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Charlotte Perkins Gilman - Herland

Charlotte Perkins Gilman - Herland

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Published by hawkair
Herland is a utopian novel from 1915, written by feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The book describes an isolated society composed entirely of women who reproduce via parthenogenesis (asexual reproduction). The result is an ideal social order, free of war, conflict and domination.
Herland is a utopian novel from 1915, written by feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The book describes an isolated society composed entirely of women who reproduce via parthenogenesis (asexual reproduction). The result is an ideal social order, free of war, conflict and domination.

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Published by: hawkair on May 07, 2011
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05/25/2012

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Herland
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins
Published:
1915
Categorie(s):
Fiction, Humorous, Political, Erotica
Source:
http://www.gutenberg.org
1
 
About Gilman:
Charlotte Perkins Gilman (July 3, 1860 – August 17, 1935) was a prom-inent American sociologist, novelist, writer of short stories, poetry, andnon fiction, and a lecturer for social reform. She was a utopian feministduring a time when her accomplishments were exceptional for women,and she served as a role model for future generations of feminists be-cause of her unorthodox concepts and lifestyle. Her best rememberedwork today is her semi-autobiographical short story, "The Yellow Wall-paper", which she wrote after a severe bout of post-partum depression.
Also available on Feedbooks for Gilman:
(1892)
(1911)
(1910)
Copyright:
This work is available for countries where copyright isLife+70and in the USA.
Note:
This book is brought to you by Feedbookshttp://www.feedbooks.comStrictly for personal use, do not use this file for commercial purposes.
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Chapter
1
A Not Unnatural Enterprise
This is written from memory, unfortunately. If I could have brought withme the material I so carefully prepared, this would be a very differentstory. Whole books full of notes, carefully copied records, firsthand de-scriptions, and the pictures—that's the worst loss. We had some bird's-eyes of the cities and parks; a lot of lovely views of streets, of buildings,outside and in, and some of those gorgeous gardens, and, most import-ant of all, of the women themselves.Nobody will ever believe how they looked. Descriptions aren't anygood when it comes to women, and I never was good at descriptionsanyhow. But it's got to be done somehow; the rest of the world needs toknow about that country.I haven't said where it was for fear some self-appointed missionaries,or traders, or land-greedy expansionists, will take it upon themselves topush in. They will not be wanted, I can tell them that, and will fare worsethan we did if they do find it.It began this way. There were three of us, classmates andfriends—Terry O. Nicholson (we used to call him the Old Nick, withgood reason), Jeff Margrave, and I, Vandyck Jennings.We had known each other years and years, and in spite of our differ-ences we had a good deal in common. All of us were interested inscience.Terry was rich enough to do as he pleased. His great aim was explora-tion. He used to make all kinds of a row because there was nothing leftto explore now, only patchwork and filling in, he said. He filled in wellenough—he had a lot of talents—great on mechanics and electricity. Hadall kinds of boats and motorcars, and was one of the best of our airmen.We never could have done the thing at all without Terry. Jeff Margrave was born to be a poet, a botanist—or both—but his folkspersuaded him to be a doctor instead. He was a good one, for his age, but his real interest was in what he loved to call "the wonders of science."
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