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30ways

30ways

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Published by: United Nations Environment Programme on Apr 04, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/20/2012

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30 WAYS IN 30 DAYS
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3
Foreword
Extreme weather events dominated theheadlines of 2010. Pakistan suffered fromthe worst ooding in more than a century,Russia fought wildres stemming fromunprecedentedly high temperatures andChina faced mudslides of an intensity notseen in decades - events consistent with theassessments of the Intergovernmental Panelon Climate Change hosted by UNEP andthe World Meteorological Organization.
For many scientists and political leaders, theconuence of these weather catastrophesamounted to evidence that climate change isnot just a future concern, but a present danger.Meanwhile, negotiations continue towards anew global climate agreement. A package ofpossible measures is under scrutiny in Cancun,which reects the urgency and importanceof ready nance, mitigation, adaptationmeasures for developing countries, and themechanisms needed to operationalize REDD(Reduced Emissions from Deforestation andForest Degradation).Political will and action is paramount. Tohave a reasonable chance of keeping globaltemperature increases below 2
0
C by 2100means containing greenhouse gas emissionsat around 44 gigatonnes of CO
2
equivalentper year by 2020. To achieve this, speedyprogress is needed on many fronts.UNEP, in partnership with leading climate-modelling agencies and expert centres, haspublished an assessment pointing out wherewe are and what’s needed.
The EmissionsGap 
report analyses the emissions targets andmitigation actions in the Copenhagen Accordof 2009, which have the potential to cutannual greenhouse gas emissions by aboutseven gigatonnes of CO2 equivalent by 2020.Parallel measures are needed to spur privateenterprise and encourage thriving carbonmarkets, local community and entrepreneurialsolutions, investment in the carbon capture ofecosystems, and ways to deal with the health,agricultural and environmental hazards ofnon-C0
2
pollutants.UNEP’s 30 Ways in 30 Days show that acrossthe world, in myriad ways, from communitybased programmes to entrepreneurialendeavours, solutions are available to movecountries, communities and businessestowards low emission climate resilient growth.Every country and many institutions have theirown 30 success stories. These solutions delivermultiple benets ranging from access toenergy, public health improvements, reducedenvironmental impacts to driving a transitionto low carbon, greener growth. The challengenow is to accelerate and scale up theseworldwide transitions alongside outcomes thisweek in Cancun.
Achim Steiner
UN Under-Secretary Generaland UNEP Executive Director
 
30 WAYS IN 30 DAYS4
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“Solar lights are a long cherished dream of rural folk who often have no power, or only power supplies that are at best irregular. They are one product that can meet aspirations of people livingbelow the poverty line. It is a good businessopportunity for the bank.” 
Mr P G Ramesh, Chairman,Pragathi Grameen Bank,Bellary,Karnataka, India
Indian solar loanprogramme
Solar loans for rural homes
30 WAYS IN 30 DAYS4
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THE PROBLEM:
More than 60 per cent of Indianhouseholds lack access to reliableelectricity supplies and depend onkerosene for light and on burning dung
 
30 WAYS IN 30 DAYS
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5
and wood for heat. Solar power is an obviousalternative in a sunny country such as India,but high initial costs put it beyond the reach ofmost households, an
d lack o
f access to creditmeans the technology has been the preserveof only the wealthiest. Millions of urban andrural poor have been condemned to the risk ofrespiratory disease that results from solid fuelburning. Lack of electricity is also a powerfulbarrier to economic and social development.
THE SOLUTION:
In 2003 UNEP’s Indian Solar Loan Programmeworked with two of India’s largest bankinggroups in two southern states, to start thelending market for household photovoltaicsystems. The programme provided technicalsupport and training, as well as an interestrate subsidy that allowed the banks to softenthe cost of loan nancing. While the banksdid not prot directly from these subsidies,the project helped them become rst moversin a new market for rural nancing whichsaw almost 20,000 solar home systemsnanced between 2004 and 2007. Subsidieswere gradually phased out to align withother banks entering the market lending oncommercial terms. Consumer credit realizedlatent demand, with over 50 per cent ofrural sales in the two states credit-nancedby the end of 2007, accelerating marketpenetration of solar lights in Southern Indiaand inspiring several similar initiatives in Indiaand elsewhere. In 2008 the programme wonthe Energy Globe Award.
WHAT UNEP DID:
 
UNEP and the UNEP Risoe Centre’s work withCanara and Syndicate banks and their ruralGrameen afliates proved it was possibleto help the rural poor to access clean andaffordable energy. By harnessing free marketforces, the programme created a model forsimilar schemes elsewhere in the developingworld.
THE BIG PICTURE:
 
The programme was the rst at UNEP toshow that obstacles to bank engagement inclean energy can have more to do with softmarket development barriers and perceptionsthan underlying economics. Banks in manydeveloping countries have sufcient capitalto begin lending but the relative newness ofrenewable energy technologies, together withinconsistencies in the quality of the productsand services offered by different vendors,can make lending difcult. In these situationsthe development community needs to shiftaway from traditional credit line approachesand instead focus on more subtle incentiveprogrammes that help banks set up their rstloan portfolios and gain experience with theclean energy sector. This approach is alsocost effective – for instance the $900,000in interest subsidies that UNEP put into theIndian programme generated $6.7 million incommercial nancing for solar home systems. Are these sorts of programmes enough tochange the nance sector’s view of cleanenergy? UNEP experience has been that onceloan portfolios move beyond 10,000 units,banks begin to view the sector as a viablecommercial credit market and will generallydevelop it further. Getting past this 10,000threshold could help accelerate renewableenergy uptake in many countries.
www.unep.org/unite/30Wayswww.uneptie.org/energy/activities/islp

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