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The College Hill Independent: April 14, 2011

The College Hill Independent: April 14, 2011

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Published by: The College Hill Independent on Apr 15, 2011
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THE COLLEGE HILL
INDEPENDENT
VOLUME XXII, ISSUE 9APRIL 14, 2011BROWN/RISD WEEKLY
 Al Jazeera // 
3
Voodoo
// 9
Fur 
 // 11
 
THE INDY IS:
MANAGING EDITORS Gillian Brassil, Erik Font, Emily Martin • NEWS Emily Go-golak, Ashton Strait, Emma Whitford • METRO Emma Berry, Malcolm Burnley,Alice Hines, Jonah Wolf • FEATURES Belle Cushing, Mimi Dwyer, Eve Blazo, KateWelsh • ARTS Ana Alvarez, Maud Doyle, Olivia Fagon, Alex Spoto • LITERARYKate Van Brocklin • SCIENCE Maggie Lange • SPORTS/FOOD David Adler, GregBerman • OCCULT Alexandra Corrigan, Natasha Pradhan• LIST Dayna Tortorici •STAFF WRITER Erica Schwiegershausen • CIPHRESS IN CHIEF Raphaela Lipin-sky • COVER/CREATIVE CONSULTANT Emily Martin • X Fraser Evans • ILLUS-TRATIONS Annika Finne, Becca Levinson • DESIGN Maija Ekey, Katherine Entis,Mary-Evelyn Farrior, Emily Fishman, Maddy Jennings, Eli Schmitt, Joanna ZhangPHOTOGRAPHY John Fisher, Annie Macdonald • SENIOR EDITORS KatieJennings, Tarah Knaresboro, Erin Schikowski, Eli Schmitt, Dayna Tortorici, AlexVerdolini
COVER ART Fraser EvansX PAGE Myles O’Donnell LawsonContact theindy@gmail.com for advertising information. // theindy.org
e College Hill Independent receives support from Campus Progress/Centerfor American Progress. Campus Progress works to help young people — advo-cates, activists, journalists, artists — make their voices heard on issues thatmatter. Learn more at CampusProgress.org.
A SEX COLUMN: THE ISSUE:
 News
WEEK IN REVIEW
p.2
by Emily Gogolak, Anna Matejcek, and Ashton Strait
AL JAZEERA: THE ARAB WORLDAND POPULAR OPINION IN FLIX
p.3
by Emma Whitford
Arts
A MAGIC OPERATION
p.9
by Annika Finne
Occult
THE ONENESS OF BEING
p.12
by Alexandra Corrigan and Dia Barghouti
Metro
EYE SPY
p.5
by Alice Hines
Features
A BRIEF CONSIDERATION OF TROPICAL DISEASES
p.7
by Gillian Brassil
FROM THE EDITORS:EPHEMERA:
Tryin’ to catch me riding dirty
Dirty talk comes in many forms, and no two people sexy-babble alike
—s
o whetheryour mouth is a fountain of filth in the bedroom or as tightly sealed as a zipperedgimp mask, don’t worry
,
because you’re normal. Whether you’re naughty ornice, you can spice up your boudoir routine with some linguistic encouragement.“Dirty talk” often springs from a well-liquored tongue revealing raw sexual de-sires you might not usually share or unusually obscene enthusiasm, but to becomea Zen sex master is to meditate on the internal source of these desires and pro-claim them with confidence.So if you’re trying to get down and dirty, own your urges and keep in mind thatsexy babble is a form of semi-serious intimacy requiring comfort and a level of trust from all parties involved. Take it slow, keep it real, and let your creative juices flow.
Bediquette:
It is polite to express one’s pleasure during a sexual act. It is ad-visable to use caution, however when boldy proclaiming your darkest fantasies,especially with new partners. When asked to talk dirty or reveal your secret fanta-sies, always start vanilla and work your way to chocolate
or even a banana split…If you want to tell me your secret fantasies or have a burning question eating atyour soul, email
sexanonymous1@gmail.com
and someone will get back to youshortly.
 Metro editor Malcolm Burnley reporting on “Hypocrisy at the Home Show” (4/7/11)
UP TO SPEED
p.13
by Belle Cushing
RECONSIDERING REAL FEEL
p.11
by Maud Doyle
Opinions
FOOD FIGHT
p.15
by Fraser Evans, Jared McGaha, and Wilson Foster
Literary
A CONTRAST, A KENNING OR UNTITLED.
p.17
by Robert SandlerLast summer, I had occasion to drink alcohol in a bar. I was with a friend of mine, andtwo of her friends, and they had just come from a stand-up comedy performance. Iopened with what I thought was a totally reasonable rhetorical question: “Doesn’tstand-up make you feel uncomfortable? Like, isn’t it just people up there trying *sohard* and like, kind of being funny, but mostly struggling?” Turns out both of the newfriends were aspiring stand-up comics. I was embarrassed.On Wednesday night, I had the opportunity to watch Michael Ian Black, KevinAllison (both alums of MTV’s hit-and-miss 90s sketch comedy show “The State”), andsundry Brown University personalities perform at something called “RISK!”, whichwas not a board game event. Instead, it was like a comedy inflected version of TheMoth; everyone got up and told stories. It was kind of cool. Kevin Allison’s impres-sion of Michael Showalter (another “The State” veteran) was the best part. But I hadan epiphany as I watching.Over spring break, in Portland OR, I had an opportunity to go to a ‘cool,’ ‘pro-gressive’ strip club. Allegedly (i.e. don’t fact-check this) Portland has the most stripclubs per capita of any city in America. So there’s cool ones. The epiphany at the stripclub—it wasn’t about feminism—was that watching someone strip was a lot like watch-ing stand-up comedy. It’s kind of awkward. And to do it well just means that youraudience is so affected that they don’t notice you trying really hard. Which is fine, un-less you’re not that good at it—stripping, or telling jokes. When someone’s not good,at least for me, I am just thinking about what the person is feeling, and not happilyobjectingfying/laughing at them.I write this because, after sitting in an auditorium watch people telling jokes to tryto make me laugh for 1.1 hours, I ended up in front of a computer, where I noticed thatone of the trending topics on Twitter right now is #YouLookedGoodUntil, yieldedsuch delightful tweets as: Diibbz305 #YouLookedGoodUntil I found out yo ass can’tcook! or WHOsDiamondMind #YouLookedGoodUntil you hit from the bong andcoughed the bong water+your spit all over me. . .or JaeThaAlien #youlookedgoodun-til the next morning! i turned over n all i saw was BOOGA BOOGA BOOGA!!!! LOL.Then I actually lolled, all without having to worry about whether Jae Tha Alienis trying too hard, or feels insecure about his performance as a comic/stripper.
–EJS
 
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APRIL 14 2011 | THE COLLEGE HILL INDEPENDENT | www.THEINDY.org
NEWS
| 2
SOMEONE STICKS UP FOR IMMI-GRANTS, FINALLY
“I think things are going to go crazy onthis,” Utah Republican state Rep. StephenSandstrom told USA Today in March aboutthe recently passed state laws concerning il-legal immigration. Sandstrom had proposeda bill similar to Arizona’s infamous SB 1070,whose anti-illegal immigrant sentiment causedthe federal government to sue the state to preventits enforcement. Sandstrom’s bill passed through theUtah legislature at the same time as the guest-workeract, a bill which would allow illegal immigrants whocurrently lived and worked in Utah to receive guestworker permits—essentially legalizing their residencyin the state, though they would remain subject to de-portation by federal immigration officials.Yet in this reddest of red states, it was the guest-worker act that passed with all its key provisions intact.In fact, Sandstrom was so appalled by the watering-down of his proposal’s measures that he skipped thesigning ceremony in protest.Utah has a long history of leniency towards illegalimmigrants that might have predicted this political up-set. For example, illegal immigrants in Utah can get“driving privilege” cards to obtain car insurance, andthey are also allowed to pay in-state tuition at publicuniversities. Despite the overwhelmingly conserva-tive political climate of the state, the Latter Day Saintschurch’s compassionate stance on immigration as wellas the large, imbedded immigrant population havecombined to foster relatively liberal attitudes towardimmigration reform issues.Unfortunately, Sandstrom’s predictions of con-troversy may still ring true. There are many Republi-cans gearing up to oust those legislators who supportedthe guest-worker act in the next election. The guestworker bill is also still awaiting federal approval, a nec-essary step because the law violates the federal govern-ment’s mandate that it is illegal to knowingly hire anillegal immigrant.Still, what Sandstrom is calling “an absolute trag-edy for the state of Utah” has been hailed by many as awelcome step forward in the immigration debate. Re-publican state Sen. Chris Bramble told the LA Times,“Something has got to break the gridlock on immigra-tion policy in the United States. If we’ve done nothingmore than push the debate further down the road thana year before, it’s hard to say that’s bad for the coun-try.”
–ASGOODBYE, GLENN BECK!
Last Wednesday, Fox News announced thatit will drop Glenn Beck’s TV program—ap-propriately titled “The Glenn Beck Show”—bythe end of this year. Known to some as a bravedefender of American freedom, and to others asan erratic, gloom-and-doom conspiracy theorist,Beck has filled the network’s 5pm slot since early2009. At the peak of Beck’s popularity last year, overthree million viewers tuned in each evening to hear himcriticize Obama and voice his suspicions of social jus-tice—something Beck believes to be a “code word” forCommunism and Nazism.TV’s conservative wunderkind, however, appearsto have reached the end of his golden years. Beck’sviewership has dropped to approximately 1.6 millionover the past year, and his credibility, already consid-ered shaky by many, has been seriously undermined.A series of inflammatory statements made by Beck inlate 2009, in which he labeled Obama a “racist” with a“deep-seated hatred of white people,” prompted bothFox News and the larger conservative political commu-nity to begin re-evaluating their relationships with Beck.In response to the TV host’s incendiary criticismof Obama, Color of Change, an online advocacy groupdedicated to strengthening the political voice of African-Americans, organized an advertising boycott of “TheGlenn Beck Show.” The boycott has since convincedmore than 300 advertisers to deny Fox News their ad-vertising dollars, costing the network millions and, ac-cording to Color of Change, pushing Fox News’s TV ex-ecutives to view “Beck’s increasingly erratic behavior asa liability to their ratings and their bottom line.”In addition to the revenues Beck’s provocativestatements have cost Fox News, several conservativeshave raised questions about the effect this debacle mighthave on the conservative movement at large. Washing-ton Post columnist Jennifer Rubin claims that “Beck isout of fashion in a time of increasingly mature conserva-tive leadership. Now is not the time for rants and con-spiracy theories.”While it is not surprising that Beck’s conspiracytheories and unfounded accusations have irreparablydamaged his credibility among both Democrats and Re-publicans, it does seem premature to assume that thiswill tone down rhetoric among the American conserva-tive leadership. From snide comments about Obama’smasculinity made by the “Republican Mean Girls,” tothe conservative—and potential GOP candidate—Don-ald Trump’s refusal to recognize Obama’s birth certifi-cate, it looks like the red-herrings and rhetoric are hereto stay, for conservatives and liberals alike.
–AM
 
by Emily Gogolak, AnnaMatejcek, and AshtonStrait
A HANDFUL OF CHERRIES MAKES THE MEDI-CINE GO DOWN
The next time you open your medicine cabinet andreach for the Advil, you may want to take a look in yourfruit basket instead. A report presented at the Experi-mental Biology annual meeting in DC this week added anew topping to the standard list of painkillers: cherries.Researchers at Michigan State University, wherethe study was conducted, found that the cherry is notonly full of anti-oxidants (and great with vanilla), butis also an anti-inflammatory powerhouse. What makesthe cherry, well, the cherry may in fact be the culprit;the report reveals that anthocyanins, responsible forthe fruit’s bright red color, are also responsible for itspain-relieving properties. Dr. Muralee G. Nair, lead re-searcher and Professor at the University, was confidentin what he calls “the cherry effect.” His lab results showthat consuming 20 tart cherries would reduce pain. “Itis as good as ibuprofen,” he said.In fact, it may be better. Recent research has re-vealed unsettling statistics on the serious side effectsfrom common pain relievers or “non-steriodal anti-in-famatory drugs’ (NSAIDs) According to the Annals of Internal Medicine, NSAIDS—which include over-the-counter options like ibuprofen, Motrin, Aspirin—areresponsible for an estimated 7,600 deaths and 76,000hospitalizations in the U.S. every year.So if you’re hurting, grab a handful, think of GeorgeWashington, and remember that killing pain is a wholelot sweeter than it used to be.
–EG
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