Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Tar Heel Terrors Excerpt

Tar Heel Terrors Excerpt

Ratings: (0)|Views: 939|Likes:
Published by BlairPublisher
The 20-plus stories in this new collection by Michael Renegar, author of Roadside Revenants and Other North Carolina Ghosts and Legends, range geographically from the coast to the mountains of North Carolina. Some are retellings of classic Tar Heel ghost stories and legends, while others stem from the personal experiences of the author and his friends and family. Some stories are of the supernatural, some concern interesting curiosities, and others are just plain weird.

To learn more, visit: http://www.blairpub.com/alltitles/tarheelterrors.html
The 20-plus stories in this new collection by Michael Renegar, author of Roadside Revenants and Other North Carolina Ghosts and Legends, range geographically from the coast to the mountains of North Carolina. Some are retellings of classic Tar Heel ghost stories and legends, while others stem from the personal experiences of the author and his friends and family. Some stories are of the supernatural, some concern interesting curiosities, and others are just plain weird.

To learn more, visit: http://www.blairpub.com/alltitles/tarheelterrors.html

More info:

Published by: BlairPublisher on Apr 14, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

04/14/2011

pdf

 
Excerpt from
Tar Heel Terrors
by Michael Renegar 1The Little Red Man: Is He Back?Old Salem Village, Winston-Salem, North CarolinaModern-day Winston-Salem is one of North Carolina’s biggest and busiest cities, homeof the Reynolds tobacco dynasty and Krispy Kreme Doughnuts. Long before these companiescame to the area, it was actually two small towns: Winston and Salem. Salem was one of the firstof three Moravian settlements located on lands called the Wachovia Tract. The other settlementswere Bethabra and Bethania.People may be surprised that one of North Carolina’s most famous ghost stories comes tous from this humble, conservative Christian group. Some seem to believe being a person oChristian faith precludes belief in ghosts. That is nonsense!Andreas Kremser, a man of unusually short stature, moved from Pennsylvania, settling inBethabra in 1766. Six years later, Andreas moved to the larger settlement at Salem. There he wasassigned the job of chimney sweep.The Moravian culture is one of humility, sacrifice, and service. Andreas was quiteunhappy with his assigned duties. Apparently, he wasn’t the best chimney sweep either. Therewas a serious outbreak of measles, and whether rightly or wrongly, it was blamed on Andreas’sinsufficiently cleaned chimneys. Instead of humbly accepting criticism, Kremser grumbled thatmost of the chimneys were poorly constructed, and furthermore, the work load was too great for him alone.Thus Andreas did not remain the chimney sweep. He became a cook, but that didn’tsatisfy him either. Finally he became a shoemaker. This profession stuck and Andreas remaineda cobbler for the rest of his life. The little man in his red coat was a familiar sight around Salem.Like most unmarried Moravian men, Kremser lived in the Single Brothers’ House wherehe and the others learned many trades and participated in community service. Though sometimesabrasive, Andreas did his part, albeit with some grumbling. This seemed to amuse hiscompatriots rather than annoy them.The single brothers began excavating the cellar under their home in preparation for anaddition. Late one night after church services, tragedy struck. Andreas and the others begandigging out the lower portion of the earthen wall, expecting the overhanging upper part to falland be removed.One brother looked up and saw the dirt beginning to crumble and sag prematurely.Desperately, he cried out a warning. All but Kremser, who was on his knees digging deep in thewall, managed to get clear. The brothers watched in horror as the earth caved in. AndreasKremser was buried alive!Frantically, the brothers worked to free Andreas. Finally, after what seemed like aneternity, the men caught sight of their compatriot’s red coat. They pulled Andreas free. He wasstill alive but in great pain. One of his legs was terribly mangled, and they feared that he hadinternal injuries.A doctor was summoned, and he did his best to treat the gravely injured man but to noavail. Around 2:00 a.m., March 26, 1786, Andreas Kremser died at the age of thirty-three.Apparently, though, Andreas was not yet ready to slip this mortal coil and face his Creator.Not long after the accident, the men and boys in the Single Brothers’ House began to

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->