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Vol. 38, Issue 1

Vol. 38, Issue 1

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Published by The Rutgers Review
Featuring: College relationships, Toni Morrison, Writers Strike 2009, The Vivian Girls and Screaming Females meet the NBPD, "Save the Trees!", Original art by James Baduini.
Featuring: College relationships, Toni Morrison, Writers Strike 2009, The Vivian Girls and Screaming Females meet the NBPD, "Save the Trees!", Original art by James Baduini.

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Published by: The Rutgers Review on Apr 20, 2011
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04/20/2011

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T   E  
REVIEW
RUGERS
FEB 2009Vol. 38,Issue 1
 A C A D E M Y 
 A W A R D
 P R E D I C T I O N S
 C E N T E R F O L D  P O S T E R  b y  JAM E S  BA D U I N I
The S.W.A.T. Can’t Stop
The VIVIAN GIRLS &SCREAMING FEMALES
 T O N I M O R R I S O N
New Brunswick’sAmericanizationof Ethnic Food
 J i m m y  E a t  W o r l d ’ s  C l a r i t y  T u r n s  1 0 
 ( H o w  O l d  D o e s  T h a t 
M a k e  Y o u  F e e l ? )
GO GREEN:
Photocopy This
Magazine & SaveThe Trees!
(p.19)
 L i t t l e  K i d s  F i g h t i n g b y  P a t  H a n n o n
 
T   E  
REVIEW
RUGERS
EDI TORIAL
Ed i tor  in C h ie f DA VE RO THS TAD TCu l ture Ed i tor MERICHELLE  VILLAPANDOA&E Ed i tor ROB GUL YAMus ic Ed i tor ANDRE W SHELDONHumor Ed i tor  JON BERSHADBac kpage Ed i tor LIZZIE PLAUGICCop y Ed i tor MARISSA GRAZIADIOPres iden t ERIC  WEINS TEIN Treasurer SEAN NEILAr t D irec tors KELL Y HOLECHEK and AND Y  WOLF
COLUMNS
DanielLarkins JPMestanzaKeithEdwad NagyKain OxodElaine Tang
     A    R   T     &    D   E    S  I     G     N
Amanda Chin James Baduini Jeff Foster 
C    
O    
N     
 
T    E    
N    
 T     
S    
.   
2
Cover by JON BERSHAD
61419
Danielle RochodSean NewCaly SimmesPatHannon
One Year from the Writers’ Strike:
New Television for 2009 
by Keith Edward Nagy  
6
DVD Review: Summer Heights High
 
by Andrew Sheldon
Book Review: American Sublime
by Daniel Larkins
7
Save the Trees, Save the World 
by Carly Simmes!
19-20
Little Kids Fighting
by Pat Hannon
 
22
 
Welcome back to the Rutgers Review! It seems asthough a lot has gone down during our absence
these past two months. You’ll notice we have a fewnew names on the Editorial Board: Music Editor An
-drew Sheldon, Humor Editor Jon Bershad, BackpageEditor Lizzie Plaugic and Arts and Entertainment Edi-
tor Rob Gulya (now ofcial!), as well as a new presi
-dent, the very brave Eric Weinstein. Now that the
U.S. presidential election is nally over, we decided
to change the name of the Forum section to the Cul-ture section, allowing for less confusion over what
kind of commentary we’re looking for. Also, in thisissue, you will nd a 2 page poster by our past cover 
artists James Baduini. This will now be a reoccurringpart of the Review, so feel free to pull it out and hang
it on your wall. (Collect ‘em all!). If you are inter 
-ested in submitting your work for consideration, e-mail
TheRutgersReview@gmail.com.
We have even
established an ofcial Short Story section within
the Humor section. If you are interested in sub-mitting your work for THAT, then send it on over to
RutgersShortFiction@gmail.com.
While you’re
at it, let us know what you think of the Review.
Man, that’s a lot of info for such small type. Enjoythe new semester! It’ll be over before you know it!
-David RothstadtEditor-in-chief 
Comics! 
by Matt Korostoff, DaveRothstadt & Jon Bershad
21
FEB 2009Vol 38 Issue 1
Black History Month: Spotlight on Toni Morrison
by Rob Gulya
 
2
The Americanization of Ethnic Foods in New Brunswick 
by Daniel Larkins and JP Mestanza
 
3-4
Kiss and Tell:The Truth About College Cheating
by Merichelle Villapando 
5
OSCAR Predictions 
by Daniel Larkins, Rob Gulya JP Mestanza, Karin Oxford, Elaine Tang 
9-10
OSCAR Point Counterpoint:
by Rob Gulya &JP Mestanza 
8
ORIGINAL ART POSTER 
by James Baduini 
11-12
A New Wave CrashesInto 42nd Street
by Danielle Rochford 
13
 
Finally! Metallica Climbs BackUp The Metal Ladder 
by Marissa Graziadio 
14
The Tremulant Sings: A Retrospective
View on the Grammy Winning Mars Volta
by Sean New  
15
The Vivian Girls vs. ScreamingFemales vs. The New BrunswickS.W.A.T. Team
 by Dave Rothstadt 
16
Clarity X
by Andrew Sheldon
17
What’s Up With Knees Rich
Wasek? 
by Lizzie Plaugic
 
BackPage
Bonnaroo & Coachella
by Andrew Sheldon &Merichelle Villapando
18
 
2
 The Rutgers Review
FORUM
Toni Morrison, the rst African-American to be awarded theNobel Prize in Literature, and 1988 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize forher slave narrative “Beloved,” is among the most celebrated femalenovelists in history. Her novels are deeply entrenched in themesdealing with the broken connection between African-Americans,their past and their community, and the extent of human enduranceand spirit in the face of extreme circumstances. Typically giving herstarring roles to black females, one may nd it hard to imagine howa white male growing up in middle class New Jersey could connectwith these incredibly ery women vying for freedom and identity in aworld determined to keep them contained.The rst time I was introduced to Morrison was in my AP Englishclass my senior year in high school. While reading “Beloved” (a bookI would later reread and re-fall in love with), I confronted a passagethat struck me so hard that I had to physically place the book downand walk away. The passion had become too intense; the tension hadbecome too taught.After attempting tooccupy my mindwith other matters, Ireturned to “Beloved”still disturbed, butdrawn to continuereading. Perhaps I don’t know what it’s like to be a slave—perhaps Idon’t know what it’s like to be a mother faced with the choice of slav-ery or death, but Morrison’s powerful prose still penetrated, leavingme disturbed by the decision of the main character and distraught bythe circumstances forcing the decision.Since, I have reread it and moved on to read “Sula” and “Para-dise,” both of which also revolve around African-American womenrunning from pasts that refuse to be still. Infused with clearly denedemotions and pulsating with truth, Morrison’s novels invite the readerto play an active part.When speak-ing about the natureof the language of her novels, Morrisonstated, “Its functionis like a preacher’s tomake you stand up outof your seat, make youlose yourself and hearyourself. The worst of all possible things thatcould happen would beto lose that language.” Morrison forces the reader to feel the emotionsof her characters, giving her novels dimension and universal power.Perhaps I have never been a slave to a white man, or to society, or toa disturbed past refusing to allow escape, but Morrison forces thesefeelings on me—she forces me to feel them; she makes them real forme. I’ve walked away from each of these novels changed, and with anew perspective, not just on slavery and the lives of African-Ameri-cans, but the power of the human spirit both to endure as women of “Sula” do, and also to terrorize and scar as Schoolteacher does in theelds of Sweet Home. Few novelists have the power of Morrison toforce a white boy in New Jersey to feel the immense oppression andthe striving of human spirit borne by a black female in the heat of theJim Crow South.
ToniMorrison
By Rob Gulya
Spotlight on
Its function is like apreacher’s to make youstand up out of your seat,make you lose yourself and hear yourself. Theworst of all possible thingsthat could happen wouldbe to lose that language

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