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Sister by Rosamund Lupton - Excerpt

Sister by Rosamund Lupton - Excerpt

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3.85

(407)
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When her mom calls to tell her that Tess, her younger sister, is missing, Bee returns home to London on the first flight. She expects to find Tess and give her the usual lecture, the bossy big sister scolding her flighty baby sister for taking off without letting anyone know her plans. Tess has always been a free spirit, an artist who takes risks, while conservative Bee couldn’t be more different. Bee is used to watching out for her wayward sibling and is fiercely protective of Tess (and has always been a little stern about her antics). But then Tess is found dead, apparently by her own hand.

Bee is certain that Tess didn’t commit suicide. Their family and the police accept the sad reality, but Bee feels sure that Tess has been murdered. Single-minded in her search for a killer, Bee moves into Tess’s apartment and throws herself headlong into her sister’s life—and all its secrets.

Though her family and the police see a grieving sister in denial, unwilling to accept the facts, Bee uncovers the affair Tess was having with a married man and the pregnancy that resulted, and her difficulty with a stalker who may have crossed the line when Tess refused his advances. Tess was also participating in an experimental medical trial that might have gone very wrong. As a determined Bee gives her statement to the lead investigator, her story reveals a predator who got away with murder—and an obsession that may cost Bee her own life.

A thrilling story of fierce love between siblings, Sister is a suspenseful and accomplished debut with a stunning twist.

To read more about Sister or Rosamund Lupton please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.
When her mom calls to tell her that Tess, her younger sister, is missing, Bee returns home to London on the first flight. She expects to find Tess and give her the usual lecture, the bossy big sister scolding her flighty baby sister for taking off without letting anyone know her plans. Tess has always been a free spirit, an artist who takes risks, while conservative Bee couldn’t be more different. Bee is used to watching out for her wayward sibling and is fiercely protective of Tess (and has always been a little stern about her antics). But then Tess is found dead, apparently by her own hand.

Bee is certain that Tess didn’t commit suicide. Their family and the police accept the sad reality, but Bee feels sure that Tess has been murdered. Single-minded in her search for a killer, Bee moves into Tess’s apartment and throws herself headlong into her sister’s life—and all its secrets.

Though her family and the police see a grieving sister in denial, unwilling to accept the facts, Bee uncovers the affair Tess was having with a married man and the pregnancy that resulted, and her difficulty with a stalker who may have crossed the line when Tess refused his advances. Tess was also participating in an experimental medical trial that might have gone very wrong. As a determined Bee gives her statement to the lead investigator, her story reveals a predator who got away with murder—and an obsession that may cost Bee her own life.

A thrilling story of fierce love between siblings, Sister is a suspenseful and accomplished debut with a stunning twist.

To read more about Sister or Rosamund Lupton please visit Crown Publishing Group at www.crownpublishing.com.

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Publish date: Jun 7, 2011
Added to Scribd: Apr 18, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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08/21/2013

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This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are theproduct of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actualpersons, living or dead, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.Copyright ©
2010
by Rosamund LuptonAll rights reserved.Published in the United States by Crown Publishers, an imprint of the CrownPublishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc., New York.www.crownpublishing.com
crown
is a trademark and the Crown colophon is a registered trademarkof Random House, Inc.Originally published in paperback in Great Britain by Piatkus Books, an imprint of Little, Brown Book Group, a Hachette UK Company, London, in
2010
. Published byarrangement with Piatkus, an imprint of Little, Brown Book Group UK.The verse on page
72
is from “In the Bleak Midwinter” by Christina Rossetti(
1830
 –
1894
). The verse on page
225
is from “Sleep, Baby Sleep” (traditional).Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataLupton, Rosamund.Sister : a novel / Rosamund Lupton. —
1
st American ed.p. cm.
1
. Sisters—Fiction.
2
. Sisters—Death—Fiction.
3
. Murder—Investigation—Fiction. I. Title.PR
6112
.U
77
S
57
 
2011823
'.
92
 —dc
22
 
2010025327
ISBN
978
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0
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307
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71651
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4
eISBN
978
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0
-
307
-
71653
-
8printed in the united states of america
 Book design by Elizabeth Rendfleisch Jacket design by Laura Duffy  Jacket photography by ML Harris/Getty Images
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First American Edition

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melissarochelle_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Read from June 12 to 14, 2011I stayed up way too late because I had to finish this book! The narrative is told through Beatrice's letter to her sister Tess...and I don't want to ruin it so you just have to read it! But you're given hints along the way, but then it's like, "BAM! Fooled ya!"
pidgeon92_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This was a great read, though I didn't care for the genetic therapy angle of the story. It didn't fit for me.
bsquaredinoz reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Sister is narrated by Beatrice, a twenty-something woman who has flown home to London from her life in New York because her younger sister, twenty-one year old Tess, has gone missing. Beatrice, or Bee as Tess would call her, writes a letter to her sister which in part describes the events surrounding her disappearance and in part is a memoir of their sisterhood, warts and all.

The book is basically a love letter from one sister to another and in that context it is a superb piece of writing. It delves into all the nuances of the relationship; the shared memories (good and bad), the slights (real and imagined), the words that were said and those that would have been taken back should the universe allow. It is a marvellous portrait of both the bond between the two sisters and the grief one feels at the unexpected disappearance of the other.

Where Tess is fun-loving, gregarious and artistic, Beatrice is reserved, seeks security and does not normally stand up for herself but over the course of the story Beatrice goes through a fairly fundamental shift in her personality which is, again, credibly drawn out. We also see Beatrice develop a deeper understanding of her mother’s motivations for various actions and behaviour and this relationship too is an interesting one to watch as it develops into one of adult equals more than parent and child.

I must admit I found the whodunnit element of the book less successful. It was so clunky in a couple of places I actually wondered someone (author or publisher) had pushed to squeeze the manuscript more deeply into a genre (I thought the prominently positioned pull quote from Jeffrey Deaver on the edition I read was serving the same, somewhat misguided, purpose). I’m out of touch with what’s hot in publishing circles right now but I think this would have been just as good a book, perhaps an even better one, without this somewhat clumsy element.

Nevertheless I enjoyed the book as a whole because the relationship of the sisters is depicted with a finesse and thoughtfulness you rarely see, particularly from a début author. I also had the added bonus of an outstanding narration of the audio book by Juanita McMahon. I’d read the first chapter or so of the book in print form (on someone else’s kindle) before reaching the top of the library’s audio queue (long before I was ever going to get near the top of the print queue). McMahon’s depiction of Bee was just as I had imagined.

My rating 3.5 stars
poetreegirl reviewed this
Rated 4/5
When Beatrice's sister is found dead, authorities rule it a suicide. Beatrice refuses to believe that her sister would take her own life and tries to reconstruct her last days to discover the truth. The people she meets, and the secrets she uncovers will keep you guessing until the very end.
easyed_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Excellent first novel by Rosamund Lupton. An emotional page turner from the beginning phone call of her sisters disappearance, her search for answers about Tess's final days, her burial, and swirling conclusion, leaves you wanting to wrap your arms around Bee as she uncovers things about herself through her sister. You won't be disappointed.
littleton_pace reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Refreshingly brilliant in my opinion!I've gone through a spate of sub-par horrible books in my To-Read pile lately, and I was worried about this one, too! I needn't have been. It's wonderful. And a lesson to authors how to create 3D characters even if they have the smallest role in the story. I normally am free with spoilers in my reviews, but I'll hold off this time because I think it's worth the read to get the pay off that I got by the end of the book. I will say that it's not much of a light-hearted read, but it is exciting and definitely a page-turner.If you're looking for a good one-off book to read, this is it!
redbookreviews reviewed this
It can be said that most people have experienced a love so deep it connects one soul to another. This connection is not necessarily reserved for lovers, or even a mother and child, it can be between any two people really. As it so happens, souls are not choosy by nature, only we are.Some people when faced with losing a loved one simply accept and move on. Others refuse death knowing it was brought upon the beloved without mercy and with ill intent. Beatrice knows the latter is true because Beatrice knows her sister better than she knows herself.After flying across the Atlantic ready to release the admonishment required when a younger sibling is reckless and too carefree. Older conservative and controlled sister Beatrice discovers an awful truth. Her sister is not simply too busy to call or check in, she is not missing. She is gone forever.Beatrice knows her sisters absence is not so easily explained as the authorities would like her to believe, so she begins a relentless search for answers. Tess may have been carefree but she was loving and kind, and most importantly she was going to be a mother in just a few weeks. Beatrice embarks on her own grief driven search for the truth, but what she finds is a complicated web of lies and confusion. Worse yet, she begins to doubt if she really knew her sister at all as she discovers she barely knows herself.
schatje_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Having recently read and enjoyed Lupton’s second novel, "Afterwards", I decided to read her debut novel.Beatrice’s younger sister, 21-year-old Tess, disappears. Beatrice rushes to London where Tess’s body is soon discovered. Her death is ruled a suicide but Bee adamantly refuses to believe this explanation; suspecting foul play, she sets out to do her own investigation. The novel is written as a long letter from Bee to Tess detailing her struggle to learn how and why Tess died. This book is a psychological thriller with a twist at the end. Though the end may come as a surprise, a cursory re-reading shows numerous clues woven throughout the narrative. There is also sufficient suspense interwoven. The number of suspects with credible motives grows, although at times Bee seems to grasp at straws in her increasing frustration with the police and desperation to find her sister’s killer.Besides providing an interesting mystery, the book also touches on issues such as genetic therapy domestic abuse, and society’s perceptions of single mothers. The book’s strongest suit, however, is characterization. I loved Kasia, Tess’s Polish friend who wants to learn English but refuses “to learn the negative words, a linguistic head-in-the-sand policy. But on the positive ones she’s forging ahead, even learning colloquialisms.” Equally appealing is Amias, Tess’s elderly landlord, who plants Tess’s favourite daffodil bulbs in the frozen ground on a dark night.Of course it is the relationship between Bee and Tess that is at the heart of the novel. The two are foils in many ways. Bee is reserved and very security-conscious while Tess was unconventional, gregarious and artistic. As Bee investigates her sister’s death, she discovers that she and Tess were more similar that she had believed. Bee also examines her relationship with her sister and though others question whether their bond was as close as she believed, she has no doubts: “[Y]ou are my sister in every fiber of my being. And that fiber is visible – two strands of DNA twisted in a double helix in every cell of my body – proving, visibly, that we are sisters. But there are other strands that link us, that wouldn’t be seen by even the strongest of electron microscopes. . . . We are conjoined by hundreds of thousands of memories that silt down into you and stop being memories and become a part of what you are.”Bee is a dynamic character; she herself admits, “But, astonishingly, I’m not broken. I’m not destroyed. Terrified witless, shaking, retching with fear, yes. But no longer insecure. Because during my search for how you died, I somehow found myself to be a different person.” The author’s gradual revealing of this growth in Bee as she persists in her search for the truth gives this book another dimension.For a quick but absorbing read, this novel is definitely worth a try.
ridgewaygirl reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Rosamund Lupton's debut novel, is a crime novel in the style of Minette Walters. Beatrice's sister has gone missing and so Beatrice returns to England to find her. Living in her sister Tess's tiny and cold basement flat, Beatrice begins to lose hold of her secure American life. She's sure she's on the trail of what happened to her sister, even if the police are openly skeptical and her mother and fiancé think she's losing her grip on reality. Sister is told in the form of an interview she is doing with a lawyer in preparation for an upcoming trial. As she wades through her recent experiences, she reveals the facts to her interviewer, amplifying the story for the reader with her motivations and thoughts at the time. Beatrice does indeed succeed in finding out what really happened, but she does so in a scattershot way, following every clue or idea as far as she can, occasioning more than one complaint about her behavior. The police start out sympathetic, but quickly grow tired of her relentless pushing. This is an above average crime novel. I'm happy that there are several British writers willing to pick up where Ruth Rendell and PD James have left off. Sister was satisfyingly plotted and well-written, with a believable twist at the end that fit well with the story as a whole.
rmboland reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I downloaded this novel as an ebook on my phone, and was in no hurry to start it. I tend to prefer the feel and solid comfort an actual book lends to my hands, but have recently succumbed to ebooks for the convenience. After reading this book, I can honestly say that I'm glad I became a flexible reader.Sister wasn't crime fiction for me, it was beyond that in ways I can't describe without having to add a 'spoiler alert' to this review. Every one of the protagonist's heartstrings seemed to be connected to mine, and when hers where tugged, my own followed suit. This storyline was fast paced, and easily absorbed you into the set surrounding it. I was Beatrice's number one supporter as she sought to acquire knowledge about her sister's mysterious death. I couldn't swipe my fingers across the pages fast enough. One of the few books that left me wholly satisfied, beginning to end.

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