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0201 Tesuji Dictoinary Selected

0201 Tesuji Dictoinary Selected

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Published by Wei Cheng

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Published by: Wei Cheng on Apr 23, 2011
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04/23/2011

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1
Our topic is both
separating
the opponent into two large groups and
cutting off 
the escape of invading stones. There are a number of terms that are used, butthe basic purpose is the same. By not allowing the opponents stones to connect,we look to gain some benefit.However, separating is such a basic technique that often it’s not necessary touse the sort of unusual shapes or clever order of moves that we call tesuji.Before examining tesuji that separate, lets look at a few examples of separatingthat don’t locally require “tesuji” per se.
T
ESUJI
 
FOR
S
EPARATING
A12B
Diagram 3: Sideways Bump
A21 DB EC
Diagram 2: Solid Descent
21 BCA
Diagram 1: Jump-DescentJumping to
w2
separates the whitestones on the left and right. Jumpingout with A instead would allowWhite B; a diagonal move at Black C would allow White to link up at
w2
. Black will now solidify territorywhile attacking to the left and right.Because
Z!
is high,
w2
is the strong-est way to separate White. Playingat A would give White
sabaki
(mak-ing flexible shape lightly) chanceswith B. Instead of 
w2
, if C, Whitecan play at
w2
; or, if Black D thenWhite E fortifies a weak group.If Black descends to A in this case,White B is good enough to giveBlack trouble. In such cases, thesideways bump with
w2
is effective.Black should bump the side hedoesn’t mind making stronger.Tesuji that Separate, that Prevent the Connection of the Opponent’s Stones
 
37
Problem 9: Jump
White to Play
The basic principle of pressing is to get out onestep in front of your opponent and press his headdown. However if you hurry to press youropponent’s head down, there are many cases inwhich you put wind in his sails instead.
C21AB34
Diagram 3:
Z!
is the tesuji.The jump to
Z!
is the move. If Black gives atariwith A, White can press down with the ko startingat B. If Black is going to play here he must choosethe slide at
w2
. Spreading out with
Z#
is fine; if surrounding conditions permit, White can considerthe pincer at
w4
.White still has the possibility of attaching at C toseal Black in. This is thanks to jumping out an extrastep at
Z!
.
4 2531A6
Diagram 2: Too HastyIt’s hard to expect success after hastily blockingwith
Z!
. Black crawls with
w2
and
w4
and then canplay
w6
. This is fine for Black. Instead of 
w2
, Black can also play an asking move with an atari at A.Neither the slack move in the previous diagram northe hasty move in the current diagram can be calledtesuji. Look for a moderate approach that dimin-ishes White’s weaknesses while pressing Black.
2A B134
Diagram 1:One Step Behind
Z!
lets Black run out with
w2
, leaving White a stepbehind. Instead of 
Z#
, it’s tempting to try to pincerBlack with a move around
w4
, but White doesn’thave eyes yet, so playing this way would be riskyand depends on surrounding circumstances. After
w4
, White can press at A, but this does not have abig impact.Instead of 
w2
, jumping to B fails due to a shortageof liberties.
 
120
T
ESUJI
 
FOR
M
AKING
Y
OUR
O
PPONENT
H
EAVY
A1CB 23
Diagram 3: Bump“Light” and “heavy” are among the more difficult go terms to understand. Onesimple expression of the concept is this: “heavy” refers to a lump of stones thatcannot easily be sacrificed. Therefore, when you attack, you want to make theopponent’s stones heavy so that he is less likely to be able to set up a trade.These tesuji are apt to be overlooked, but as your skill increases they becomemore and more necessary.However, be careful that you don’t strengthen your opponent instead of makinghim heavy. If you do, your attack will not succeed.
A1B2C3
Diagram 2:Pushing AlongPushing along against White with
w1
forces
Z@
, then
w3
attacks while taking profit along the side. Usuallythis white shape could be considered thickness, butin this case Black already has
\
in place as a pincer.Rather than thick, White is heavy. Instead of 
w1
, if Black A, then White at
w1
, Black B, White C, andthe attack has no effect.Bumping with
w1
forces White to stand with
Z@
,after which Black defends with
w3
. Instead of 
w1
, if simply A, B, or something similar, White can gofor a trade in the corner with C.Usually when you play from the inside to make youropponent heavy, you make moves that also serveone or more defensive purposes.
B1A32
Diagram 1:Diagonal AttachmentThis is a typical tesuji for making your opponentheavy. Black plays the diagonal attachment at
w1
,forcing White to stand at
Z@
, then Black attackswith
w3
. Just playing
w3
first lets White jump to the3-3 point at A—White is happy to make a tradehere. After the exchange of 
w1
for
Z@
, if White jumpsinto the corner with A, Black descends to B. Thecorner stones would be under pressure and the sideheavy.

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