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NOI_email_experiments

NOI_email_experiments

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Published by Nirmal Mankani

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Published by: Nirmal Mankani on Mar 31, 2011
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01/21/2012

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EXPERIMENTS IN ONLINE ADVOCACY
A Collection of Email Experiments: 2009-2011
 
AUTHORS:NIRMAL MANKANI, NEW ORGANIZING INSTITUTEETHAN ROEDER, NEW ORGANIZING INSTITUTEAPRIL 2011
CONTACTNIRMAL MANKANILEAD ANALYSTNEW ORGANIZING INSTITUTENIRMAL@NEWORGANIZING.COM
 
2
CONTENTS
 
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DEVELOPING A CULTURE OF TESTING
Activism always exists under the influence of limited resources. Money, people, and time are always in limited
supply. Just because an email is “free” does not mean
that it does not expend limited resources. Conceiving,drafting, and implementing an email campaign takes time, the recipients of those emails have limitedcapacity for interacting with and reacting to your message, and the universe of people with whom anyorganization has a pretense to communicate is always limited. Each email is an opportunity for members tounsubscribe from your list, so each message an organization chooses to send carries a tangible cost.
As practitioners we‟re constantly concerned a
bout using these limited resources in the most impactful waypossible. How do we ensure that each email we send meaningfully advances our organizational goals? Whattactics do and do not work in online advocacy? We can answer these questions by running randomizedexperiments with our email programs.This paper explores online progressive advocacy campaigns in the context of experimental research. Wecover why experiments are important and examples of email experiments we have run with partner organizations. We also identify some research questions we feel the community of progressive online organizersshould collectively attempt to answer.Over the last two years we have partnered with a half-dozen progressive advocacy groups to design,implement, and analyze experiments in their own email campaigns. We aimed to assist these organizations indetermining which tactics yield the most value out of their e-mail list, whether that be opens and click-throughs,actions taken, donations, or list growth and retention. This program has included over five million emails sent toa combined 1.4 million individuals.Although the results of the tests from these programs are interesting, our primary goal is to encourage a cultureof rigorous testing in the world of progressive online advocacy. The results of these experiments are not meantto be taken as the final word on these research questions
– 
instead, they illustrate how to approach answeringimportant questions about the way we do our work. We hope that you walk away from this research with adesire to answer similar questions about your own email list. Organizations such as the Analyst Institute and NOIcan help you answer these questions, as well as train you to implement these kinds of experiments yourself.
“IF YOUR FRIENDS JUM
PED OFF A BRIDGE, WO
ULD YOU?”
 
Your mother was right. Just because your friends are doing it doesn‟t mean you should too. Experimentation
and testing is a way to do business; it is in and of itself a best-practice; it is the way to run effective and efficient
programs. Using the results of another organization‟s experiments is like wearing your best friend‟s glasses. Justbecause you both have eyes, brains, blonde hair, and progressive politics doesn‟t mean you share the same
prescription.Ultimately it may be possible to establish generalized best-practices for certain program elements but this willrequire many tests across numerous organizations. These tests will need to be implemented and evaluated in asimilar manner across very different organizations. The organizations tested will need to present a wide rangeof contextual program elements in order to reliably isolate the one element we are testing. Even if we reachthis gold standard, the generalized finding may only be relevant for a few years. The internet is ephemeral, and
the field of online organizing is a space that is constantly changing. People don‟t interact with their email nowin the same way that they did ten years ago, and we certainly can‟t assume that t
he relationship between
humans and technology won‟t continue to evolve.
 

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