Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Alamo Guide: April-June 2001

Alamo Guide: April-June 2001

Ratings:
(0)
|Views: 250|Likes:
Guide to Alamo Drafthouse programming from April-June 2001
Guide to Alamo Drafthouse programming from April-June 2001

More info:

Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Alamo Drafthouse Cinema on Mar 29, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/04/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
Write something here
APRIL 1JUNE 30
THE GIFT
( 3 stars, Roger Ebert, 
Chicago Sun Times)
Consider Annie Wilson (Cate Blanchett), the heroine of  "The Gift." Her husband was killed in an accident a  year ago. She has three kids. She gets a government  check, which she supplements by reading cards and  advising clients. She doesn't go in for mumbo-jumbo.  She takes her gift as a fact of life; her grandmother had  it and so does she. She looks at the cards, she listens to  her clients, she feels their pain, she tries to dispense  common sense. She is sensible, courageous and good. She lives in a swamp of melodrama; that's really the  only way to describe her hometown of Brixton, Ga.,  which has been issued with one example of every  standard Southern gothic type. There's the battered  wife and her redneck husband; the country club  sexpot; the handsome school principal; the weepy  mama's boy who is afeared he might do something real  bad; the cheatin' attorney; the salt-of-the-earth sheriff,  and various weeping willows, pickup trucks, rail  fences, country clubs, shotguns, voodoo dolls,  courtrooms, etc. When you see a pond in a movie like  this, you know that sooner or later, it is going to be  dredged. "The Gift" could have been a bad movie, and yet it is a  good one because it redeems the genre with the  characters. Blanchett's sanity and balance as Annie  Wilson provide a strong center, and the other actors in  a first-rate cast go for the realism in their characters  instead of being tempted by the absurd. The movie was  directed by Sam Raimi and written by Billy Bob  Thornton and Tom Epperson. They know the territory.  Raimi directed Thornton in "A Simple Plan" (1998), that  great movie about three buddies who find a fortune  and try to hide it; Thornton and Epperson wrote "One  False Move" (1992), about criminals on the run and old  secrets of love.  The movie is ingenious in its plotting, colorful in its  characters, taut in its direction and fortunate in  possessing Cate Blanchett. If this were not a crime  picture (if it were sopped in social uplift instead of  thrills), it would be easier to see the quality of her  work. By the end, as all hell is breaking loose, it's easy  to forget how much everything depended on the  sympathy and gravity she provided in the first two  acts. This role seems miles away from her Oscar- nominated "Elizabeth" (1998), but after all, isn't she  once again an independent woman surrounded by  men who want to belittle her power, seduce her, frame  her or kill her? A woman who has to rely on herself  and her gifts, and does, and is sufficient. 
TRAFFIC
( 4 out of 5 stars, Marc Savlov, 
Austin Chronicle(
Far and away the best film of the year, and perhaps of  the past decade as well. At its core, the film is a sober- minded look at the drug trade, from an all-inclusive  angle that takes on both the War on Drugs'  policymakers in our nation's capital to the dealers,  users, cops and DEA agents on the streets, and  everyone in between. Instead of taking the easy way  out, with a blanket statement about the inherent evils  the international drug market creates, Soderbergh  tackles virtually every angle of the hellish business of  drugs and drug control. He's like a naturalist poking  around in the brush, overturning every rock he finds to  reveal the slimy, crawling creatures beneath, holding  them up to the light and allowing us a painfully clear- eyed view of their squirmings. The film intertwines  three distinct storylines. All three of these complex  storylines are interwoven so skillfully that the whole  nasty affair plays out like a modern-day Dickens novel,  if A Tale of Two Cities had featured shoot-outs and  teenage whoring. Unlike the pale, dry scenes on the  Mexican side of the border, Soderbergh shoots the  Washington and Georgetown locales through a heavy  blue filter, emphasizing the duplicitous, shadowy  goings-on. On either side of this so-called "war,"  however, the level of intrigue is virtually equal: There  are no good guys in Soderbergh's tale, and even those  closest to the law are tainted. 
Traffic
, surprisingly,  features a couple of the year's best cameos: Real-life U.S.  politicians, such as Senators Orrin Hatch and Barbara  Boxer, turn up in a D.C. party scene. In such a massive,  thoroughly impressive cast as this one, it's difficult to  single out a single actor as The One, but Benicio Del  Toro's scruffy Tijuana cop is, frankly, a revelation. His  jaw-droppingly smooth portrayal of Javier Rodriguez, a  generally decent sort of man caught up in a web of  officially sanctioned bullshit so sublime and massive  that its very existence boggles the mind, is amazing. His  is the sort of performance that Best Actor awards are  made for, and this one role single-handedly redeems an  entire year's worth of multiplex crud. Nearly as  amazing is Erika Christensen's long, slow ride to hell as  Caroline. By the time Michael Douglas hits the streets to  search for his lost progeny, it's like George C. Scott's  similar odyssey in 
Hardcore
, only worse. There's not a  bad or flat performance on display here, an amazing  thing given the size, scope, and running time (147  minutes) of the film. What's even more amazing is the  fact that Soderbergh has managed to accomplish in one  film what policymakers on both sides of the Drug War  fence have been trying to do for decades. He brings the  war back home and lets us view its ravages from  seemingly every angle at once. It's a thrilling, powerful  movie, and one that certain people in certain quarters  may have at one time called dangerous. Some of them  may yet still.
SNATCH
( 4 out of 5 stars, Marc Savlov, 
Austin Chronicle(
Ritchie's follow-up to last year's smash hit 
Lock, Stock  and Two Smoking Barrels
 is likely to polarize the critical  camps (and already has, for the most part). Its hyper- violent comic bloodshed is sure to offend some, while  others will embrace the film's ferocious editing and  manic, rocket-fueled pace (courtesy of editors Jon  Harris and Les Healey). And then there's Tim Maurice- Jones' snappy, everything-and-the-kitchen-sink  cinematography. 
Snatch
 is nothing if not watchable: It  has the insane, popcorn rhythms of a 
Road Runner 
cartoon, and for that reason alone it's a minor  masterpiece. Never have so many characters done so  much damage to each other with such an interesting  assortment of ordnance. In this respect the film echoes  the wild excesses of the gangsterific shoot-'em-ups  arriving from Hong Kong circa 1990. It's John Woo  minus the thieves' code of honor, transposed to  modern-day comic-Cockney London. In other ways, 
Snatch
 also updates classic British heist comedies such  as Charles Crichton's celebrated 
The Lavender Hill Mob 
-- no Alec Guinness, of course, but we do get ex-soccer  bad boy Vinnie Jones and an incomprehensible Brad  Pitt. It's almost a fair trade. Like Ritchie's previous film, 
Snatch 
revolves around a spindly series of often- confusing storylines that eventually meet up and pay  off, big-time, in the final reel. There's the unlicensed  boxing-match promoters Turkish (Statham, who also  narrates the proceedings) and Tommy (Graham), who  run afoul of vicious bastard Brick Top (Ford) when their  fighter takes a permanent dive into oblivion. In his  place, they enlist the aid of Irish Gypsy bare-knuckles  boxer Mickey O'Neil (Pitt), a fast-talking schemer with a  penchant for first-round K.O.s. Then there's Avi  (Farina), a New York-based diamond importer on the  trail of a 84-carat super-rock stolen from Antwerp by  gambling-obsessed Frankie Four-Fingers (Del Toro).  Avi, his British connection Doug the Head (Reid), and a  trio of East-London lowlifes (James, Gee, Ade) are all  involved in the race for this mighty chunk of inanimate  carbon against the legendary Azbekistani psycho-killer  Boris the Blade (Serbedzija), who, like everyone else in  Snatch, wants the rock for himself. Ritchie pulls out all  the stops with 
Snatch
 -- the film has (rightly) been  compared to 
Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels
, although it certainly feels as though Ritchie is trying to  top himself here, and to his credit (and my amazement)  he does. Snatch is a tighter, more resilient film than its  predecessor in every way right down to the opening  titles. It reminds me of when a young Aussie  wunderkind named George Miller pulled off the  unthinkable and topped 
Mad Max
 with the exuberantly  psychotic 
The Road Warrior
. I've said it before and I'll  say it again: Now that's entertainment!
O, BROTHER WHERE ART THOU
(3.5 out of 5 stars, Marc Savlov, Austin Chronicle)
Whether you leave the theatre loving or hating the Coen  brothers' latest is going to depend a lot on your past experiences  with their films. The 
Barton Fink
 camp -- serious, edgy,  surrealists all -- are likely to find the proceedings here too silly.  It's the Coens at their most goofy, raising the stakes on 
Raising  Arizona's
 low-brow shenanigans by expanding the canvas to  include not just the dusty backwater burgs they love so well,  but also the whole of Depression-era Americana. It's a  sprawling film and the comic tone matches Joel and Ethan's  broad, comic brushstrokes to a T -- this is what you get when  you give these two sufficient finishing funds (you can thank  France's Studio Canal) and zero suits-on-set. Silly or not,  however, the fact remains that 
O Brother
 is a remarkable film.  From its performances on down to director of photography  Roger Deakins' sun-baked, dirty-ochre cinematography, the film  is all of a piece. As the opening titles inform us, the plot owes  much to Homer's 
Odyssey
 (although the Coens themselves have  gone on record saying that, really, they hadn't bothered to read  the damn thing until just lately). Clooney, Turturro, and Nelson  are, respectively, Ulysses Everett McGill, Pete Hogwallop, and  Delmar O'Donnell, a trio of chain-gang escapees seeking a  (possibly mythical) treasure while on the lam from a diabolical  sheriff. Their travels take them all across the depressed,  dustbowl South, out of one jam and into another, their paths  crossing and re-crossing a bizarre series of characters (some  fictional, some less so) until they finally return to their home  and accomplish Everett's main mission: the search for his  estranged wife Penny (Hunter). While the film may at first seem  to be little more than a finely crafted cluster of Coen-style set- pieces (which, in many ways, it is), the whole of it is  thematically united by a particularly affecting  Americana/bluegrass score from the likes of Harry McLintock,  Emmylou Harris, Allison Krauss, and the Soggy Bottom Boys.  The latter is in reality Clooney, et al. The boys on the lam are the  boys in the band, having recorded an unknown-to-them hit  record that becomes the film's unofficial theme song. It's worth  the price of admission (and then some) to see Clooney perform  the track in disguise and onstage at a political rally overseen by  Charles Durning's scheming Governor Pappy O'Daniel. Again,  it's silly stuff to see this American heartthrob and icon dancing  about like a scarecrow on corn liquor, but it's also one of the  most commanding comic performances I've seen lately. At his  best, Clooney, who seems to be channeling the spirit of Johnny  Depp as Ed Wood by way of Errol Flynn, could give Jim Carrey  a run for his money -- the role is that outrageous. As in most  Coen brothers films, it's the smaller roles that make the film.  John Goodman's Cyclopean bible salesman turns out to be both  a hoot and a holler, and 
The Practice
's Michael Badalucco -- as  gangster George Don't call me Babyface Nelson -- is one of  the Coens' better sidetracks into human parody. I wouldn't  agree that this is the Coen brother's best film, as some have said. 
Fargo
 and the underrated 
The Hudsucker Proxy
 are more fluid  and rely less on their penchant for unstable comic characters.  But 
O Brother 
manages to be somehow more sympathetic to  these oafish-seeming simpletons. By the end of the film you  realize nothing in the filmmakers' world is as simple as it at first  appears. 
BLOW
excerpted from Harry Knowles 
Ain't It Cool News
 Review The first GREAT film of 2001, that I know for certain about,  will be being released sometime in April. Many of you will  not believe me, thats fine. Be skeptical walk into that  theater thinking Ive pulled down the big bucks for hyping  this if you must, but Im telling you In the same type of  genre as GOODFELLAS I prefer BLOW. And when I last  talked to Moriarty he was in the same boat. Why?  First it starts with the script by David McKenna (AMERICAN  HISTORY X) and Nick Cassavetes. McKenna brought an  amazing structure to the film condensing a mans entire life  into a feature film. Cassavetes placed that mans soul into the  film. This is the true story about a man you probably have  never heard of. He is sitting in a Federal Prison for bringing in  a shipment of cocaine. It wasnt a GIGANTIC deal. Hell be  out in 2015 or so. But this man has touched and affected the  lives of nearly everyone on the planet because he happened to  be a connection a piece to the puzzle, the key guy that  brought cocaine into the United States through a partnership  with Pablo Escobar. Americas cocaine problem started  through this man and a barber began on beach selling pot  with his childhood best friend to surfers and beach bunnys.  Did you ever see that PBS series on how the Personal  Computer came to be? About that group of slackers drinking  canned cokes and eating pizzas while being stoned and  screwing around and making that first PC? I remember while  watching that thing that I was just beside myself with awe at  how something so world changing couldve come from  something as simple as a bunch of buddies shooting the shit  and activating and working on their crazy idea. George Jung  and California with that group of people happened to be the  kindling that began the fire that swept up the entire world  still affects the entire world.  What is brilliant though is we see how something like this  happens. We see that it wasnt this EVIL man out to ruin  millions of lives but just a guy trying to make a buck and  stick by his friends trying to hop around the system  This is quite possibly the best film I have seen come out of  New Line. I was completely engrossed by the film. I am  definitely set to pick up the Bruce Porter book that the film  was based on. I was devastated by the film.  When it came to a close and I was actively sobbing, I saw  Moriarty facing the wall and hand abreast his temples. Mongo  landed on the floor flat on his ass. We were sucker  punched the air taken out of us. It is personal and told with  all the heart in the world. As you watch it, you cant help but  to feel great remorse for a man that caused more suffering and  bliss than any man has any right to.  It is a story about human nature, about repeating mistakes  you thought you learned from, about tragedy and elation. This  is the story about cocaine and the United States, and I hope to  God NEW LINE markets the hell out of this one, and re- releases it this Fall for awards considerations. The music,  cinematography, acting, writing and direction are absolutely  of the finest possible quality. Look for Moriartys review very  soon. Im sure he is going to be just as happy with it as me.  And as for you Just be content with the knowledge that the  possibility is very high that youll see at least one truly great  film this year 
The Alamo Drafthouse Cinemais proud to announce the openingof it's second location at therecently vacated Village Cinema Four.More details inside...
ALAMO  DRAFTHOUSE  NORTH OPENING SOON!
In the current climate of rampant theater closures in Austin,  Tim and Karrie League, owners of the Alamo Drafthouse  Cinema, offer a small piece of positive news. We are proud to  announce that we have signed a lease with the Village Shopping  Center to renovate and take over operations of the Village  Cinema on Anderson Lane. The Theater will be called: The  Alamo Drafthouse North (at the Village). We will be extending  out concept of dinner, drinks and movies to the north Austin  location. The Village will continue to operate as a first run  theater on three screens and one screen will be a rotating  screen, showing calendar films, eclectic programming and local  films. The theater will also be available for parties, meetings  and special events during off hours, and there is ample parking  day and night to accomdate meetings and movie screenings. We  will be completely renovating the interior, adding Dolby sound  to the screens and replacing the existing seating.
 
We hope that  the Alamo Drafthouse North will be a welcome addition to the  film scene, and we look forward to working with and serving  the Austin community to bring more good movies to our city.  We expect to be open in mid to late June, so stay posted to  www.drafthouse.com for details about the opening date and the  big opening bash! Since September, 2000 MR. SINUS has been selling out weekly  shows at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Austin, Texas. Fans  of comedy, film, and, of course, the Mystery Science Theater  3000 television program have been filling the seats, hungry for  this unique multimedia event. Mr. Sinus picks up where the  now-defunct TV show left off, only this time the comedians are  live, front row center at the theater. This quarter, check out  screenings of Xanadu and Star Trek 5: the Final Fronteir. The  regular Mr. Sinus slot is now Fridays at 9:30, but Check the  calendar, www.drafthouse.com or the weekly Chronicle for  showtimes.