEILBRUN
:
The
word
"virtual"
is
computer
jargon
.
Couldyou
clarify
it
forthose
unfamiliar
withthe
concept?
JARON
LANIER
:I
know,
I
don't
like
it
either
;
too
tech-y,
butso
far
I
have
not
been
ableto
come
up
withanythingbetter
.
"Virtual"
means
something
thatexists
only
as
an
electronicrepresenta-
tion,
which
has
no
other
concrete
ex-
-
istence
.
It's
as
ifit
were
there
even
ifit
isn't
.
It's
not
necessarily
the
right
word
.I
like
it
betterthan
"artificial
:'
I
like
it
better
than"synthetic
:
I
"Shared
Dream
;'
"Telereality"
-
I
don't
know
.
I
don't
like
it
.I
think
it
soundsnerdy
butnothing
better's
come
along
.I
don't
know
what
to
call
it
.
Some
people
callit
"cyberspace"
after
William
Gibson,
,
but
I
think
that's
dreadful
.
It's
very
limiting
andeven
more
computery
.
VirtualReality
is
nota
computer
.
We
,,
At
theend
of
the
stems
they
have
little
arespeaking
about
a
technology
that
headphone
speakers
very
much
like
a
uses
computerized
clothingto
synthe-
Walkman,
which
allow
you
to
hear
the
size
shared
reality
.
It
recreates
our
re-
sounds
of
the
virtual
world
.
There's
It
does
more
than
that
;
theglove
also
lationship
with
the
physical
world
in
a
nothing
too
unusual
there
;
they'rejust
,
measures
how
your
hand
is
moving
.
new
plane,
no
more,
no
less
.
It
doesn'texactly
like
youreveryday
Walkman
This
is
very
important
so
that
in
the
vir-
affect
the
subjective
world
;,
it
doesn'tspeakers
.
The
soundsyouhear
onthem
tual
worldyoucan
see
a
version
ofyour
haveanything
todo
directly
withwhat'sare
a
little
bit
unusual
in
that
they're
hand
to
seeyour
movements
.
It's
!m-going
on
inside
your
brain
.
It
only
has
t8
Processed
to
havethree-dimensionalportant
that
youwear
clothingthat
not
do
with
what
your
senseorgansper-
quality
;
they
come
from
certain
:
only
transfers
sensations
to
youbut
ceive
.
The
physical
world,the
thing
on
directions
.
measures
what
your
body
is
doing
.
The
the
other
side
of
your
sense
organs,
is
computer
that's
runningthe
Virtual
received
through
these
five
holes,
the
The
glasses
do
one
other
thing
too
;
Reality
will
useyour
body's
movements
eyes,
andthe
ears,
and
the
nose,
and
they,
havesensors
in
them
that
can
'
to
control
whateverbody
youchoose
the
mouth
;
and
the
;
skin
.
They're
not
,
sense
your
facial
expression
.
This
is
"
'
to
have
in
VirtualReality,
which
might
holes,
actually,
andthere
are
many
_
_
very
important
because
you
are
a
part_
.
.be
human
ormight
be
something
quite
more
senses
than
five
but
that's
theofthe
Virtual
Reality
and
the
clothing----
-
different
.
You
might
very
well
be
a'
oldmodel,
so
we'll'juststick
with
that
youwear
has
to
sense
as
much
as
;
mountain
rangeora
galaxy
or
a
pebble
'
it
canabout
your
body
.
It
uses
that
in-
formationto
control
the
virtual
version
.
of
your
body,
which
bothyouand
other
people
perceive
as
being
you
in
the
VirtualReality
.
Virtual
Reality
outfic'wouldhave
a
pair
of
glasses
and
a
glove
.
I
10
WHOLE
EARTHREVIEW
FALL
1989
that'sconvincing,
and
there's
some
tech-nology
involved
in
accomplishing
that,
but
that's
a
good
metaphor
.
When
you
put
themonyou
suddenlysee
aworld
that
surrounds
you
-
you
seethe
vir-tual
world
.
It's
fully
three-dimensional
and
it
surrounds
you
.
Asyou
move
.
yourhead
to
look
around,the
images
that
you
see
inside
theeyeglasses
are
shifted
in
such
a
way
that
an
illusion
of
movement
is
created
-
you
moving
whilethe
virtual
world
is
standing
still,
The
images
come
from
a
powerful
special
computer
which
I
like
to
call
the
Home
Reality
Engine
.
It
will
be
sitting
there
in
your
room
and
will
pluginto
the
phone
outlet
.
I'll
say
some
morewords
about
the
Home
Reality
Engine
in
a
second,
but
let's
stay
withthe
glassesfor
now
.'
ple
working
in
Virtual
Reality
a
chanceto
jostle
about
these
different
possibi-
lities
before
we
decide
definitely
what
thingsarecalled
and
exactly
what
they'll
do
.
But
this
is
a
very
plausible
setupthat
I'm
describing
.
You
wear
gloves
on
your
hands
.
These
allow
you
to
reach
outand
feel
thingsthataren't
really
there
.
The
inside
of
thesurface
of
theglovehas
tactile
stimulators
so
that
when
the
Home
Reality
Engine
can
tell
that
your
hand
is
,
touching
a
virtual
object(even
though
there's
no
objectthere)
you'll
actually
feel
theobject
.'
The
second
function
of
thegloves
is
that
they
actually
allow
you
tointeract
;
with
objects
.
You
can
pickup
an
object
and
do
things
with
it
;
just
like
you
would
witha
real
object
.
You
can
pick
up
a
virtual
baseball
and
throw
it
.
So
it
allows
you
to
do
thingsto
the
world
;
on
thefloor
.
Or
apiano
:
.
I've
con
"
"
sidered
being
a
piano
.
I'minterested
in
being
musical
instruments
quite
a
lot
.'
'
Also,
you
canhave
musicalinstrumentsthat
play
reality,in
all
kinds
of
ways
aide
frommakingsound
in
VirtualReality
.'
That's
another'
way
of
describing
arbi-
Beforeyou
enterthe
Virtual
Realityyou'll
see
a
pile
of
clothingthat
youhave
to
on
iri'order
to
perceive
a
Put
different
world
thaai
the
physical
world
.''
The
clothing
onsistsgconsists
mostly
of
a
pair
:
So,
for
instance,
you
might
choose
of
glasses
anda
pair
of
gloves
.
Exactly
;
to
become
a
cat
in
VirtualReality
.
Or'
.
'n
real
If
ou're
a
cat
ou
might
traryphysics
.
With
a
saxophone
you'llthin
there
will
be
it's
too
earl
'
'.what
clo
anythl
gYYY
g
~Y
to
say
.
There
are
a
lot
ofdifferent
vari-
very
well
be
wired,
so
to
speak,
so
that'
be
able
to
play
cities
and
-
dancing
lights,
`
and
ou'll
be
abletoplay
theherding
of
i
aware
ossible
and
itsrea
lly
when
you
smile
in
the
real
world
the
y
at
ons
th
pY
.
-
..
,
catthat
ou
are
in
Virtual
Realitysmiles
.
buffaloes
made
of
crystal
.
and
you'll
be
too
earlyto
predict
which
well
bethe
r
Y
ular
ones
A
minimal
kind
of
As
your
eyesdart
around
looking,
the
able
to
play
your'ownbody
andchange
mosto00
eyes
of
thecat
dart
around
u
well.'
yourself
as
you
play
the
saxophone
.
You
And
so
the
eye
glasses
also
have
acould
become
a
comet
in
the
sky
one
function
in'sensing
your
face
..
moment
andthen
gradually
unfold
into
a
spider
that's
biggerthan
the
planet'that
looks
down
at
all
your
friends
from
high
above
.
The
glasses
allow
you
to
perceivethe
visual
worldof
VirtualReality
.
Instead
The
headset,the
eyeglasses
-
they're
of
having
transparent
lenses,
they
have
;
sometimes
called
eyephones
-
you
visualdisplays
that
arerather
like
small
-
have
to
remember
thatwe'rewitness-three-dimensional
televisions
.
They're
ing
the
birth
of
a
culture
here,
so
a
lot
.
Then,
of
course,
there's
the
Home
;
muchmore
sophisticated
than
small
of
terms
aren't
really
settled
down
into
RealityEngine,
a
computer,
that
by1989
televisions,
of
course
.
They
have
to
pre-
,
being
a
particular
way
just
yet
.I
think
.,
standards
is
verypowerfulbut
in
the-
:
.,
sent
a
three-dimensional
worldto
you
>
we
have
to
give
the
community
of
pen-
future
will
just
be,
a
regular
computer
.
It
has
a
lot
ofjobsto
do
.
It
has
tobe,re-
aintingthe
graphics
that
your
eyes
see,
P
and
calculating
the,
soundsthat
your
.,
:,;
earshear,
and
calculating
the
textures,
;
thatyour
skin
feels,
all
thetime
quickly
;
municenoughso
that
the
world
is
realistic
:
.
That's
avery
big
task
.
It
has
to
com-
ate
with
other
Hgme
Reality
En-
.
;
ines
in
other
peoples
housessothat
ou
canshare
realities
with
other
pen-
Ya
;
.
le`
and
that's
a
very
big
task
.
It's
quite'
P
.
ec'ial
computerand
it
makes
a
Macintoshlook
likea
little
speck
.'`
,
...
a
AH
:
When
you
first
put
on
your
clothing
and
become
aware
of
the
Home
Reality
EngineJare
you
pre-
.
,
sentedtividt
something
analogoustothe
Macintosh
desktop,that
is
to
say
.
.
;
a
work
space
with
tools
init?
JL
;
What
will
probably
happen
is
that
the
Home
Reality
Engine
will
havea
it'
capability
toscanthe
room
that,s
in
and
so
your
glasses
.
The
very
first,
will
yo
thin
g
that
you'll
see
when
you
put
on
.-
very
well
be
a
time
You
might
Virtual
RealItydothing
for
the
first
n
rY
will
simply
be
an
alternate
version
of
'rang
e
or
acarted
out
mountain
galaxy
the
physical
room
that
you
sin
.
So,
for
instance,
if
you
are
in
your
liv-you
floor
.
uput
on
Virtual
Reality
Ora
pebble
,
o
nthe
ing
room
and
yop
`
clothing
's
supposethat
your
living
'-
.
let
a
ion
0
~
and
it
has
a
set
of
:r
room
has
a
couch,
p
it
has
a
window,
it
has
two
shelves,
and
el
ngpiano
.
d
b
;
hh
co
nsidere
'
it
hasa
chair
it
as
all
tese
.
doorways,
.
things
and
it
has
certain
dimensions'
-
(walls
and
ceiling)
.
When
you
t
on
your
glasses
the
first
thing
you'll
see
is
an
alternate
version
of
your
living
room
withthe
same
dimensions
.
Wherever
there
is
a
thing
in
the
living
room
there`
will
be
something
in
the
Virtual
world
:
'
Where
there's
a
chair,
in
the
living
room
there
will
be
a
something
in
the
Virtual'
world
.
It
probablywon't
be
a
chair-
it
 
what
you
experienced
.
;
Experience
becomes,
store
something
You
omPuter
file
.
"
something
somet
in
a
computer
c
can
some
of
us
.
You'll
certainly
make
your
own
after
a
while
.
But
the
thingthat
you
have
to
remember
JL
:
What
would
you
actually
do!
See,
is
that
Virtual
Reality
is
a
much
broader
that's
a
verypersonal
decision
.
You
anything
.
idea
than
.
say,
the
Macintosh
.
Its,
pur-have
to
understand
that
in
the
Virtual
The
point
is
that
in
Virtual
Reality
there's
pose
will
be
general
communication
Reality
.
each
personmighthavevery
no
need
for
a
single
metaphor
.
whereas
with
other
people,
not
so
much
getting
personal
idiosyncratic
tools
that
,
might
there
is
a
need
for
a
single
design
meta-
sorts
of
work
done
.
The
Macintosh
was
even
be
invisible
to
others,
but
it's
the
phor
in
a
computer
.
We
are
used
to
conceived
asa
way
of
automating
desk-shared
reality
that
you
affect
by
using
.
switching
contexts
in
real
life
.
It's
nor-
.
type
ofwork,so
theyusedthedesk-
,
your
toolsthat
counts
.
That'swhat's
mall
to
be
in
your
living
room
in
whichtop
metaphor
.
It
was
quiteappropriatethe
most
important
thing
.
And
it's
nice
you
behave
one
way
and
in
which
you
:
'
and
obviously
it's
been
very
successful
;'
to
see
each
other's
tools
too
;
it's
do
certain
things,
andthen
go
to
work,
'
it
wasa
cultural
match
,
rather
intimate
but
it
will
be
fun
.
say,
andyou
do
something
totally
dif-
VirtualReality
is
conceived
ofasan
ex-
Myway
of
having
my
memories
might
ferent,
yougo
tothe
beach
andyou're
in
anutterlydifferentstateof
mind,Pansion
of
reality,
the
Provision
of
al-
be
...
I
think
I'll
keep
them
behind
my
.
'
and
yougo
into
a
templeand
you're
in'
ternate
realities
for
peopleen
masse
in
ear
.
I
imaginereaching
behind
my
ear
temple
still
differentstate
of
mind
.
All
those
which
to
shareexperiences,
andsotheand
pulling
themout
in
front
of
my
eyes
-places
are
really
different
streamsof
"
'
types
of
metaphors
that
come
upareand
then
I'll
suddenly
find
myself
wear-
are
wear
life
that
we
associate
withan
overall
`
:
things
like
cars,travel,
different
coun-
ingbifocals
where
i
wasn't
before
.
In
the
.
tries,
different
cultures
..
For
instance,
lower
half
of
the
bifocals
I
see
the
virtual
environment
.
"'
you
might
very
well
have
a
.
virtual
carworld
as
it
is
shared
and
in
the
upper
There'ssimply
no
need
for
one
unified
'
`
that
you
ride
around
in
eventhough
half
I'mlooking
into,
my
memories
of
paradigm
forexperiencing
the
physical
'-
physically
you're
in
one
place
.
It
would
the
past
.
Thesearent
real
bifocals,
of
very
well
might
be
a
chair
.
though
.
The
Home
Reality
Engine
will
just
do
a
sub-stitution
.
The
reason
for
this
is
that
it
will
prevent
youfrom
bumping
into
AH
:
Mechanically,
how
doyougo
about
playing
back
your
memory?
world,'
and
there's
no
need
for
one
in
.
gothrough
differentterritories
in
Vir-
'
course
.
From
now
on
whenever
I
referVirtual
~Reality
either
.
Virtual
Reality
is
"
tual
Reality
so
that
you
could
getaround
toanything,
fm
talking
about
virtual
not
like
thenext
way
computers
will
be
;
'
them
-
or
transporter
booths,perhaps
.
things,
not
physical
things
.
it's
muchmuch
broaderthan
the
idea
,
,
go
you
could
have
geographical
meta-,
,
There
may
be
a
machine
that
looks
like
of
a
computer
.
A
computer
is
a
specific
phors
.
There
might
very
well
evolve
a,
tool
.
VirtualReality
Is
analternate
real
-
"
new
geography,
let's
say
-
a
fictitious
itY
and
you
shouldn'tcarry
over
into
planetWith
new
continents
that
you
:
Virtual
Reallty,the
limitationsthat
are
can
diveinto
to
find
new'
realities
:
necessaryfor
computers
to
make
sense
.
In
the
earl
ViAual
Realitiesyou'll
onlyonly
.
It's
an
absurd
Ilmitadj
-
on
.
Becausewhat
be
able
to
see
the
VirtualReality
when
aspects
of
my
history
.
One
will
say,
"Well
filter
out
everythingthat
wasnt-
-
InIt
you're
there
will
be
moremore
.
.
,
s'Later,
ones
wh
sopere
you'
canblend
inthis
room
:'
Another
will
say
.
"Filter
,
.
histicated
'
Virtual
objects
and
Physical
objects
so
out
anything
that
wasnt
with
this
otherother
I
""that
you
tan
live
in
a
mixed
reality
for
-
person
:'
And
another
will
say,Filter
FilterVirtual
Reality
will
havethe
equivalent
a
while
andbe
ableto
seeyourphysicalout
anything
that
didn't
involve
music
:'~
ofdirectories
in
computers,
butthey
environment
as
if
you
were
wearing
.
and
so
forth
.
When
I
flick
all
these
filters'
`
'''
wont
look
like
directories,
of
course
.
sunglasses
but
also
have
nonphylical
ob~'
into
place,
I
have
a
narrower
and
nor-
`"
There
may
be
giant
trellises,trellises
a
jects
mixed
in
it
.
Thai
will
be
a
later
'
''
rower
view
of
my
history,
so
fm
looking
;
/million
mile's
miles
across,
thatare
perfectly
stage
.
We're
already
*
developing
tech-"'
`~
at
less
and
less
of
it
.
Another
filter
I
,
an
'pull
yourself
`
orderof
'
'
might
flick
intolace
will
order
it
in
dif-'
'
lightweight,
that
you
c
Yo
nology
to
do
that