Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Media Matters: A Look Into The Use Of Media In Russia At The End Of The Twentieth Century

Media Matters: A Look Into The Use Of Media In Russia At The End Of The Twentieth Century

Ratings:

4.5

(2)
|Views: 41 |Likes:
Published by Jessee
2007 University of Alaska Anchorage History Senior Seminar paper that describes the use and misuse of media in the last two decades of the 20 Century in Russia.This paper reads more like informed-entrainment fluff rather than an academic work, it was intended to make readers search out more answers rather than merely address the themes brought up. I'm proud of it, and that's what mattered at the time.
2007 University of Alaska Anchorage History Senior Seminar paper that describes the use and misuse of media in the last two decades of the 20 Century in Russia.This paper reads more like informed-entrainment fluff rather than an academic work, it was intended to make readers search out more answers rather than merely address the themes brought up. I'm proud of it, and that's what mattered at the time.

More info:

Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Jessee on Aug 29, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/27/2010

pdf

text

original

 
Media Matters: A Look Into The Use Of Media In Russia At The End Of The TwentiethCentury Jessee BoullionUniversity of Alaska AnchorageHIST 477/Senior Seminar (Prof. Dennison)Fall Semester 2007
 
2
Media Matters: A Look into the Use of Media in Russia at the End of the Twentieth Century
"Liberty sets the mind free, fosters independence and unorthodox thinking and ideas. But it does not offer instant prosperity or happiness and wealth to everyone. This is something that politicians in particular must keepin mind."
1
Today Russians find themselves living a life more and morereminiscent of the ones they led during the heydays of communism, eventhough the Soviet Union has collapsed. This collapse of the Soviet Unionopened doors to the public about the private matters of the past century,people were taken out from underneath the red shadow of ignorance andcompliance and many were suddenly hungry for answers, independence andfreedoms. Russian historical documents were uncovered and published andthe people wanted to know the intricate details of their past. The periodbetween the years 1989-1999 was a time of discovery and revelation, but bythe time President Vladimir Putin took control in 1999 that feeding frenzy of interest in history had started to be replaced with apathy and numbness tothe past.
2
In seven short years President Vladimir Putin has managed toguide Russian life away from the freedoms so shortly enjoyed under hispredecessor back to a more authoritarian and repressed way of life. This newauthoritarianism is especially evident in Putin’s handling of the briefly
1
Boris Yeltsin. As quoted in Daniel C. Diller ed.
Russia and the Independent States.
Congressional Quarterly: Washington, D.C., 1993.
2
Catherine Merridale, “Redesigning History in Contemporary Russia.” Journal of Contemporary History 38, no. 1 (2003): 18.
 
3
thriving industry of independent Russian media.
3
Russia was at a cross roadswhen it was freed from the Soviet Union's lingering grip; it had the option of providing for its people democratic freedoms enjoyed by a majority of theindustrialized world. Instead Russia has both evolved and devolved back toan increasingly authoritarian state while using the idea of its developingdemocracy to stave off criticisms by the rest of the European West. Russia'smedia has been especially hard hit with this increase in strong governmentauthority. The media went through a period of growth and relative prosperityunder the early rule of Boris Yeltsin. It is currently facing extinction as anindependent and unbiased source of information as Vladimir Putin's swifthand controls the flow and content of any message that reaches his people'sears. Without freedom of press there can be no hope of a true democracy inRussia and due to Putin’s silencing of independent media outlets he isleading his country to democratic failure. Today in the United States, we currently face many restrictions on thefreedoms guaranteed in the Constitution.
4
The most notable restriction onthe rights of our people came in the neutering of the 5
th
Amendment, theright to due process, by current President George W. Bush this past June.
5
3
Alex Lupis, "Freedoms Found & Lost."
Russian Life
50, no. 1(January/February2007): 29.
4
 
Doug Thompson. “Bush on the Constitution: “It’s just a goddamned piece of paper.’ CapitolHill Blue. http://www.capitolhillblue.com/artman/publish/article_7779.shtml (accessedNovember 29, 2007). ““Stop throwing the Constitution in my face. It’s just a goddamnedpiece of paper!” President Bush reportedly said.
5
George W. Bush. “Executive Order: Blocking Property of Certain Persons Who ThreatenStabilization Efforts in Iraq.” The White House.http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2007/07/20070717-3.html?1(accessed December1, 2007). This executive order removes the right of a person to keep their property unlessdue process has been given to them. Due process has been revoked in America for personsthe government deems as being potentially undermining of the war effort in Iraq.

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
pastorboom liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->