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Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

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Leaves of Grass (1855) is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman. Among the poems in the collection are "Song of Myself", "I Sing the Body Electric", and in later editions, Whitman's elegy to the assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd". Whitman spent his entire life writing Leaves of Grass, revising it in several editions until his death. Source: Wikipedia.org
Leaves of Grass (1855) is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman. Among the poems in the collection are "Song of Myself", "I Sing the Body Electric", and in later editions, Whitman's elegy to the assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd". Whitman spent his entire life writing Leaves of Grass, revising it in several editions until his death. Source: Wikipedia.org

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Published by: Books on Apr 25, 2011
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Leaves of Grass, by Walt WhitmanThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Leaves of GrassAuthor: Walt WhitmanPosting Date: August 24, 2008 [EBook #1322]Release Date: May, 1998Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ASCII*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LEAVES OF GRASS ***Produced by G. FuhrmanLEAVES OF GRASSBy Walt WhitmanCome, said my soul,Such verses for my Body let us write, (for we are one,)That should I after return,Or, long, long hence, in other spheres,There to some group of mates the chants resuming,(Tallying Earth's soil, trees, winds, tumultuous waves,)Ever with pleas'd smile I may keep on,Ever and ever yet the verses owning--as, first, I here and nowSigning for Soul and Body, set to them my name,Walt WhitmanBOOK I. INSCRIPTIONS
 
One's-Self I SingOne's-self I sing, a simple separate person,Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse.Of physiology from top to toe I sing,Not physiognomy alone nor brain alone is worthy for the Muse, I saythe Form complete is worthier far,The Female equally with the Male I sing.Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power,Cheerful, for freest action form'd under the laws divine,The Modern Man I sing.As I Ponder'd in SilenceAs I ponder'd in silence,Returning upon my poems, considering, lingering long,A Phantom arose before me with distrustful aspect,Terrible in beauty, age, and power,The genius of poets of old lands,As to me directing like flame its eyes,With finger pointing to many immortal songs,And menacing voice, What singest thou? it said,Know'st thou not there is but one theme for ever-enduring bards?And that is the theme of War, the fortune of battles,The making of perfect soldiers.Be it so, then I answer'd,I too haughty Shade also sing war, and a longer and greater one than any,Waged in my book with varying fortune, with flight, advanceand retreat, victory deferr'd and wavering,(Yet methinks certain, or as good as certain, at the last,) thefield the world,For life and death, for the Body and for the eternal Soul,Lo, I too am come, chanting the chant of battles,I above all promote brave soldiers.In Cabin'd Ships at SeaIn cabin'd ships at sea,The boundless blue on every side expanding,With whistling winds and music of the waves, the large imperious waves,Or some lone bark buoy'd on the dense marine,Where joyous full of faith, spreading white sails,She cleaves the ether mid the sparkle and the foam of day, or undermany a star at night,By sailors young and old haply will I, a reminiscence of the land, be read,In full rapport at last.Here are our thoughts, voyagers' thoughts,

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