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Vol. 41, Issue 2

Vol. 41, Issue 2

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Published by The Rutgers Review
Featuring: NJ United Students, Nocturnal Conspiracies, Bathroom graffiti, RutgersFest, Jeff the Brotherhood, and Chiodos
Featuring: NJ United Students, Nocturnal Conspiracies, Bathroom graffiti, RutgersFest, Jeff the Brotherhood, and Chiodos

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Published by: The Rutgers Review on Apr 29, 2011
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March | April 2011
 
Volume 41 Issue 2
RUTGERS REVIEW
       T       H       E
RUTGERS UNITED AGAINST TUITION HIKESSURVIVAL GUIDE: RUTGERSFESTROCKING A PRINCETON EATING CLUBTO BFA OR NOT TO BFA?
 
2
 
THE RUTGERS REVIEW
March | April 2011March | April 2011
THE RUTGERS REVIEW
3
table of contentsletter from the editor
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Rob Gulya
CULTURE EDITOR 
Edward Reep
A&E EDITOR 
Melissa Gabilanes
POTPOURRI EDITOR 
Lizzie Plaugic
MUSIC EDITOR 
 Joe Zorzi
VICE PRESIDENT
Zac Schaffner
TREASURER 
Ian Kotliar
ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR 
Samantha Kelly
COPYEDITOR 
Amanda Matteo
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Dan De Poto,
 
Emma Rackmil
CONTRIBUTERS
 Jess Cain,
 
Mimi Gabriel, SoniaKaras, Matthew Kosinski, Michael Schwab, LeeSeltzer, Andrew Smith, Marcin Wysocki
ADVISOR 
Ronald Miskoff 
Dear Faithful Reader, As April winds and showers inspire nature with their sweet breathe, and as New Bruns-wick thaws from its difficult winter, The Rutgers Review emerges, like the flowers: new,fresh, colorful. At The Rutgers Review, we’ve done some soul searching. As a group, we’vetried to find our voice, no longer content to be the “alternative magazine” that we’ve beenin years past. Instead, we sought to offer something new and exciting. Creating this iden-tity has been our big project, and this issue encapsulates what we’ve become: the voice of astudent.From a discussion of BFAs and MFAs, to a defense for Facebook, to a nostaligic look atthe New Brunswick basement show scene (or lack there of...) the articles in this issue attemptto capture what its really like to be a student at Rutgers, straddling the middle ground be-tween seriousness and humor.Please, come join us in this celebration of college life, after all, you only get one shot atit. I invite you to send us feedback. Shoot us and email. Write us a letter. Message us onFacebook. Comment on our Tumblr. Or just come to a meeting and say hi.Sincerely,Rob GulyaEditor-in-Chief 
456810111214182022242627293031
Amanda Matteo
Facebook, Like It
Lee Seltzer 
RUSA 101
Melissa Gabilanes
DCC Does Damage
Mimi Gabriel & Melissa Gabilanes
Stories from the Studio
Eric Weinstein
A Field Analysis of Unauthorized Artwork in PublicLavatories
Edward Reep
Television Junk Woes
 Jess Cain
Nocturnal Conspiracies
Rob Gulya
New Jersey Students Unite Against the Budget
Lizzie Plaugic
 JEFF the Whateverhood
Sonia Karas
Reborn: An Interview with Chiodos
Marcin Wysocki
What’s Become of the Local New Brunswick Scene
Matthew Kosinski
How to Love a Bartender
Amanda Matteo
How to Make it Look Like You Can Bake
Rutgers Review Staff 
Rutgersfest Survival Guide
Curious Cat
Ode to Second Base
Andrew Smith
A Most Wonderful Stoning
Michael Schwab
Paul+Robeson
14 818 26 
ART DIRECTOR & PRESIDENT
Sharanya Durvasula & Eric Weinstein
SUBMISSIONS, QUESTIONS,COMMENTS, QUERIES:
therutgersreview@gmail.com
 
CULTURE
4
 
THE RUTGERS REVIEW
March | April 2011
CULTURE
our witty status just got ten “likes” in fif-teen minutes. Your new profile picture gotfive flattering comments in thirty. And si-multaneously, as more and more notification signalspop up on the side of your screen, your sense of self-confidence and self-worth increases along with thenumber. It seems pathetic that anyone could rely somuch on a social networking site for positive reinforce-ment, but in a generation run by Facebook, you can’treally expect anything less. But rather than launchinto some long-winded rant about how Facebook isdestroying our minds and poisoning our friendships,I’m going to instead take this time to praise the sitefor actually preparing us for the real world. Too manypeople waste their time complaining about how tech-nologically-dependent we are, especially concerning social networking. It’s time to just accept it and ap-preciate its benefits for all they are worth.Life is always a popularity contest. Whether youlike it or not, you are always being judged and ana-lyzed, and the impressions people have of you truly domatter. Of course, it’s most important to be yourself and to act based on what you think is best; however,I think it is safe to say that never caring about whatothers think is an impossible, and senseless, feat. Toget what you want out of life, it is necessary to put yourself out there and, as displeasing as it may sound, you need to please people along the way.Now I am not in any way saying that a status withobscure song lyrics is as important as, say, a job inter- view, but I do believe that our Facebook-focused men-tality can apply to both situations. We focus on “likes”and comments and wall posts, or, more generally, asense of acceptance and appreciation for what we doand say. I will openly admit to changing statuses mul-tiple times in a row in an attempt to please the mostfriends and, in return, get the satisfaction of that littlered blinking notification. At face value, that seemsshallow and ridiculous (and maybe it is), but if appliedto a broader context, maybe our preoccupation withfeeling “popular” isn’t such a bad thing. If you go outinto the world with the understanding that sometimes you need to suck it up and tell people what they wantto hear in order to get what you want out of life, thenthat oh-so-important job interview is going to be athousand times more successful. Or, sticking with themetaphor, those fifty-two satisfying notifications aregoing to flood your newsfeed instantly.Coming from a self-proclaimed Facebook addict,this may seem like a biased justification of why myprocrastination method really isn’t so bad (I swear, itisn’t, I promise!). But in actuality, I think it’s abouttime that we all just get with the program. We are ageneration run by technology, and rather than runfrom it, we should appreciate and grow from the les-sons it can teach us. Facebook is not just a social net-working site; it is a fundamental part of our everydaylives. So keep updating those statuses and posing forthat perfect profile picture, because, day by day, it’spreparing you for the real world. Kudos to you, Mark Zuckerberg. If I get that new job, you’ll be the firstperson I thank.
ou benefit from it. You might vote for it.You may even know people on it, but do you understand it? Student governmentat Rutgers— it’s amazing that this university pridesitself on getting its students to “get involved,” yet veryfew people even know what student government does.Hell, I’m on my dorm’s hall government, and most of what Rutgers student government does remained amystery to me before writing this article. That is whyI decided to review the constitution of the RutgersUniversity Student Assembly (RUSA) to learn whatit’s all about.The most obvious question, of course, is whatdoes RUSA do? According to the first section of theconstitution, the purpose of RUSA is to serve as theliaison to local and state government. Essentially, if concerned parties at the university have any issuesthat need to be presented to the government, they gothrough RUSA.So now we know what RUSA does, but how doesit work? Well, it works very similarly to how theUS government does. This is of course through themaking and executing of laws. The making is done, very appropriately, by a legislative branch, made upof Senators and representatives from various interestgroups at Rutgers. The executing is done by an exec-utive board, made up of a President, Vice President,Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary and Recording Secretary.RUSA is also made up of a number of committees.The most important ones are called the core commit-tees, as these were the ones initially created by theRUSA constitution.These consist of the committees of  Academic Affairs,Legislative Affairs,University Affairs and Public Relations. The consti-tution also leaves room for the creation of other com-mittees as well. What many people probably do not realize is that, just like with our own federal government, there isroom to impeach those serving in RUSA. This isdone through an investigation by the Internal Af-fairs committee, and, if it approves, a hearing is held.During the hearing, the impeached member has theopportunity to make his case, with a two-thirds ma- jority needed to remove him from office.RUSA is also made up of its Allocations Board,which, to many students, is the most important part.This is because the Allocations Board is the groupthat decides which student organizations get moneyand how much money they get. So that medievalweaponry club and Yankee’s Stadium fan club youlove so much wouldn’t be around if it weren’t forRUSA allocations. As you can see, RUSA is a pretty cool organiza-tion that has a great effect on all Rutgers students,even if its constitution is full of a lot of big words andlegal jargon. My only suggestion: make it easier forstudents to learn about and understand it becauseonly so many people are actually going to waste theirfree time reading RUSA’s constitution like I did!
Facebook, Like It.
by Amanda Matteo
by Lee Seltzer
RUSA
 JUST LIKE WITH OUR OWNFEDERAL GOVERNMENT,THERE IS ROOM TO IMPEACHTHOSE SERVING IN RUSA.

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