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Table Of Contents

1.2 From observationsto lawsand theories
1.3 The role ofexperiments
1.5 On principles, methodsand tools
1.6 Search for theories
2.1 Definitionsand importance
2.2 General observations
2.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
2.3.1 Glass’ law
2.3.3 Boehm’ssecond law
2.3.4 Davis’ law
2.4 More on requirementsdefinition
2.4.1 Vision statement
2.4.2 Requirementselicitation and prioritization
2.4.3 Knowledge acquisition and management
2.4.5 Functionaland non-functionalrequirements
2.4.7 Detailed documentation ofrequirements
2.4.8 Buy-in, validation and approvalofrequirements
2.4.9 Requirementstracing and change control
2.5.1 Textformatting requirements
2.5.2 Digital library requirements
Exercises
3.1 Definitionsand importance
3.2 General observations
3.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
3.3.1 Curtis’ law
3.3.4 Parnas’ law
3.3.6 Fitts–Shneiderman law
3.3.7 Booch’ssecond hypothesis
3.3.8 Bauer–Zemanekhypothesis
3.3.9 Gamma’shypothesis
3.4 More on system design and specification
3.4.1 Projectgoalsand design criteria
3.4.2 Open architectures
3.4.3 Design qualityand iterative design
3.4.4 Design ofdata structuresand databases
3.4.5 Design for safetyand security
3.4.6 Technologyimpacton system design
3.4.7 Documentation ofdesign
3.4.8 CASEtoolsand design change control
3.4.9 Cognitive processesand group dynamics
3.4.10 User participation and growing ofdesigners
3.5.1 Textformatting design
3.5.2 Digital library design
3.5.3 Performance analysis
3.5.4 Metrics analysis
4.1 Definitionsand importance
4.2 General observations
4.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
4.3.3 Dijkstra–Mills–Wirth law
4.3.7 Dahl–Goldberg hypothesis
4.3.8 Beck–Fowler hypothesis
4.3.9 Basili–Boehm COTShypothesis
4.4 More on system construction and composition
4.4.1 Incrementaldevelopmentand integration
4.4.2 Implementation languages
4.4.3 Application generators
4.4.4 Visualprogramming languages
4.4.5 Programming byexample
4.4.6 Software metrics
4.4.7 Configuration management and version control
4.4.8 Software factories
4.4.9 Legacy applications
4.5.1 Textformatting implementation
4.5.2 Program size variations
4.5.3 Metricsapplication
5.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
5.3.2 Porter–Votta law
5.3.5 Mills–Joneshypothesis
5.3.7 Hoare’shypothesis
5.4 More on validation and staticverification
5.4.2 Staticsoftware visualization
5.5.1 Formalspecification
5.5.2 Design inspection
5.5.3 Code inspection
6.1 Definitionsand importance
6.2 General observations
6.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
6.3.4 Pareto–Zipf-type laws
6.3.5 Gray–Serlin law
6.3.6 Nielsen–Norman law
6.3.7 Gutjahr’shypothesis
6.3.8 Weyuker’shypothesis
6.3.9 Endres–Glatthaar hypothesis
6.3.10 Hamlet’shypothesis
6.4 More on testing
6.4.2 Testplanning and testcase development
6.4.4 Clean-room and other testing strategies
6.4.5 Testing ofobject-oriented or real-time software
6.4.6 Use ofassertionsand code-embedded testaids
6.4.7 Dynamicsoftware visualization
6.4.8 Operational profile
6.5 Examples and study material
6.5.1 Text formatting unit test
7.1 Definitionsand importance
7.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
7.3.1 Conjecture 1
7.3.2 Conjecture 2
7.3.3 Conjecture 3
7.3.4 Conjecture 4
7.4 More on system manufacturing, distribution, and installation
7.4.1 Software distribution methodsand tools
7.4.2 Software installation methodsand tools
7.4.3 User training and help services
7.4.4 Customizing, localizing, and conversion
7.5.1 Manufacturing and distribution
8.1 Definitionsand importance
8.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
8.3.2 Lehman’ssecond law
8.3.3 Lehman’sthird law
8.3.4 Basili–Möller law
8.3.5 McCabe’shypothesis
8.3.6 Wilde’shypothesis
8.3.7 Conjecture 5
8.3.8 Conjecture 6
8.4 More on system administration, evolution, and maintenance
8.4.2 Vendor strategiesfor service and maintenance
8.4.3 User strategiesfor service and maintenance
8.5.2 Maintenance strategy
9.1 Definitions and importance
9.2 General observations
9.3.1 Sackman’s second law
9.3.6 Brooks’ law
9.3.8 Boehm’shypothesis
9.4 More on projectmanagementand businessanalysis
9.4.3 People assignmentand skillmanagement
9.4.5 Software pricing and businesscase
9.4.6 Productpackaging and licensing
9.4.7 Intellectualpropertyrights
9.4.8 The open source model
9.5 Examples and studymaterial
9.5.1 Cost estimating (bottom-up approach)
9.5.2 Cost estimating (with COCOMO-II)
9.5.3 Business analysis
9.5.4 Project tracking
10.1 Definitionsand importance
10.2 General observations
10.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
10.3.1 Kupfmüller’slaw
10.3.2 Gestalt laws
10.3.3Miller’slaw
10.3.7 Maslow–Herzberg law
10.3.8 McGregor’shypothesis
10.3.9 Hawthorne effect
10.3.10 Marketer’shypothesis
10.4 More on user skills, motivation, and satisfaction
10.4.1 Conducting user studies
10.4.2 Specialabilitiesand attitudes
10.4.3 Customer feedbackand satisfaction
10.4.4 Social opportunities and risks
10.5.1 Professionaldevelopmentand career planning
10.5.2 Customer satisfaction survey
11.1 Definitionsand importance
11.2 General observations
11.3 Applicable lawsand their theories
11.3.4 Morris–Ferguson law
11.3.6 Shaw–Garlan hypothesis
11.3.7 Bayer’shypothesis
11.3.8 Codd’shypothesis
11.3.9 Engelbart’shypothesis
11.4 More on technology, architecture, and industrycapabilities
11.4.1 Technologyassessmentand prediction
11.4.2 Management of technology and innovation
11.4.3 Some emerging technologiesand applications
11.4.4 Assessing industrycapabilities
11.4.5 Developing an information systemsstrategy
11.5.1 Information systemsstrategy
12.3.4 Conjecture 8
12.3.5 Conjecture 9
12.3.6 Conjecture 10
12.3.7 Conjecture 11
12.3.8 Conjecture 12
12.4 More on measurements, experiments, and empirical research
12.4.1 Defining experimentalgoals
12.4.2 Deriving testable hypotheses
12.4.3 Designing experiments
12.4.4 Analysisand validation ofresults
12.4.5 Replication ofexperiments
12.5.1 Comparative productevaluation
12.5.2 Evaluation of verification methods (hypothesis-based)
13.1 More on the lawsand theoriescovered in the book
13.3 Research issues
13.4 Implicationsfor education and practice
13.5 Future ofsoftware and systemsengineering
13.6 Beyond observations, laws, and theories
References
Index
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A Handbook of Software and Systems Engineering

A Handbook of Software and Systems Engineering

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Published by: das_hs on May 05, 2011
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