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Burzynski-WhatAbout

Burzynski-WhatAbout

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Published by: mpbucco on Apr 14, 2011
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07/20/2013

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Note from Michael Buccowich
Cancer
 
Doctor
 
Stanislaw
 
Burzynski
 
Sees
 
Himself 
 
as
 
a
 
Crusading
 
Researcher,
 
Not 
 
a
 
Quack 
 
By 
 
Craig
 
Maslow,
 
Houston
 
Press,
 
January 
 
01,
 
2009
 
This
 
is
 
most
 
comprehensive
 
article
 
I’ve
 
seen
 
on
 
Dr
 
Stanislaw
 
Burzynski,
 
who
 
claims
 
to
 
have
 
developed
 
a
 
cure
 
for
 
brain
 
cancer.
 
I
 
first
 
learned
 
about
 
Dr
 
Burzynski’s
 
method
 
after
 
Susan
 
had
 
two
 
brain
 
surgeries
 
and
 
treatment
 
with
 
chemo
 
and
 
radiation,
 
making
 
her
 
ineligible
 
for
 
his
 
clinical
 
trial.
 
The
 
idea
 
of 
 
coming
 
up
 
with
 
$20,000
 
or
 
so
 
needed
 
to
 
begin
 
treatment
 
in
 
Houston
 
became
 
moot.
 
One
 
leading
 
neuro
oncologist
 
I
 
spoke
 
with
 
at
 
UCLA
 
said
 
he’s
 
familiar
 
with
 
the
 
claims
 
and
 
controversy
 
associated
 
with
 
Dr
 
Burzynski.
 
He
 
remains
 
suspicious
 
until
 
Burzynski
 
subjects
 
his
 
research
 
to
 
the
 
standard
 
scientific
 
methods
 
used
 
by
 
oncologists
 
to
 
evaluate
 
novel
 
treatments
 
in
 
the
 
field
 
of 
 
brain
 
cancer.
 
 
Photos by Daniel Kramer
Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski has battledthe Food and Drug Administrationfor 30 years trying to get itsapproval for his cancer treatment.
Courtesy of Timothy GorskiM.D.
Dr. Timothy Gorski says Burzynskiis "selling hope at a high price."
Subject(s):Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski
,
unproven cancertreatments
,
Food and DrugAdministration
,
Phase IIdrug trials
,
AmericanAcademy of Anti-Aging
By Craig Malisow 
published: January 01, 2009
If you were writing the story of Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski, he'd probably wantyou to start with him leaving Poland for America with $15 and a dream.He'd want it to end with him curing cancer.The events in between would describe a man leaving behind an oppressiveregime for what he thought was a sanctuary for medical research — only todiscover that U.S. authorities were even worse than the Communists. Pageafter page would show authorities trying to shut him down, trying to put himin jail. But he would persevere, bolstered by the testimonies of patients whocome to his Houston clinic from all around the globe. Husbands, wives, sons,daughters — condemned to death by conventional medicine, but saved by Burzynski.The preferred ending — the one where the U.S. Food and DrugAdministration approves his treatment — would be about vindication after30 years of fighting the system. It would show how closed-mindedbureaucrats with a grudge cost thousands upon thousands of lives.He wouldn't want you to suggest there's plenty of blame to go around. Hewouldn't want you to stand that scenario on its head, to where it's Burzynski,not the government, refusing to share his treatment with the world unless hewas able to do it his way, and his way only. Then, all the money he's madefrom patients who mortgaged homes and held fund-raisers in order to seehim might not seem so justified.But what he really wouldn't want is an alternate ending. One where, whenyou swap testimony for science, his treatment isn't effective after all.Because then people might pin those thousands of lost lives on him._____________________Last December, the FDA granted orphan drug status to Burzynski for the
Houston http://www.houstonpress.com/content/printVersion/10557891 of 9 4/28/2010 11:24 AM
 
Medicine
,
anti-wrinkletreatments
treatment of gliomas, a group of brain tumors that are hard to treat andquick to kill.Generally, orphan status provides extra benefits — such as extended patent protection — to drugdevelopers targeting diseases affecting fewer than 200,000 people.It's the latest highlight of a saga that began in 1967, when a 24-year-old Burzynski identified certainpeptides — chains of amino acids — in blood and urine. He found that people suffering with cancertypically had lower levels of these peptides, and he hypothesized that these agents might be thefoundation of a nontoxic cancer treatment.He called the peptides "antineoplastons," and the more he researched, the more optimistic hebecame. He continually drew his own blood, and that of his extremely accommodating family members, to the point where the volume couldn't keep up with his research needs. So he collectedurine samples, at one point taking them from public restrooms, until he figured out a way tosynthesize the antineoplastons. (Some critics laugh at this pee-based research; one wonders if, inanother age, they would have snickered at the scientist who became oddly enamored of the bacteria-fighting ability he supposedly found in some mold in a petri dish he forgot to clean).In 1970, three years after graduating from the Medical Academy of Lublin, Burzynski emigrated to theUnited States and took a position as researcher and associate professor at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. With the help of a grant from the National Cancer Institute, Burzynskicontinued his antineoplaston research. But when a grant renewal was denied in 1976, Burzynskidecided that if he wanted to see his theory through to the end, he would have to do it on his own.But first he had to find out if it was even legal to manufacture, sell and administer antineoplastons inTexas. As a later court order would detail, Burzynski asked officials at the Texas Department of StateHealth Services if he could legally treat patients with antineoplastons.The court order, which included a history of the steps he took in opening the clinic, states that theofficials gave him a verbal green light, but never gave written consent.Based on what the officials told him, he opened a private practice and research lab in a business park near the Westchase area. His work was not exactly inconspicuous; urine was delivered to a warehousevia tank trailer, dumped into an outdoor 3,500-gallon container, then filtered and transferred to anuncovered 450-gallon mixing tank. From there, it went through a more complex synthesizationprocess. At another facility in Stafford, the stuff went through additional testing before it was bottled.In 1978, two FDA officials visited Burzynski and told him he was breaking federal law: The agency believed that antineoplastons could only be administered via Phase I clinical trials, which measure adrug's safety. Neither party realized it, but that visit was the beginning of a convoluted 20-year legalbattle that would be fought in state and federal courts.After the 1978 warning, Burzynski took an unexpected course for a man under FDA scrutiny. As, forexample, appearing on
20/20
with Geraldo Rivera. And then, in 1983, upgrading the Stafford facility,which was rebranded the Burzynski Research Institute, Inc.Besides allowing the write-off of certain expenses, the Institute provided employment for his wifeBarbara, a fellow Medical Academy of Lublin graduate and former research assistant in Baylor'spediatrics department. Husband and wife became co-directors.Burzynski also recruited his brother Tadeusz, a construction supervisor with degrees from Poland's
Houston http://www.houstonpress.com/content/printVersion/10557892 of 9 4/28/2010 11:24 AM

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