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ormp_2006: Ocean Resources Management Plan

ormp_2006: Ocean Resources Management Plan

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Published by: Trisha Kehaulani Watson-Sproat on Mar 31, 2011
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H
AWAI
I
O
CEAN
R
ESOURCES
M
ANAGEMENT
P
LAN
 
D
ECEMBER
2006A
CKNOWLEDGEMENTS
 
This Hawai‘i Ocean Resources Management Plan (ORMP) was developed with assistance from Tetra Tech EM Inc.based on priorities identified through public consultation and the efforts of many individuals, agencies, andorganizations including the following:
Government Agencies
Hawai‘i State Department of AgricultureAquaculture Development ProgramHawai‘i State Department of Business, Economic Development andTourismScience and Technology BranchOffice of PlanningHawai‘i State Department of Hawaiian HomelandsHawai‘i State Department of HealthEnvironmental Health AdministrationOffice of Environmental Quality ControlHawai‘i State Department of Land and Natural ResourcesOffice of the ChairpersonOffice of Conservation and Coastal LandsAquatic Resources DivisionDivision of Boating and Ocean RecreationConservation and Resources Enforcement DivisionForestry and Wildlife DivisionLand DivisionState Parks DivisionHawai‘i State Department of TransportationHarbors DivisionHawai‘i State Office of Hawaiian AffairsNative Rights, Preservation, Culture & LandUniversity of Hawai‘iHawai’i Sea GrantHawai’i Institute of Marine BiologySchool of Ocean and Earth Science and TechnologyCity and County of HonoluluDepartment of Permitting & PlanningCounty of Hawai`iPlanning DepartmentCounty of Kaua`iPlanning DepartmentCounty of MauiDepartment of PlanningNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationNational Marine Fisheries ServiceNational Marine Sanctuary ProgramPacific Services CenterWestern Pacific Fishery Management CouncilU.S. Army Corps of EngineersU.S. Coast GuardU.S. Department of AgricultureNatural Resource Conservation ServiceU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyU.S. NavyU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Nongovernmental Organizations, Private Sector,and Advisory Groups
Ahupua`a Action AllianceAssociation of Hawaiian Civic ClubsBelt Collins Hawai‘i Ltd.Cates InternationalCommunity Conservation NetworkConservation Council for Hawai‘iHawai`i Audubon SocietyHawai`i Ocean and Coastal CouncilHawai‘i’s Thousand FriendsLahaina Divers, Inc.Let's Surf CoalitionLife of the LandMarine and Coastal Zone Advocacy Council(MACZAC)Maui Dive ShopOcean Tourism CoalitionOceanic InstitutePolynesian Voyaging SocietyThe Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘iVP Fair Wind CruisesYamanaka Enterprises Inc.A publication of the Hawaii Office of Planning, Coastal Zone Management Program,pursuant to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Award Nos.NA03NOS4190082 and NA04NOS4190038, funded in part by the Coastal ZoneManagement Act of 1972, as amended, administered by the Office of Ocean andCoastal Resource Management, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic andAtmospheric Administration, United States Department of Commerce. The viewsexpressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views ofNOAA or any of its sub-agencies.
 
Hawai‘i Ocean Resources Management PlanHawai‘i Ocean Resources Management PlanHawai‘i Ocean Resources Management PlanHawai‘i Ocean Resources Management PlanOverviewOverviewOverviewOverview iiii
LINDA LINGLE
 
GOVERNOR
THEODORE E. LIU
DIRECTOR
MARK K. ANDERSON
 
DEPUTY DIRECTOR
LAURA H. THIELEN
DIRECTOROFFICE OF PLANNING
DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS,ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM
OFFICE OF PLANNING
 235 South Beretania Street, 6th Floor, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
 
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2359, Honolulu, Hawaii 96804
 Telephone: (808) 587-2846Fax: (808) 587-2824
 
Aloha,Pius Mau Piailug, from the Micronesian island of Satawal in the state of Yap, was Hokule‘a’s firstnavigator. He guided the canoe on a 2,300 mile voyage to Tahiti in 1976, the first voyage in over 600years navigated without instruments on this ancestral Polynesian sea route. A young man from Hawai‘i,Nainoa Thompson, recognized the crew of Hokule‘a needed a teacher, and had sought and found Mau.Nainoa was determined to learn all he could from the master navigator, and spent months at his side.In November of 1979, Mau and Nainoa went to observe the sky at L
ā
na‘i Lookout. They would leave forTahiti soon. Nainoa was concerned and a bit afraid of the challenge of charting a new course usingmethods that were unfamiliar to him. Mau must have sensed the uncertainty. He asked Nainoa "Can youpoint to the direction of Tahiti?" Nainoa pointed. Then Mau asked, "Can you
see
the island?"Nainoa remembers he was puzzled by the question. Of course he could not actually see the island; it wasover 2,200 miles away. But the question was a serious one, and he considered it carefully. Finally, Nainoarealized what Mau was really asking, and replied "I cannot see the island but I can see an image of theisland in my mind." Mau said, "Good. Don't ever lose that image or you will be lost."This Ocean Resource Management Plan presents an entirely new course for Hawai‘i. The ultimatedestination is a healthy and thriving ocean, today and for future generations. The course we must navigateto reach our goal requires us to adopt an integrated approach to managing our ocean resources. We mustrecognize the inter-relationship between land and sea, and the need for community and all levels of government to work together collaboratively. We cannot continue to operate in separate sectors,independent of each other’s jurisdictions. Instead it is we who must alter our way of operations in orderto be responsible stewards of this precious gift, our ocean.This change will not come easily, nor will it come quickly. Changing practices in multiple federal, stateand county agencies, revisiting multiple laws, ordinances and regulations, and modifying habits of community-government interactions are very significant changes. However, if we all keep the image of our great-grandchildren playing in a thriving, healthy ocean, we will not get lost. We are capable of meeting this challenge. We must not be afraid of change or the hard work it will take to reach our goal.The reward is well worth the effort.Laura H. ThielenDirector, State Office of Planning
 

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