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Field Artillery Journal - Oct 1941

Field Artillery Journal - Oct 1941

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Published by CAP History Library
Army
Army

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: CAP History Library on May 18, 2011
Copyright:Public Domain

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12/25/2013

pdf

 
 
 
A New Handbook 
for the FIELD ARTILLERY!
DRILL AND CEREMONIESFOR FIELD ARTILLERY
 
(COMPLETE)
Check the Table of Contents and see for yourself thecompleteness of this new and handy training manual forthe Field Artilleryman. It is based upon and conforms tothe latest training doctrines of the Army. We believethis to be the only single text in which the importantsubject of Dismounted Drill for the Field Artillery maybe found in print today.
 
Nowhere else is all this information available underone cover. Every officer and soldier of Field Artilleryshould have a copy.
 
TABLE OF CONTENTSD
ISMOUNTED
D
RILL
 S
ERVICE OF THE
P
IECE
 Section 1. 75-mm Gun, M1897 (Horse-Drawn)and 77-mm Gun, 1897A4 (Truck-Drawn)Section 2. 155-mm Howitzer, M1918A1 (Truck-Drawn)P
ISTOL
 E
QUITATION
 T
HE
M
OTOR 
D
RIVER 
 D
RIVING AND
D
RAFT
 M
OUNTED
F
ORMATIONS AND
M
ANEUVERS
 Section 1. The Truck-Drawn BatterySection 2. The Horse-Drawn BatterySection 3. The Battalion, Regiment, andBrigade, Truck- and Horse-DrawnS
TANDARDS AND
G
UIDONS
 I
 NTERIOR 
G
UARD
D
UTY
 C
EREMONIES
 I
 NDIVIDUAL
E
QUIPMENT AND
T
ENT
P
ITCHING
 M
ILITARY
C
OURTESY
, C
USTOMS OF THE
S
ERVICE AND
D
ISCIPLINE
 
10-24 copies, 10% discount, postpaid.
 
Quantity orders:
 
25 or more copies, 20% discount, F.O.B. Harrisburg, Pa.
PRICE $1.00, POSTPAID
 
Order through
 
U. S. FIELD ARTILLERY ASSOCIATION
 
1624 H Street, N. W. Washington, D. C.
 
 
MAJOR W. S. NYE,
 Editor
 
LIEUT, HARVEY S. FORD,
 Assistant Editor
 
LENNA PEDIGO,
 Business Manager
 
FIELD ARTILLERYMEN should be particularly interested in the mapping and surveyexercises conducted at Fort Bragg. For years theField Artillery has been testing and teachingcertain methods and doctrines, but here for thefirst time was afforded an opportunity to try themout, on a large scale, with troops in the field.Today's fast-moving war has swung attentionfrom the deliberate methods of the War of 1914-18 back to the "Indian-fighting" style. Observedshooting, they say, is all-important. This is true,and never has the Field Artillery lost sight of the prime value of open-warfare methods andobserved fire. But in blitzkrieg, also, there aremany occasions where observation varies fromdifficult to impossible, even for forward observersand air observers. Map shooting, at such times, isthe only alternative. The Fort Bragg exerciseswere designed to determine whether we have beenkidding ourselves as to our abilities andcapabilities in survey and mapping. Hence in thetwo articles by Majors North and Echols,reporting these maneuvers, little mention is madeof observed fire. No inference should be drawnthat the School or the Chief's office intend toneglect the latter. Observed fires may be going oneven while survey and mapping is in progress. Butgood survey will facilitate observed fire, and willsupplant it only when observation fails. In rapidlymoving situations survey may never becompleted, yet it is always initiated against the possibility that some degree of stabilization mayoccur, when it will be necessary to rely on massshooting and schedule fires. NEXT MONTH we will begin a serial byColonel Onacewicz, Polish Army, whocommanded a regiment of field artillery servingwith the Polish corps in France in the campaign of 1940. This story is packed with psychological aswell as professional lessons. It shows that strong-hearted fighters equipped even with antiquatedweapons can stop the blitz. This Polish regimentwas placed in position behind the Maginot Line,and in the withdrawal therefrom fought to the bitter end, not even surrendering after theArmistice. The men made their way in small groupsthrough a land infested with the enemy, until after an astounding trek of hundreds of miles theyescaped from France. Don't miss the beginning of this fascinating and significant article!
The United StatesField Artillery Association
 
ORGANIZED JUNE 7, 1910
 
President
 
Major General Robert M. Danford
 
Vice-President
 
Brig. Gen. George R. Allin
 
Executive Council
 
Major General Robert M. Danford
 
Brigadier General William H. Sands
 
Brigadier General C. C. Haffner, Jr.
 
Brigadier General John A. Crane
 
Brigadier General Fred C. Wallace
 
Lieutenant Colonel Ralph C. Bishop
 
Lieutenant Colonel Edward S. Ott
 
Major Thomas North
 
Captain George L. Hart
 
Secretary-Treasurer
 
Major W. S. Nye
 
The Field Artillery Journal
A Publication for the Field Artillery of the Army of the United States
OCTOBER, 1941—Vol. 31, No. 10
 
PAGE
C
OVER 
I
LLUSTRATION
: M
OTORIZED
EVIEW OF
13
TH
FA B
RIGADE
 
T
HE
 N
EW
M
OTORIZED
D
IVISION
................................................................................. 715
 By Major Ritchie Wolfe
  N
OTICE OF
A
 NNUAL
M
EETING
, U. S. F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
A
SSOCIATION
........................ 723W
IDENING
H
ORIZONS
................................................................................................. 724
 By Lieutenant Edward A. Raymond, FA
.O
 N THE
A
LSACE
F
RONT
, 1940.................................................................................... 731
 By Lieutenant Jean Dupont 
 T
HE
B
ATTERY
C
OMMANDER 
: P
ART
I.......................................................................... 736H
OW TO
P
RODUCE AN
E
FFICIENT
F
IRING
B
ATTERY
..................................................... 743
 By Majors H. F. Handy and V. F. Burger, FA
.T
HE
 N
EW
S
AFETY
EGULATIONS
................................................................................ 748
 By Lieut. Col. George Keyser, FA
.A
 N
I
MPORTANT
T
EST
.................................................................................................. 751
 By Lieut. Col. Thomas North, FA
.T
HE
G
UNNERY
P
HASE
................................................................................................. 753
 By Lieut. Col. M. P. Echols, FA
.W
HO
S
HOT
P
OLARIS
?................................................................................................. 760
 By Master Sergeant Lewis Griffin
 C
AMPAIGN OF
F
LANDERS
, 1940: P
ART
II.................................................................... 762
 By Captain Leo Framery, French Army
 T
ANK 
B
ATTLE
............................................................................................................ 769
 By Captain Schneider-Kostalski
 G
ERMAN
P
ANZERS VS
. F
RENCH
L
IGHT
M
ECHANIZED
D
IVISIONS
................................. 772
 By Captain Ernst von Jungenfeld 
 M
OTOR 
V
EHICLE
I
DENTIFICATION
............................................................................... 776
 By Colonel John N. Hauser, FA
.T
HE
I
 NFANTRY
-A
RTILLERY
T
EAM
............................................................................... 779
 By Marshall Sachs
 F
LY
I
T
A
WAY
............................................................................................................. 781
 By Captain T. L. Crystal, Jr., FA
.W
ITH THE
O
THER 
A
RMS AND
S
ERVICES
: V—C
OAST
A
RTILLERY
................................ 783
 By Captain Arthur Symons, CAC 
.A
WARDS OF
F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
M
EDAL
....................................................................... 788W
ITH THE
A
RMIES OF
F
OREIGN
 N
ATIONS
.................................................................... 789P
ROBLEMS IN
G
UNNERY
.............................................................................................. 795T
O
D
ETERMINE
W
EATHER 
C
ORRECTIONS
.................................................................... 796
 By Lieutenant C. E. Welsh, FA
. N
OT IN THE
B
OOK 
....................................................................................................... 798A R 
ING IN
H
ER 
 N
OSE
.................................................................................................. 800
 By Rosalee C. Porter 
 F
ROM THE
C
HIEF
'
S
O
FFICE
.......................................................................................... 802B
OOK 
EVIEW
S
................................................................................................ 806
Published monthly by the United States Field Artillery Association. Publication office 3110 Elm Avenue, Baltimore, Md.Business and editorial office, United States Field Artillery Association, 1624 H Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. Address allcommunications for publication to the Washington office. Entered as second class matter August 20, 1929, at the post officeat Baltimore, Md. Copyright, 1941, by The United States Field Artillery Association. Subscription price $3.00; Canada$4.00; foreign $3.50; single copies to subscribers, 25 cents; nonsubscribers, 35 cents. T
HE
F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
J
OURNAL
paysfor original articles accepted. It is published without expense to the government. Authors alone are responsible for statements made.
 Addresses, and changes of rank, will be changed as frequently as desired, upon notification; not otherwise. Changes should reach the editor three weeks before date of next issue. Immediate notice should be given of  any delay in the receipt of the magazine. Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied by return postage.
 

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