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The Forecast for Tomorrow: The UK's climate for change

The Forecast for Tomorrow: The UK's climate for change

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Published by Oxfam
This report is a snapshot of a country deeply torn by good and bad climate policies and actions among business, public and government – with each group inextricably bound by the actions of the others. Whether the UK succeeds in achieving its emissionsreduction targets and in becoming a leader in international climate negotiations depends on whether good or bad policies prevail. At stake are the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world, who will suffer first and worst from climate change despite being the least responsible for it.
This report is a snapshot of a country deeply torn by good and bad climate policies and actions among business, public and government – with each group inextricably bound by the actions of the others. Whether the UK succeeds in achieving its emissionsreduction targets and in becoming a leader in international climate negotiations depends on whether good or bad policies prevail. At stake are the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world, who will suffer first and worst from climate change despite being the least responsible for it.

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Published by: Oxfam on Apr 12, 2011
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02/08/2013

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A snapshot of climate policies and practices, good and bad,that are pulling the UK in different directions, and of theorganisations holding the power to make a difference.
Be Humankind
The forecast for tomorrow: 
the UKs climate for change.
 
Contents
Executive summaryThe UK today: emissions
GOVERNMENT CASE STUDIES
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: leading by exampleGreater London Authority: an ambitious vision for 2025The Scottish Government: aiming for a low-carbon futureExport Credits Guarantee Department: fuelling emissions around the worldDepartment For Transport: promoting false solutions to emissionsDepartment for Business, Enterprise, and Regulatory Reform:incoherence threatens a green energy future
PRIVATE SECTOR CASE STUDIES
BT plc: leading the way in emissions cutsNational Grid: making the right connectionsMarks and Spencer: changing the retail climateRoyal Dutch Shell: burying its head in the (oil) sandsE.ON: ushering in a new coal eraConfederation of British Industry: weakening key climate policies
PUBLIC CASE STUDIES
Individual action: changing lifestylesCommunity action: acting locally, togetherPolitical action: we can create a climate for changeCynicism: what we believe and what we doIt’s not up to me: the deadly waiting gamePublic confusion about effective action: the plastic bag
Oxfam GB: ghting climate poverty around the world
3810111314161720212325272933343536373840
The forecastfor tomorrow:
the UK’s climate for change.
 
Executive summary 
The Forecast for Tomorrow 
is a snapshot of a country deeply torn by good and bad climatepolicies and actions among business, public and government – with each group inextricablybound by the actions of the others. Whether the UK succeeds in achieving its emissions-reduction targets and in becoming a leader in international climate negotiations dependson whether good or bad policies prevail. At stake are the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world, who will suffer rst and worst from climate change despitebeing the least responsible for it.Within the UK, some of the world’s best, most-inspiring progress in tackling climatechange is already happening. These solutions far and away outstrip the ambition of theweak carbon-reduction targets now being contested in international climate negotiations.They give great credence to the UK as a genuine world leader in tackling climate change.Conversely, at the same time, a powerful coterie of interests is locked together in the kindof dirty, regressive actions and policies that could undo this progress and derail the UK’semissions targets. They would also undermine the UK’s international standing and, if unchecked, will help lock the world into a future that will be catastrophic – particularlyfor the world’s poorest and most-vulnerable people.The ‘litmus test’ for which one of these competing behaviours will gain ascendancywill be the political decisions being made in the UK over the next few months. Theseinclude whether a new coal-red power plant at Kingsnorth, Kent gets the go-ahead; howprogressive the UK’s Climate Change Bill becomes; and whether UK’s renewable-energytargets will enable it to take a leading role in the EU. These decisions and the political,corporate and social climate they reect will have a huge bearing on the UK’s standing ininternational climate negotiations, both in Poznan, Poland in December 2008, and inCopenhagen, Denmark in 2009.As a leader on international development, the UK must also lead the way in tacklingclimate change to help relieve the impact of global warming on millions of poor people whoare being hit hardest, despite contributing least to the problem. The UK must support poorcountries and communities to adapt to the inevitable consequences of climate change. Butthe only way to prevent further violation of their rights to life, security, subsistence, food,and health is to keep global warming below 2°C. Rich countries must act now to reduceemissions; and this is why this document focuses on mitigating our climate impact. As theUK’s representative in the climate negotiations, Secretary of State for the Environment,Hilary Benn, says, ‘We must achieve a fair and substantive deal in Copenhagen. All myefforts will be dedicated to this task, and in the UK we will play our full part.’ South Africa’sMinister for the Environment, Marthinus van Schalkwyk, emphasises the desperate need forleadership on the international stage: ‘We know very well that there are many countries inthe G8 grouping that share our ambitious expectations, and therefore it is regrettable thatthe lowest common denominator in the G8 determined the level of ambition in the group’sdeclaration on climate change [at Hokkaido, Japan 2008].’The UK government’s leadership in international negotiations must be matched bydecisive action at home, to ensure the UK cuts emissions rst, fastest, and furthest. Thismeans recognising the positive inter-relationships happening now between public, privateand government behaviour and creating the conditions for these to ourish – while ditchingthe negative. The UK must set ambitious targets and put in place the means to achieve themif it is to play its part in averting global climate catastrophe. The decisions that thegovernment and the private sector take now, particularly in their energy and transportinvestments, with the public’s response, will determine the UK’s ‘climate forecast’ for thecrucial decades ahead.
“The climate is unpredictablenow. Some people in our village are being accused of putting a curse on the rain.But is it really people herewho are damaging the rainpatterns and our climate?”
Martina Longom, CaicaoanVillage, Uganda
“We are very surprised toknow that the UK, that weuse as a positive examplein putting climate change asa top priority on its agenda,has failed to do much on theground. If the UK fails, thenwhat can the rest of theworld do? This inaction isbeing realised by the rest of the World, and will de-motivate all countries,and especially developingcountries from making any future commitments.”
Wael Hmaidan, IndyAct –The League of IndependentActivists, Lebanon
“The UK government is noexception to the ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ relationship with theclimate-change issue. Bold actions to rethink trade and limits to growth arenecessary.”
Vanaja Ramprasad,researcher and nutritionist,India.
Executive summary 
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