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Washington D.C. Afro-American Newspaper, April 30, 2011

Washington D.C. Afro-American Newspaper, April 30, 2011

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Published by: The AFRO-American Newspapers on Apr 28, 2011
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Volume 119 No. 38www.afro.com$1.00
Copyright © 2011 by the Afro-American Company
    a    f    r    o .    c    o    m
    Y    o    u    r    H    i    s    t    o    r    y   •    Y    o    u    r    C    o    m    m    u    n    i    t    y   •    Y    o    u    r    N    e    w    s
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47105 21847
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0 7
APRIL 30, 2011 - MAY 6, 2011
Hear the
 AFRO
on The DailyDrum, Wednesday at 7 p.m.
• Home Depot
INSERT
Join the
 AFRO 
onTwitter and Facebook 
Madea Returns
B3
Children’s Health on theChopping Block 
 A7
 –Opinion– 
ObamaReleases Full-Length BirthCerticateWho Should theRedskins Draftin 2011?B2
 A8
Continued on A8Continued on A8
By Valencia Mohammed
Special to the AFRO
Bachir Diop looked down the District’s H Street corridor atthe clusters of large wooden barricades, orange mesh tape andwarning signs that dominate the streetscape, evidence of the 12blocks of construction that have closed or crippled more than ahundred businesses and properties in four years and made wayfor new investors to acquire property at tax sales.“It’s devastating,” said Diop, owner of property on H Street.Diop is among a coalition of minority-owned businessesand property owners who claim that many longtime daytimeestablishments have folded due to four years of disruptiveconstruction on the H Street corridor. Many have suffered upto 100 percent loss of revenue due to customer access beingimpeded by road blocks, barricades, parking restrictions andzealous parking enforcement, they said.“The construction on H Street was more devastating tomy business than the crack epidemic in the ‘80s,” said JerryGoldkind, owner of a men’s clothing store in the 900 block of H St.Adding insult to injury, coalition members claim, taxassessments have risen as much as 350 percent in three years,forcing many businesses to end up in government tax sales.“If the minority-owned businesses are losing 75 percentof its customers due to the construction, why would thegovernment increase the tax rate except to push us out of business?” asked Pam Johnson, 49, a property owner.David Umansky, public information ofcer for the Ofceof Tax and Revenue (OTR), conrmed that in 2009, therewere 50 commercial and residential properties along the HStreet Corridor that went to tax sale and 56 properties in 2010.However, he disagreed that taxes should not have increased.
Minority-owned H Street Businesses Decry Tax Increases
By Erica Butler
 AFRO Staf Writer 
The parameters of Wards2, 7 and 8 must be modiedto meet federal requirements,D.C. Council memberssaid in the rst CouncilRedistricting Subcommitteehearing on April 25. Thecity’s population grew by5.2 percent since the 2000,totaling 601,723 in 2010.Ward 2 has nearly 80,000residents with Wards 7and 8 below the federalrequirement.The redistrictingcommittee, co-chaired byat-large Councilman MichaelBrown, must divide thecity into eight “compactand contiguous” wards,according to the DC OfcialCode. The model size foreach ward is 75,215 witha plus or minus 5 percentdeviation from that total,meaning each ward shouldinclude between 71,455 and78,976 people.“Boundaries for thewards must change,”said Ward 2CouncilmanJack Evans,who co-chairsthe redistrictingcommittee.And it may be adifcult process, he said.“Redistricting makes peoplevery angry.”Traditionally, redistrictinghas been controversial, assome neighborhoods want tomaintain their identity andbe represented by peoplethey have elected, such astheir ANC commissioneror councilmember.Residents in lower-incomeneighborhoods such asWards 7 and 8 want moreresidents, but fear thestigma of poverty andhomelessness in thoseareas will impact thedecision, which Ward8 CouncilmemberMarion Barry, D-Ward8, said should bestopped.Barry called theDistrict a racially,geographicallyand economicallydisheveled cityand said Ward 8 isusually a “dumpingground for the poor andmost vulnerable citizens”of D.C. Ward 8 had thelowest population totaling70,712.“We should useredistricting to address thelack of diversity in Ward8,” Barry told the
 AFRO
.“Moving the Ward 8
In Redistricting, Wards 2, 7, 8 Will Change
Map by Vickie Johnson
Continued on A3
By Erica Butler
 AFRO Staf Writer 
Vincent Orange (D) will likely be the next at-large D.C.councilman after beating eight other candidates, of whom onlyRepublican Patrick Mara came close in numbers during thespecial elections on April 26.With more than 55,000 voters at the polls, Orange raked ina little more than 28 percent of the votes, with Mara, the onlyRepublican candidate, trailing with about 26 percent, accordingto an early count. Speculators thought there would be a closerun between Orange and interim at-large Councilman SekouBiddle, who came in third with about 20 percent of votes.The SEIU MD/DC State Council, who has openly supportedBiddle, sent out a congratulatory statement to Vincent Orange,asking him to ght for transparency and pay attention tocontracts.“We congratulate Vincent Orange on his victory and callon him to join the Council’s effort to end an era of scandalsby expanding transparency,” the statement said. “Now morethan ever, DC should restore prosperity to working families byensuring that our tax dollars only create good jobs.”Orange, a lawyer and certied accountant who previouslyrepresented Ward 5 on the Council for two terms, campaigned
By Jamaal Abdul-Alim
Special to the AFRO
Not so long ago,Northwest D.C. orist KarenWoods could plan to spendabout $100 per week on gas tomake whatever deliveries sheneeded to make in the region.But with the recent surge ingas prices, the weekly cost of gas for Woods has more thantripled to close to $350.Woods says she isreluctant to raise deliveryfees and pass on the cost toher customers, particularlysince the vast majority of herbusiness is funeral work thatinvolves grieving familiesalready beset with the cost of funerals and burials. “I don’tthink the consumer should bepenalized,” said Woods, whoruns Mary Woods Florist,located on the 900 block of Kennedy St., N.W. “They’rein as much of a problem aswe are.”At the same time, Woodssaid, something has togive. “At the moment, I’mabsorbing it,” Woods said of the rising cost of gas. “But Idon’t think it’s exactly fair.”Woods’ predicamentrepresents what many D.C.business owners are facingas gas prices in the Districtcontinue to hover above the$4 mark, putting the Districtamong the four states in theU.S. where gas cost that muchor more.Among the most severely
 AP Photo/Susan Walsh
Gas prices above $5 a gallon are seen on a sign at a gasstation in Washington, Wednesday, April 20, 2011. Oilclimbed above $111 per barrel Wednesday as the dollarweakened and the government reported an unexpecteddrop in U.S. crude supplies. Gas pump prices also edgedhigher to $3.84 for a gallon of regular.
Gas Prices Put the Brake onLocal Businesses
Continued on A5
Orange UnofciallyWins At-Large Race,Based onEarlyResults
Continued on A8
 
 AP Photo
Seen here in 2004,while he served onthe D.C. Council,Vincent Orange maybecome the city’snewest at-largecouncilman, basedon an early ballotcount.By AFRO Sta 
The AFROAmericanNewspapers broughthome 10 Maryland,D.C., Delaware,(MDDC) PressAssociation awardsApril 22.Sports journalistStephen Riley ledthe
 AFRO
awardrecipients withthree awards. Rileywon two individualawards, one in thesports story categoryfor his “Gonzaga Clips DeMatha for ACIT Title” and theother in the online commentary or blog category for his “Is itOver Yet? Redskins Find New Ways to Disappoint.”But it was Riley’s team effort with Sports Editor PerryGreen that won best in show in the non-daily sports columncategory for “Faceoff: With John Wall In, Should GilbertArenas Stay or Go?”Washington Bureau Chief Zenitha Prince won in thefeature story category for her story “Life, Death Convergethrough Photographer’s Lens.”
AFRO Captures 10Press Assoc. Awards
Sports writers, Washington Bureau journalists, graphic designers andwebsite land awards
 
A2
 
The Afro-American, April 30, 2011 - May 6, 2011
NABJ Awards ‘Newsday’s’ Kimberley Martin,Emerging Journalist of the Year
Kimberley A. Martin, a reporter at
 Newsday
, was recentlyconferred 2011’s Emerging Journalist Award at the NationalAssociation of Black Journalists (NABJ) spring board of directors meeting.On Aug. 6, Martin and other honorees will attend theorganization’s Salute to Excellence Gala in Philadelphia duringNABJ’s 36th Annual Convention and Career Fair.Martin has been with the publication since November2007. The sports writer covers everything from Major LeagueBaseball to professional football and even NASCAR. - “I amhonored to win such a prestigious award. To know that mycolleagues value my work is as rewarding an honor as I couldimagine,” said Martin in a statement.Hank Winnicki, assistant managing editor of 
 Newsday’s
 sports section, wrote, “Kimberley has become an indispensablepart of the Newsday team. This is a prestigious national award,and everyone at Newsday is thrilled for Kimberley, she’s aterric writer and reporter and has handled every challengethrown her way. This honor is well-deserved.”Before coming to
 Newsday
, Martin wrote for
The Record 
 in New Jersey. She began her career in sports journalismafter earning a master’s degree in magazine, newspaper andonline journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of PublicCommunications at Syracuse University. She also holds abachelor’s degree in psychology and African-American studiesfrom Wesleyan University.
 NABJ’s 36th Annual Convention and Career Fair will take place August 3-7. For additional information, ticket sales, and registration, please visit us at www.nabj.org.
 
‘Poetry Man’ Singer Phoebe Snow Dies at 60
Blues singer Phoebe Snow, who made her mark in themusic industry with the 1974 hit “Poetry Man,” died fromcomplications of a brain hemmorrhage in Edison, N.J. on April26, her public relations representative told
the Associated Press
.She was 60.The singer suffered a stroke last year and faced blood clots,congestive heart failure and pneumonia, her manager, SueCameron, told
the AP
.The Grammy-nominated Snow released 16 albums and wasnominated for the best new artist Grammy Award in 1975.That same year, the Teaneck, N.J., native fell from thepublic consciousness after the birth of her daughter, who wasseverely brain-damaged. According to
the AP
, her husband leftthe family soon after the baby’s birth and Snow abandoned theindustry to care for her daughter Valerie Rose. She releasedher last album,
 Natural Wonder
, in 2003, two years after herdaughter’s death.Snow’s voice may have reached one of its largest audiencesin the late ‘80s with the popular sitcom jingle “A DifferentWorld.” The brief song, and soul star Aretha Franklin’s laterrendition, became synonymous with the show’s six-season run.Snow also lent her voice to the “Celebrate the Moments of YourLife” jingle for General Foods International Coffees.While Snow’s dark brown, tightly coiled hair led many fansto believe she was African American,
the AP
reports the singer,born Phoebe Ann Laub, was born to White Jewish parents. Shenever asserted or denied her ethnic background.
Civil Rights Groups Set Out to Fix BroadbandDisparities
Members of the Leadership Conference on Civil and HumanRights, an amalgam of national civil rights and labor groups,are sounding off on what they call “vast disparities” in minorityand underserved communities’ access to broadband Internet.In response to the Federal Communications Commission’s(FCC) request for commentary about improving broadbandaccess to these populations, the coalition asked the organizationto make greater use of programs like Lifeline and Link-Up,which offer low-income Americans discounts on phone billsand installation fees.“This access is critically important for success in the jobmarket, especially in a competitive job market where March2011 unemployment was 8.8 percent, Black unemploymentwas 15.5 percent and Latino unemployment was 11.3 percent.Broadband plays a critically important role in all parts of the jobspipeline – covering job readiness that includes obtaining skillsnecessary for a job, job placement that includes successfullyapplying for a job, and job progression that includes retrainingfor advancing through a job,” the coalition’s letter read.The letter also recommends the following steps to enhancethe breadth of Lifeline and Link-Up programs:- Move quickly to expand Lifeline and Link-Up to supportbroadband services that can support voice as well as otherapplications;- Expand Lifeline and Link-Up to support broadbandservices this year;- Create a nancial set-aside for competitive grants withinthe Lifeline program;- Expand and simplify eligibility rules, create incentiveswithin the program to reach target populations and reducewaste and fraud, and mandate combined outreach (and possiblyadministration) of this program with other similar programs.The American Civil Liberties Union, Asian AmericanJustice Center, Communications Workers of America, NationalUrban League, NAACP and National Coalition on Black CivicParticipation were among the organizations who signed the letter.
For more information visit www.civilrights.org.
Your History • Your Community • Your News
The Afro-American Newspapers
Baltimore Ofce • Corporate Headquarters2519 N. Charles StreetBaltimore, Maryland 21218-4602410-554-8200 • Fax: 1-877-570-9297www.afro.com
Founded by John Henry Murphy Sr., August 13, 1892Washington Publisher Emerita -
 Frances L. Murphy II 
Chairman of the Board/Publisher -
 John J. Oliver, Jr.
Executive Assistant -
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- 410-554-8222Receptionist -
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- 410-554-8200Director of Advertising/Sponsorship Development & Sales
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susangould@afro.com
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410-554-8246Sr. Advertising Account Executive -
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410-554-8235Advertising Account Executive
Marquise Goodwin -
410-554-8274Director of Finance
- Jack Leister -
410-554-8242Archivist
- John Gartrell -
410-554-8265Director, Community & Public Relations
Diane W. Hocker -
410-554-8243EditorialExecutive Editor -
Talibah ChikwenduE-mail: editor@afro.com
Managing Editor
- Kristin Gray -
410-554-8277
Washington Bureau Chief -
Zenitha Prince -
202-332-0080, ext. 119
E-mail: dceditor@afro.com
Global MarketsDirector -
Benjamin M. Phillips IV
- 410-554-8220
 bphillips@afro.com
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Edgar Brookins -
202-332-0080, ext. 116Baltimore Circulation/Distribution Manager
Sammy Graham -
410-554-8266Production Department
- 410-554-8288
Washington Ofce
1917 Benning Road, N.E. • Washington, D.C. 20002-4723202-332-0080 Fax: 1-877-570-9297
General Manager
Edgar Brookins -
ext. 116Ofce Administrator
- Mia Hayes-Hawkins -
ext. 112
Customer Service, Home Delivery and Subscriptions:
 
410-554-8234Customer Service@afro.comBilling Inquiries: 410-554-8226Nights and Weekends: 410-554-8282
*APR OFFERS: 0% APR FINANCING UP TO 60 MONTHS AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS THRU TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TOTAL FINANCED CANNOT EXCEED MSRP PLUS OPTIONS, TAX AND LICENSE FEES. 60 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $16.67 FOR EACH $1000BORROWED AT 0%, $17.48 FOR EACH $1000 BORROWED AT 1.9%, AND $17.92 FOR EACH $1000 BORROWED AT 2.9%.
NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY.
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NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY.
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
LEASE OFFERS: CAMRY DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES FIRST MONTHLY PAYMENT OF $239 PAID BY TOYOTA. SPECIALOFFER INCLUDES $500 TOYOTA FINANCE SAVINGS, WHICH IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. 2011 CAMRY LE MODEL 2532, MSRP $23,085. COROLLA DUE ATSIGNING INCLUDES $1820 DOWN, FIRST $179 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. COROLLA LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 1838, MSRP $18,060. HIGHLANDER DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1630 DOWN, FIRST $369 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT.HIGHLANDER MODEL 6948 MSRP $33,070. RAV4 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1790 DOWN, FIRST $209 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2010 RAV4 AUTOMATIC MODEL 4432 MSRP $24,385. SIENNA DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1700 DOWN, FIRST $299PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. SIENNA LE FRONT WHEEL DRIVE MODEL 5338, MSRP $30,230. CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGESOF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF36,000 MILES.YOUR PAYMENT MAY VARY BASED ON FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE.
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OFFERS END 5/2/11.
NEW 2011
CAMRY 
$
239
 /MO FOR
 
36
MOS
$
0
TAX, TAGS AND INSURANCE ARE EXTRA.
LEASE A NEW 2011
CAMRY LE
DOWN PAYMENTSECURITY DEPOSITFIRST MO PAYMENTDUE AT SIGNING
LEASE A NEW 2011
HIGHLANDER
$
369
 /MO
 
36
 
MOS
 
$
1999
DUE ATSIGNING
LEASE A NEW 2011
SIENNA LE
NEW 2011
TUNDRA 
$
2750
UP TO
0
%
 
 APRFINANCING
FOR
5
YEARS*
$
500
TOYOTAFINANCE CASH
**
 
(EXCLUDES HYBRIDS)
$
299
 /MO
 
36
 
MOS
 
$
1999
DUE ATSIGNING
1.9
%
 
 APRFINANCING
FOR
5
YEARS*
2.9
%
 
 APRFINANCING
FOR
5
YEARS*
2.9
%
 
 APRFINANCING
FOR
5
YEARS*
0
%
 
 APRFINANCING
FOR
5
YEARS*
LEASE A NEW 2011
RAV4
$
209
 /MO
 
36
 
MOS
 
$
1999
DUE ATSIGNING
APRFINANCING
FOR
5
YEARS*
2.9
%
 
LEASE A NEW 2011
COROLLA 
$
179
 /MO
 
36
 
MOS
 
$
1999
DUE ATSIGNING
CASH BACKFROM TOYOTA
††
TAX, TAGS AND INSURANCE ARE EXTRA.TAX, TAGS AND INSURANCE ARE EXTRA.TAX, TAGS AND INSURANCE ARE EXTRA.TAX, TAGS AND INSURANCE ARE EXTRA.
PLUSOR
OROROROR
Buyatoyota.com
OR
AFRO National Briefs
 
By Valencia Mohammed
Special to the AFRO
High rates of unemployment amongminorities, foreclosures, the rising cost of rent,utilities and fuel and extreme budget cuts arebehind a rise in the area’s homeless population,local homeless advocates say. An upcomingreport by the Washington Metropolitan Councilof Governments indicates the Washingtonregion’s homeless has increased to 11,988persons, mostly among families and AfricanAmericans, and that’s largely due to thehobbled economy.Jewel Stroman, 22, stands outside atemporary housing facility in Northwest D.C.with her daughter, hoping one day for a place tocall her own. Hamilton Jones, 47, a researcher,writer and former substance abuser has beendiagnosed with bipolar disorder. Jones surviveson a meager income of $20 a week and $200 inmonthly food stamps.“There’s an issue when people like me can’tget any benets because we’re judged to befunctional when we really aren’t. I mean, I havea felony record and history of mental illness.I can’t do much more than live in the streets,”said Jones.The count, which was conducted in the lastweek of January 2011 by area governmentsand homeless service providers, found that the number of homeless single adults, like Jones, decreased by less than 2percent, while the number of homeless persons in families,like Stroham, increased by 6 percent.Data from the count found that children represent 27percent of the region’s homeless population and 61 percent of all people in families that are homeless. It also showed that38 percent of all homeless adults in families and 20 percent of homeless single individuals are employed.Michael Ferrell, executive director of the D.C. Coalitionfor the Homeless, said unfortunately, Blacks represent 90percent of the homeless population in the District due to theeconomy and a depletion of federal funds for prevention andrapid re-housing programs.In a departure, more and more working, middle-classresidents are being counted among the homeless.Claybourne Couts, 47, an information technologyspecialist, bounces around different shelters and rooms whilehe tries to put his professional life in order. “Every time, Ithink I’ve found the perfect temporary setting, something goesawry. Many individuals who need someone to help them outwith their rent, take advantage of homelesspeople with income [who] lack stablehousing,” said Couts.Housing activist, Darlene Dancy saidD.C.’s rent control formula should berecongured. “It raised rents during aneconomic upswing. Now we are in a recessionand that formula does not coincide with realityalong with the fact that the ceiling cap hasbeen removed. It was the beginning of the endfor many people who are now homeless,” saidDancy, who lived out of her car for one yearbefore securing permanent housing.In 2010, during former D.C. MayorAdrian Fenty’s administration, a PermanentSupportive Housing Program (PSHP) wasdeveloped and implemented to providepermanent housing and supportive services tohundreds of chronically homeless individualsand families. However, due to depletedcity coffers, Mayor Vincent Gray cut deepinto programs for the underserved, leavingcommunity-based organizations withoutstafng or funding to provide wraparoundservices.“Budget cuts on programs for the poorwill weaken our ability provide the type of intensive care that is needed especially forthe homeless with mental health issues,”said Russell Snyder, president and CEOof Volunteers of American Chesapeake. “It makes it muchdifcult to provide the type of intensive care that is needed. Cardozo Heights Association for Neighborhood Growth andEnrichment (CHANGE), a well-known emergency assistanceprogram, has been operating for 44 years. Its director, GracieRolling, said the government should invest in jobs.“It’s one thing to participate in training programs with astipend. When there are no jobs available after you nish, thatwill keep someone homeless. The government must invest in jobs for Americans,” Rolling said.
April 30, 2011 - May 6, 2011, The Afro-American
A3
 
  
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 Baltimore Afro-American
(USPS 040-800)is published weekly by The
 Afro-American Newspapers
,2519 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-4602.
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 Afro-American Newspaper Company,
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Send addresses changes to
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 Afro-American Newspapers at 1917 Benning Road, N.E., Washington, D.C.20002-4723.
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Continued from A1
Redistricting
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Economy Drives Increase in Homeless Count
 AP Photo/The Washington Post, Marvin Joseph
Gwendolyn Bell holds her cellular telephone during an interview inside the BNP SoupKitchen in Capitol Hill in Washington on March 20, 2009. Services that provide resourcesto the homeless, such as free cell phones, have been impacted by a growing homelesspopulation and decreased funds.
boundaries into Ward 6 willgive us greater economic andracial diversity. That is whatI’m aiming for.”Members told witnessesthat university students andD.C. jail inmates were part of the count. But some expressedconcerns that certain wardswere over-counted andundercounted. “AfricanAmericans and Latinoshave traditionally beenundercounted,” Barry said.The Hispanic population hasgrown by nearly 22 percent,and even though the African-American population remainsthe largest, there was a 9.3decrease in population.Joy Phillips, the associatedirector of the State DataCenter, said there were hard-to-count (HTC) citizens,which include those whowere unemployed, homelessor impoverished, who wereuncounted. Barry argued thata majority of his residentswere HTC and less than 100percent of residents weresurveyed, which makes thecount disproportionate.“We did everythingpossible,” Councilman Brownsaid. Brown added that thecommittee, in conjunctionwith the Census Bureau,traveled to grocery stores,metro stops and knocked ondoors to get D.C. residents toll out census forms.Phillips said the CensusBureau expected a “dropin participation” amongD.C. residents. However,the Census saw an inux of participation in D.C. –72percent participation in 2010compared to 69 percent in2000.The subcommittee isexpected to submit a report tothe full Council by June. Andthe city is expected to have afull-scale redistricting plan bythe end of the year.
AT OVER $11 MILLION, IT’S THE LARGESTPRIZE POOL IN DC LOTTERY HISTORY
 
“African Americansand Latinos havetraditionally beenundercounted...” 

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