Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Reporting Violent Weather in New and Old Media: Tips (Keith Greenwood, Scott Hodgson)

Reporting Violent Weather in New and Old Media: Tips (Keith Greenwood, Scott Hodgson)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 13|Likes:

More info:

Published by: National Press Foundation on Apr 08, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/14/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
How do you cover an episode of violent weather?
How do you make sure that all media platforms – broadcast, online and print – are used together to their best advantage? How to you prepare your“converged” newsroom for such a confusing and deadly event?Those were the questions tackled by the 15 journalist-fellows who attended the National PressFoundation’s “Understanding Violent Weather II” seminar in Norman, Okla., March 11-14, 2007.The group was divided into five teams and challenged to come up with the best converged plan forcovering a large tornado. Here is a selection of their suggestions for meeting this challenge, with hints forwhat to do ahead of time, during the storm and after the storm passes. The same hints could be applied,with variations, to covering a variety of traumatic events.
Before the Storm
 
 
All media
 
o
Determine the chain-of-command long before the event. You may want to deviate fromyour company’s normal hierarchy, for example, by giving the meteorologist enhancedauthority.
o
Share cell phones numbers and email addresses of broadcast, print and online staffers.
o
Anticipate a loss of power and cell phone coverage. Equip news trucks with ability totransmit data for print journalists live as well as video.
o
48 hours in advance of a potentially violent weather, know where you’ll position reporters.
o
Create a back-up plan in case station or newspaper is hit by storm. Have a backupgenerator.
o
Make sure production people and editors are in secure locations where reporters cantransmit information to them.
o
Practice beforehand as a converged team in real time on smaller stories, spot news, andgeneral news. Everyone on team from reporters to camera people should have smallpalm-sized recorders.
o
Connect to citizen journalists so they’ll be available when needed.
o
Create “kiosks” where people can upload information from their cell phones and otherequipment, and where they can, in turn, pick up newspapers and other information, whentelephone or power is out. These kiosks could be stationed at likely gathering places – like fast food restaurants and community centers.
o
Make sure TV and radio can share feeds during emergencies.
o
Establish partnerships with broadcast/print organizations and colleges in the area in casehome base is disabled. (Many colleges have excellent studios and other facilities.)
o
Establish contacts with Ham radio operators.
 
Print
 
o
Devise templates for stories in advance of the storm.
o
Determine which department is responsible for what stories, etc.
o
Put out safety tips, pre-planning concerns – i.e. how to stay safe, evacuation routes.
 
Broadcast
 
o
Have warnings – and explanations of what the warnings mean – to keep peopleprepared.
o
Know how to incorporate into your coverage pre-existing networks of web cameras – such as traffic cameras maintained by local governments.
 
o
Talk with local reporters at newspaper and use them as guests and or phone interviewsfor live TV shots.
 
Web
 
o
Stream video broadcast on website.
o
Use live Doppler radar as storm approaches.
o
Make weather alerts to cell phones available via web site.
o
Weather graphics might include:
How tornados form.
Area observations from weather stations and observers.
Explain the Enhanced Fujita wind damage assessment.
During the Storm
 
 
All Media
 
o
Staff should go into an emergency schedule – 12 on, 12 off.
o
Make TV helicopter available for broadcast, print and web coverage.
o
Have reporters from broadcast and newspaper at both buildings. Partner broadcastreporters with print reporters.
 
Print
 
o
Print reporters should be first on the scene because they’re more mobile - send as manyout as possible.
o
Give print reporters hand-held video cameras and audio recorders for spot coverage andfeeds to web and broadcast.
o
Print reports should report continually for all media and for the full next-day newspaperstory.
o
Editors should delegate responsibilities for various aspects of coverage.
 
Broadcast
 
o
Storm team branding:
Wall-to-wall coverage centered on the meteorologists.
Introduce new graphics to create an extra level of identification and importance.
On radio – carry wall to wall coverage and update info online.
Traffic reports are vital because of high mortality to drivers in tornadoes andother storms. Helicopter reports could be very useful with this.
Meteorologist should toss to chopper reporter throughout broadcast.
o
Run pre-packaged safety stories on what to do.
o
Solicit cell phone video or other video from witnesses and survivors.
 
Web
o
Television broadcast should be streamed on the website.
 
o
Create montage of survivors talking to the camera.
o
Graphics on the home page should switch over to the "storm team" look.
o
Print reporters should report to online division on day of event.
o
Place illustrations of storm shelters on top of the storm track map so people can figureout where to go.
o
Blogs can be used for people to quickly post local information.
Post what streets are open, where gas is out, etc.
Convey information to people who are remote.
Start a tornado blog for witnesses and reporters.
Podcast what to do next narratives.
E-mail alerts about important developments.
VODcasting on cell phones.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->