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California Geology Magazine August 1991

California Geology Magazine August 1991

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CALIFORNIA
GEOLOGY
APUBllCATlON
OF
THE
DEPARTMENT
Of'
CONSERVATION
DIVISIONOF
"NES
ANDGEOLOGY
$nit
..
of
CaJilomla
PETEWILSON
Governor
In
This
Issue
I
TRAVERTINEHOTSPRINGS
171
SIMPLIFIEDGEOLOGICMAPOFCALIFORNIA",
..
"180ELISE
MATIISON
JOINSCALIFORNIAGEOLOGYSTAFF,.182
MARIPOSITE-THE
ROCKTHATMADECALIFORNIAFAMOUS183DMGBAYAREAREGIONALOFFICERETURNS
TO
SANFRANCISCO
..
187MAILOADERFOAM........189GSAHOLDSANNUALMEETING
IN
OCTOBER
1991
190CALIFORNIAGEOLOGYSUBSCAIPTIONFORM.
..
190CALLFORPHOTOSRESPONSE:
191
The
Resources
~
DOUGlAS
P.
WHEELER
Secretary
for
ReSOUfC85
Department
of
eon
.......allol'l
EDWARDG.HEIOIG
DIrector
0Msl0n
01
Mines
&
Geology
JAMES
F.
DAVIS
StaleGeologist
CALIFORNIA
GEOLOGY
CoverPhoto:
NOI1h
Dome(left),BasketDome(right)
and
Mt
Hoffman(left
center
horizon)fromGlacierPoint,YosemiteNational
Pari<,
California.
These
massivegranitic
domes
have
been
shaped
by
exfoUstion
(seepage
192).
MI.
HoHman(10,850leet)is
named
for
Charles
FredrickHoffman,
a
topographer
and
member
of
the
WhitneySurvey,Call1ornia'sfirstgeologicalsurvey.lissummit
owes
itsdistinctivejagged
appearance
toQuaternaryglaciersthat
gouged
itsflanks.leavingaridge
01
pinnacles.Kodachrome-54.lOSmmlens,
1125,
1111.
Phato
by
James
W.
Carlblom,
submitted
in
response
to
CALIFORNIAGEOLOGY's
CallFor
Photos.
PrItIled;
Department
of
Genet.,
SeMoes
OIlice
01
Slat
..PMl"'"
Bay
AI
..
RegIonal
OITice:
I
1.5
lola",,"
Streel
san
Francisco.
CA
9ol10301513
(.15)
557·1SOO
DM900
1ieaOQu8t1e<s;
1416NIIIIh
SIf",
Room
13-4\
sacramentO,
CA
9581.
(916)
~ 5 · 1 8 2 5
PvllIicatons
and
Nllormalion
0Illc:e.
660
BetCUl
DnvlI,
Sacramento.
CA
95814·(1131
Pulllic
lrlIormallOO:(916)
«$·$716
l.Ds
Angeles
OIlioB
107
South
Ilioaoway.Room
1065
Los
AnQeles,
CA
90012-«02
( 2 1 ~ 1
f;2O.356O
Utah
GeographicInfonnation
Council
FirstAnnual
Conference-October
30.
1991
Thisconference
in
Salt
LakeCity
will
be
theinauguralevent
of
the
UtahGeographicInformationCouncil
(UGrq.The
conference
will
allowthoseinterestedinthedevelopmentandmanagementofgeographicinformation
in
Utahtomeet,exchange
ideas,
andshareexperiences.Allenders
will
be
fromthefederal,state,county,andmunicipal
se<:tors,
as
well
as
academiaandindustT'j.
1he
program
will
featureakeynoteaddress,presentations
on
issuesconfrontingtheUtahgeographicinformationcommunity.andapaneldiscussiontoexplorethepurposeanddirec;tionofUGIC.Formoreinformationcontact:
Bill
LundUtahGeological
SuTVey
(80l)
467-7970
X
Barry
NapierU.S.Geological
Sutvey
(801)
524-5695
EliseMattison
Lena
Tabllio
LouiseHuckaby
JettTamben
AssistantTechnicalEditor:
ASSistantEditor:
GraphICS
and
Design:
Publications
SlJpervisor;
,
,
CAliFORNIA
GEOLOGY
(ISSN0026.555)
~
II\IbII$hed
IIICIIIIhIy
bythe
[lepartmene
at
C o n s e r v a l ~ .
DIVislon
ot
Mines
and
Geology
ThII
R!ICOfdsOITioa
Is
al
172HOth
Streel.
sacramento.
CA
9581
•.
Sealncl
Class
postage
Is
pald
al
sacramento.
C....PoslITlllSlet:
Send
a<l<lrll5S
dUlr'9/l'
kICAl.
~
FOflN!AGEOLOGY
(USPS350840).
80.
2980.Saocramenkl.
CA
95/112·2980.Rapom:
e<>r<»ming
DMsionol
MuIM
and
Geologyprojects.
and
artil;$fi
and
_
items
related
kI
the
earth
sclences'"
c.IilotrIa,
a"
incIudod
inthe
~ i n e
Corllflbutedalticle6.
pI>oIographs,
naws
items,
and
geological
meelong
a_·
_
are
weloome
THECONCLUSIONSANDOPINIONSEXPRESSEDIN
ARTICLES
ARE
SOLELYTHOSE
OF
THE
AUTHQAS
ANDARENOT
NECESSAAILY
ENOOASEO
BY
THE
DePART·
MENTOFCONSERVATION
ConHj)Ol'OClenoe
ahoukI
be
addressed
10
EdilOt.C.....
lfQR·
NIAGEOLOGY.660Ben:uI
Drive,
Saa"""",,o,
CA
9581.·
0131SubocnpIionI
$ICl,oo
p8f
~ a r
SwlQle
copies.
Sl.25
each.
Son:!
~
0Ide<s
a:'o
cI\arIge
01
addtess
inormalOn
IDCALIFORNIAGEOlOGY,PO.Box2980.sac.amenIO.
CA
95812·2980,
August
1991Nolume
44/Number8
Southwest
A R C / I N F O ~
UserGroupFourth
Annual
Conference-October
31
-
November
I,
1991
Thisevent
will
be
sponsored
by
theSouthwestARC/lNFO<!lUserGroup(SWAIUGj.Approximalely
200
participantsareexpectedfromArizona,Colorado,Idaho,Nevada,NewMexico.Utah.andWyoming.
The
first
dayoftheSWAlUGconference
will
focus
on
fonna!presentationsthatincludeacomrnentaT'j
on
theleadershipaspectsofSouthwestRegionGISaclMty.summariesofthestatewideGISsiterelationships
in
eachslateoftheregion.liabilityissues.communityaccessto
GIS
technology.andtheIalestinsoftware
news
from
ESRr<!I.
Aposterpartyanddisplaysofhardcopygraphicsfrom
ARC;1NFO«>
GISsites
will
also
be
included.
The
se<:ond
day
will
be
devotedto"Show-and-Tell,"
an
assemblageofhardwareplatforms
on
whichusersruntheirsolutionstoGISchallenges.simulatingvisitstoeachother'ssites.Rve"Show-and·Tell"activities
will
occursimultaneously.Eachpresentinguser
will
haveasegmentoftimetodesign
hiS
or
her
own
format.Newactivities
will
be
scheduledeachhour.Formoreinformationcontact:
Riki
DarlingAutomatedGeographicReferenceCenter
(801)
538-3159
CGEOA
44
(8)169·192(1991)
~ R I
andARC/INFOareregisteredtrademarksofEnvironmentalSystemsResearchInstitute,
Inc.
X
HO
CALIFORNIAGEOLOGYAUGUST
1991
 
MonoCounty,Califomia
By
CHARLESW.CHESTERMAN
and
FRANK
J.
KLEINHAMPL
Thisarticle
is
an
abridgmentofSpecialRepon
172,
TravertineHotSpringsatBridgeport,MonoCounty,Calilornia,
in
preparationat
the
CaliforniaDivision
of
MinesandGeology.TheTravertineHotSpringsareais
on
thenorthernedgeofwhatmanyconsiderto
be
oneofthemostteetonk:a.llyactiveareas
inthe
UnitedStates.ThereisabundantgeothermalandseismicactiVity.Thelandscapeisdonedwithvolcanic
features
cones,craters,domes,flows,lumaroles
and
hot
springs-lndicators
ofunrestin
the
pl'esent
as
well
as
remindersofactivityinthepast.Travertine,alsoknownascalcareoussinter.
IS
limestone'ormedbychemicalprecipitationofcalciumcarbonate(CaCO
J)
lromgroundorsurfacewaters.
It
formsstalactitesandstalagmitesincaves,fillssomeveinsandspringconduitsandcanalso
be
loundatthemouths
of
spril'lgS,especiallyhotspril'lgs.Thelesscompactvarietyiscalledtula
and
thedense,bandedvarietyisknownasMexicanonyx,
or
onyxmarble.Trueonyx,however,
is
abandedsilicate.Thetermtravertineisderivedfrom
tiverrino,
anItalianwordfor
1rom
TIbur:
TIbur
is
theoldRomannamefor
TIVoli.
Italy.acityeast
0'
Rome.There.travertineforms
the
fallsof
the
AnieneAiver.Thedepositislamousbecauseitis500leet
thiCk
inplaces
and
becauseithasprovidedmuchofthebuildingstoneforAomesinceancienttimes....
editor.
INTRODUCTION
N
I
'---.I
BRIDGEPORT
IllI
\Travertine
Hot
Springs
Bodie
'-"
16
'-.
Figure
1.
LocationmapottheTravertineHotSpringsarea,MonoCounty,California.
T
ravertine
Hot
Springs.
oncepri
vately
controlled,
is
now
underthe
jurisdiction
of
the
U.S.
Bureau
of
Land
Management.It
consists
of
numerous
hot
andcolcl
springs
thatare
unevenly
distributed
over
about
9acres
near
the
southeastern
perimeter
of
the
town
of
Bridgeport.
Mono
County.California
(F"lgure
l).
The
travertine
locality
is
most
easilyreached
by
turning
east
off
U.S.
Highway
395
about
0.6
mile
south
of
thejunction
with
Nevada
Highway23onto
the
paved
road
leading
to
the
California
Department
of
Transportation
yard.
The
paved
road
veers
to
thesouth
and
an
unpavedroadcontinues
east.
1lle
unpavedroad
splits
into
two,
with
the
lou.rer.
right-handbranch
leading
to
thetravertine
area.
The
travertine
terrace
deposits
form
a
compact
tabularmass
markedwith
trav
ertine
ridges
ranging
up
to
850
feet
long
and
15
feet
high.
Hot
waters
ascending
along
fault-controlledfractures
in
Tertiary
volcanicrocksareenrichedin
cal
cium
bicarbonate.
When
these
watersreach
reducedpressures
atthe
surface,
calciumcarbonateprecipitates
toform
travertine.Porouslightweighttravertinecomprises
thebulk
of
the
terraces.ridges.
and
otherhot
spring
features.Adensebanded
travertine
occurs
in
fissuresIn
the
ridges.
Inthe1890sabout
60
tons
of
traver
tine
VJere
quarried
and
shipped
to
SanFrancisco
where
polished
slabs
were
usedas
ornamental
facing
stoneinthe
rotunda
ofCity
Hall.
Subsequent
quarryinghas
been
sporadicand
ispresently
inactive.
CALIFORNIAGEOLOGYAUGUST
1991

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