Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
7Activity

Table Of Contents

3. Making decisions
4. Addiction as vulnerabilities in decision-making
5. Drugs and the taxonomy of vulnerabilities
6. Future work is still needed
R1. Introduction: The parameter space of addiction
R2. Clarifications
R3. A framework for understanding the machinery of decision-making
R4. A taxonomy of addiction
R5. Predictions and falsifiability
R6. Additional vulnerabilities
R7. Treatment and assessment
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
A unified framework for addiction: Vulnerabilities in the decision process

A unified framework for addiction: Vulnerabilities in the decision process

Ratings:

4.71

(7)
|Views: 8,244|Likes:
Published by AbnerRavenwood
A. David Redish, Steve Jensen and Adam Johnson

Behavioral and Brain Sciences , Volume 31, Issue 04, August 2008, pp 415-437

The understanding of decision-making systems has come together in recent years to form a unified theory of decision-making in the mammalian brain as arising from multiple, interacting systems (a planning system, a habit system, and a situation-recognition system). This unified decision-making system has multiple potential access points through which it can be driven to make maladaptive choices, particularly choices that entail seeking of certain drugs or behaviors. We identify 10 key vulnerabilities in the system: (1) moving away from homeostasis, (2) changing allostatic set points, (3) euphorigenic “reward-like” signals, (4) overvaluation in the planning system, (5) incorrect search of situation-action-outcome relationships, (6) misclassification of situations, (7) overvaluation in the habit system, (8) a mismatch in the balance of the two decision systems, (9) over-fast discounting processes, and (10) changed learning rates. These vulnerabilities provide a taxonomy of potential problems with decision-making systems. Although each vulnerability can drive an agent to return to the addictive choice, each vulnerability also implies a characteristic symptomology. Different drugs, different behaviors, and different individuals are likely to access different vulnerabilities. This has implications for an individual's susceptibility to addiction and the transition to addiction, for the potential for relapse, and for the potential for treatment.
A. David Redish, Steve Jensen and Adam Johnson

Behavioral and Brain Sciences , Volume 31, Issue 04, August 2008, pp 415-437

The understanding of decision-making systems has come together in recent years to form a unified theory of decision-making in the mammalian brain as arising from multiple, interacting systems (a planning system, a habit system, and a situation-recognition system). This unified decision-making system has multiple potential access points through which it can be driven to make maladaptive choices, particularly choices that entail seeking of certain drugs or behaviors. We identify 10 key vulnerabilities in the system: (1) moving away from homeostasis, (2) changing allostatic set points, (3) euphorigenic “reward-like” signals, (4) overvaluation in the planning system, (5) incorrect search of situation-action-outcome relationships, (6) misclassification of situations, (7) overvaluation in the habit system, (8) a mismatch in the balance of the two decision systems, (9) over-fast discounting processes, and (10) changed learning rates. These vulnerabilities provide a taxonomy of potential problems with decision-making systems. Although each vulnerability can drive an agent to return to the addictive choice, each vulnerability also implies a characteristic symptomology. Different drugs, different behaviors, and different individuals are likely to access different vulnerabilities. This has implications for an individual's susceptibility to addiction and the transition to addiction, for the potential for relapse, and for the potential for treatment.

More info:

Published by: AbnerRavenwood on Sep 05, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/15/2011

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 4 to 25 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 29 to 73 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (7)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
qayxswedcvfr liked this
zubox1 liked this
JimHilborn liked this
mihai corciova liked this
Luke Bosdet liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->