Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
People for Education School Libraries and Information Literacy

People for Education School Libraries and Information Literacy

Ratings: (0)|Views: 24|Likes:
Published by Sarah Boesveld
People for Education School Library Report
People for Education School Library Report

More info:

Published by: Sarah Boesveld on May 16, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/16/2011

pdf

text

original

 
PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION MAY 2011
© People for Education 2011 Annual School Survey
SCHOOL LIBRARIES ANDINFORMATION LITERACY 
School libraries are a doorway for children and youth to learn about the world. By design,they are sites for students to explore and develop
their own
interests, and to foster a love of reading,
1
along with their inquiry and research skills. And as the digital world puts more andmore information at students’ finger tips, the library can open the door to learning beyondthe walls of the school.
CONTINUED DECLINE IN TEACHER-LIBRARIAN NUMBERS
In Ontario, there appears to be decliningsupport for the distinct role of schoollibraries. This year, only 56% of elementaryschools have a teacher-librarian (eightypercent of them work part-time), a numberthat has fallen steadily from 80% in1997/98. In high schools, where students domore independent work, the number ishigher – 66% – but is down from the 78% of ten years ago.Students in smaller communities and insmaller schools are much less likely toattend schools that have teacher-librarians.Only 19% of elementary schools in EasternOntario and 10% of elementary schools inNorthern Ontario have teacher-librarians,compared to 92% of elementary schools inthe GTA. Some principals from theseregions say that their schools don’t have alibrary at all.The loss of teacher-librarians also affects thenumber of hours school libraries are openeach week. Libraries in schools withteacher-librarians are more likely to havelonger hours, which ensures that studentshave access to them before, during and afterthe school day.
2
 
THE ROLE OF THE LIBRARY INBUILDING “21
ST
CENTURY SKILLS”
There is a widespread movement – inpolitics, business and education – to shift theemphasis in education from theindustrial/manufacturing skills needed in the20
th
century, to the so-called “knowledge”skills or competencies needed for success in
QUICK FACTS FOR 2010/11
 
56% of elementary schools have a teacher-librarian, most are part-time; this is adecline from 80% in 1997/98.
 
66% of secondary schools have a teacher-librarian, just over half are full-time; this isa decline from 78% in 2000/01.
 
57% of secondary schools and 40% of elementary schools have a policy on socialnetworking.
Teacher-Librarians in Ontario Elementary andSecondary Schools, Both Full- or Part-time
50%60%70%80%90%
  1  9  9  8  /  9  9  2  0  0  0  /  0  1  2  0  0  2  /  0  3  2  0  0  4  /  0  5  2  0  0  6  /  0   7  2  0  0  8  /  0  9  2  0  1  0  /  1  1
Elementary SchoolSecondary School
 
PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION MAY 2011
© People for Education 2011 Annual School Survey
the 21
st
century.
3
There are varyingdefinitions of these so-called “21
st
centuryskills.” Some suggest adding the 4C’s of communication, collaboration, criticalthinking and creativity to the 3Rs;
4
othersfocus more on technological skills. But thecommon core element of this newmovement is a focus on developingstudents’ capacity to find, evaluate, organizeand transform all the information nowavailable in the staggeringly large, unfilteredand collaborative digital universe. Theseskills fall under the term “informationliteracy.”There are references to information literacythroughout the Ontario curriculum, andmany curriculum documents link information literacy to the library, but thereappears to be a gap between the provincialpolicy-level commitment to “21
st
centurylearning”
5
and what the provincecommunicates to Ontario principals andteachers.That gap is evident in the responses to a newquestion on this year’s surveys. When askedif their school had an information literacystrategy or plan, elementary schoolprincipals were almost six times as likely todescribe plans for improving test scores inreading and writing as they were to report onstrategies to improve students’ skills inresearch or the use of informationtechnology. High school principals werethree times as likely to reply withdescriptions of strategies to improve Grade10 literacy test results.
6
 But some schools did provide responsesrelated to research and informationtechnology. And in those schools, half listedthe teacher librarian as having a key role
inthe implementation of their strategies
.
SCHOOL LIBRARIES IMPROVE TESTSCORES
In 2005, People for Education and Queen’sUniversity conducted a joint study on schoollibraries and their relationship to studentachievement. Data from Grade 3 and 6EQAO Literacy tests were correlated on aschool-by-school basis to examine whether alink existed between higher studentachievement and school library conditions.Results from the data analysis showed that:
 
the presence of trained library staff is associated with a higherproportion of grade 6 studentsattaining level 3 (the provincialstandard) on reading tests;
 
schools without professional librarystaffing tend to have lowerachievement on the grade 3 readingtests (both in terms of averageachievement and attaining level 3);and
 
the presence of teacher-librarians isassociated with more positiveattitudes towards reading in bothgrade 3 and grade 6 students.
Elementary school libraries across the provinceElementary school libraries across the provinceElementary school libraries across the provinceElementary school libraries across the provincePercentage with teacher-librarians, either full or part-timePercentage with teacher-librarians, either full or part-timePercentage with teacher-librarians, either full or part-timePercentage with teacher-librarians, either full or part-time
56%19%91%92%53%10%
0%20%40%60%80%100%
  O  n  t  a  r   i  o   E  a  s  t  e  r  n  C  e  n  t  r  a   l  G   T  A  S  o  u  t   h  w  e  s  t  e  r  n   N  o  r  t   h  e  r  n
 
PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION MAY 2011
© People for Education 2011 Annual School Survey
BUILDING A LEARNING COMMONS
While most teachers see technology in theclassroom as beneficial, the majority remainunable to find feasible ways to make full useof it.
7
Information literacy needs a base inschools where teachers and students canboth develop these competencies. TheOntario School Library Association (OSLA)recommends developing school libraries as“learning commons” to provide that base.In 2009, the Ministryof Education fundedthe OSLA to write
Together for Learning
,which provides a blueprint for thedevelopment of a “learning commons” inevery school. These hubs would be based inschool libraries and provide centres forinformation literacy, technology andcollaborative learning. Although theMinistry funded the document, it has notreleased it as a curriculum support.
WHAT PRINCIPALS TOLD US . . .
We no longer have a library. The bookroom is usedby teachers.
Elementary School, DSB Ontario North East
Teachers look after themselves in the library – wehave a 0.1 teacher available to support studentresearch and learning.
Elementary School, Bluewater DSB
We only have in-class libraries in our school, and wego to the local public library twice a month.
Elementary School, Sudbury CDSB
Our committee is trying to raise $36,000 in order topurchase more laptops for the school. We find weare very limited in this technology and thereforehave to find ways to provide it for our students. Wefeel that Information Literacy is important, butwithout the technology, we struggle to movetowards greater use by staff with their students.
Elementary School, Simcoe Muskoka CDSB
RECOMMENDATIONS
All students and teachers should have the capacity to find, evaluate, organize andtransform information in the digital universe.People for Education recommends
 
that the province support a leadership role for teacher-librarians, who can workwith classroom teachers to develop feasible information literacy programs for allstudents and
 
that the province ensure that all teachers receive appropriate information andtechnology education in faculties of education and through ongoing professionaldevelopment.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->