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Graves, Robert - The White Goddess

Graves, Robert - The White Goddess

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Published by Eileen Garnett

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Published by: Eileen Garnett on Apr 12, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/07/2014

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Mark Carter added this note
The Golden Ass, by Lucius Apuleius, is an ancient Roman novel depicting the comic tale of Lucius, who is magically changed into an ass. It contains details of ancient goddess worship and beliefs commonly held to be authentic. Graves read the Adlington translation and would later make his own translation. Get the Adlington version here: https://archive.org/details/goldenass...
Mark Carter added this note
The influence of Greek Orphism in TWG derives mainly from the works of Edward Davies and Jane Harrison. For a better understanding of Graves' Orphic thought see the thesis “The Origin, Evolution, and Function of the Myth of the White Goddess” by Davis. Get it here: https://dspace.stir.ac.uk/handle/1893...
Mark Carter added this note
Nash translates this as “I am a reciter of information/In Hebrew, In Greek/In Greek, In Hebrew” Nash slyly remarks that knowledge of Hebrew and Greek are “remarkable accomplishments for the Welsh Druids of the sixth century.” Exactly when the Taliesin material was written and the education level of the authors is a main point of contention in TWG. (Cf. Nash's Taliesin p291)
Mark Carter added this note
The Welsh People (1900) by Brynmor-Jones and Rhys was a historical study which expanded on their earlier Reports of the Royal Commission on Land In Wales & Monmouthshire. Get it here: https://archive.org/details/welshpeop...
Mark Carter added this note
Secret Languages of Ireland (1937) was a major source for TWG. It only dedicates one chapter to ogham, but it also dedicates a chapter to cryptography. Macalister was critical of older theories suggesting that ogham concealed druidic messages, but his study of ogham and cryptography in the same book fueled the speculative side of Graves' ogham theories.
Mark Carter added this note
Graves claims this quote comes from the MA, but it doesn't. The MA gives the original Welsh (which Graves couldn't read.) This English translation can be found in the Guest Mabinogion, Nash's Taliesin, and Skene's Four Ancient Books. The 1st 2 are known sources for Graves. The last is a likely source which he perhaps failed to document.
Mark Carter added this note
Graves discusses his own use of “magic mushrooms” in several works. A good starting point would be his essay collection Difficult Questions, Easy Answers. Ritual drug use in ancient paganism also influenced his interpretation of Greek myths in his book The Greek Myths.
Mark Carter added this note
A translation of The Grand Bardic Academy can be found in The Bardic Source Book by John Matthews. Bear in mind, the story is a late comic tale full of parody of Celtic hospitality customs and ludicrous exaggerations in the vein of old Celtic tales. It's perhaps not a good source to base an argument upon. Similarities between it and other Celtic tales are almost certainly intended as parody.
Mark Carter added this note
It should be remembered that the Myvyrian Archaiology is written mostly in Welsh, which Graves couldn't read. When reading the M.A. for those parts Graves used, a focus on the English sections would be best. Get the Myvyrian Archaiology here: https://archive.org/details/myvyriana...
Mark Carter added this note
Edward Davies' Celtic Researches had profound impact on Graves' writing of TWG. There's more than can be placed into this footnote. Hutton's Blood and Mistletoe contains info on him and my own book Stalking The Goddess covers much of his influence on TWG. Get Davies book here: https://archive.org/details/celticres...

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