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Titanic Science

Titanic Science

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Published by jerrtino
http://www.titanicscience.com
Teacher's guide: explore the story of Titantic from the scientific point of view, hands-on investigations for students. All activities are coded to the National Science Standards and National Social Studies Standards
http://www.titanicscience.com
Teacher's guide: explore the story of Titantic from the scientific point of view, hands-on investigations for students. All activities are coded to the National Science Standards and National Social Studies Standards

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Published by: jerrtino on May 17, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/20/2012

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ACTIVITy GuIde |TITANIC scIence
2
TITANIC SCIENCE
NationalEducationalStandards
   S   C   I   E   N   C   E   S  c   i  e  n  c  e  a  s   I  n  q  u   i  r  y   P   h  y  s   i  c  a   l   S  c   i  e  n  c  e   E  a  r  t   h  a  n   d   S  p  a  c  e   S  c   i  e  n  c  e   L   i   f  e   S  c   i  e  n  c  e   S  c   i  e  n  c  e  a  n   d   T  e  c   h  n  o   l  o  g  y   S  c   i  e  n  c  e   i  n   P  e  r  s  o  n  a   l  a  n   d   S  o  c   i  a   l   P  e  r  s  p  e  c  t   i  v  e  s   H   i  s  t  o  r  y  a  n   d   N  a  t  u  r  e  o   f   S  c   i  e  n  c  e   S   O   C   I   A   L   S   T   U   D   I   E   S   T   i  m  e ,   C  o  n  t   i  n  u   i  t  y  a  n   d   C   h  a  n  g  e   P  e  o  p   l  e ,   P   l  a  c  e  s  a  n   d   E  n  v   i  r  o  n  m  e  n  t  s
Activities 
The Great ShipSinkers and FloatersBuoyancyDisplacementDesign a ShipWatertight BulkheadsWhat Sank the Titanic?Making an IcebergPlotting Icebergs and LocationsCalculating Iceberg FrequencyWater PressureRivet FailureCreate Your Own PhotomosaicPhotomosaic of TitanicCommunicationWhat We Have Here is a Failureto CommunicateWireless RadioSurvivor StoriesSurvivors’ TestimoniesEstimating the AnglesTesting Eyewitness MemoryCould More Have Been Saved?The Fate of TitanicRust in the ClassroomRust on the TitanicArtifact Conservation
• •
 
Titanic Statistics
The largest movable man-madeobject ever made (at that time)Passenger capacity: 2,435Total crew: 885Total passengers and crew: 3,320Displacement/weight: 66,000tons of waterLength: 882.5 feetWidth: 93 feetHeight from bottom of ship(keel) to top of funnels: 175 feetDraught (depth to which a vesselis immersed): 34 feet 7 inchesCruising speed: 22.5 knots (milesper hour = knots multiplied by1.152)Combined weight of 3 anchors:31 tonsSize of propellers: The 2 outerpropellers had a diameter of 23feet. The center propeller had adiameter of 17 feet.Rudder: 78 feet high, weight 101tonsA total of 3 million rivets (1,200tons) held the ship’s steel hulltogetherEngines: two four-cylinder steamreciprocating engines and onelow-pressure turbine engine.Total horsepower was 46,000159 furnaces (stoked by hand)burned coal to operate 29 boilers
ACTIVITy GuIde |TITANIC scIence
3
PART ONE
The Great Ship
HISTORY ANDSHIPBUILDINGPRINCIPLES
Introduction to Titanic
Titanic 
and her sister ship
Olympic,
owned by the White Star Line, weredesigned to set new standards of luxuryfor trans-Atlantic travel. They weren’tintended to be the fastest, but they wereto be the largest, able to accommodatemore freight and pas-sengers than theirfaster competitors.They could guaranteea week’s crossing inspectacular condi-tions. The first classaccommodationsincluded elaborate suites decorated in avariety of styles. First-class passengerscould also enjoy a gymnasium, swim-ming pool, squash racket courts andTurkish bath. Second class accommoda-tions on
Titanic 
were better than firstclass on many other ships. Third classpassengers, most of them emigrants,would find the accommodations morecomfortable and the food more plentifulthan anything they had previouslyknown in their lives. Inaddition to carryingpassengers,
Titanic 
wasalso designed to carrycargo.The Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast,Ireland, handled actual construction.Harland and Wolff had built ships forthe White Star Line since 1870. The shipswere constructed on a cost-plus basis.Instead of providing a constructionbudget up front, the White Star Lineexecutives would tell Harland and Wolff 
Above: 
Photograph of
Titanic’s 
massive rud-der and propellers. Note the relative size ofthe man standing beneath them.

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