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Field Artillery Journal - Feb 1942

Field Artillery Journal - Feb 1942

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Published by CAP History Library
Army
Army

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: CAP History Library on May 18, 2011
Copyright:Public Domain

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02/10/2013

pdf

 
 
 
THEN—
 Equitation instruction—1917 
 
—AND NOW?
For the answer, read 
 
"Signposts of Experience"
 
World War Memoirs of Gen. William J. Snow
 
Chief of Field Artillery, 1918-1927 
 
 
 
WHAT AUTHORITIES SAY ABOUT "SIGNPOSTS OF EXPERIENCE"
I neglected the first two issues of General Snow's reminiscences thinking thiswas just one more case of a retired Brass Hat telling how he won the World War.For some reason or other I happened to read the third installment, and becamevery excited about it, dug out the back issues and read those through and have been persistently recommending the thing ever since. It seems to me that no onetoday can fail to benefit by these reminiscences; and I don't mean people activelyconcerned with ordnance production alone, but with the general public, whichwants to know why we don't have 100,000 guns before breakfast tomorrow. I amglad to tell everybody I can about it.F
LETCHER 
P
RATT
.Military Analyst.
Time
, and the New York 
 Post 
.
 
 "Signposts of Experience" is a valuable book in many ways. It provides animplicit commentary on our present program and for this reason it is timely andimportant.— 
The Washington Post 
.
 
 We are in a new war and this time we have something of a real head start. Nevertheless, plenty of similar problems have arisen this time to vex us in muchthe same manner as they did in 1917. . . . General Snow has written no ordinarymilitary memoir. He has told of his World War years and problems with thegreatest of frankness and the closest regard for accurate fact. His story of creatingorder out of tremendous disorder, and of the forceful actions that were sometimesrequired, and in general of the Washington picture of the First World War is a book that every military reader will gain much genuine profit from.— 
The Infantry Journal 
.
 
 General Snow's work is a source book on our last great military effort, andevery word of it has an application to what we are doing today. Its timeliness canscarcely be overstated!— 
The Reserve Officer 
.
 
 Both as an historical document of the World War and as a reference guide toarmament production problems past and present. General Snow's book is of thefirst importance, and should prove especially valuable to libraries.
OBERT
E. R 
UNSER 
,
 Readers' Adviser in Military Science
.Public Library, Washington, D. C.
318 pages, 22 illustrations, index
 
Price $2.75 postpaid
(
10% discount to members
)
ORDER NOW FROM:
 
THE FIELD ARTILLERY ASSOCIATION
 
1218 CONNECTICUT AVENUE
 
WASHINGTON, D. C.
 
 
LT. COLONEL W. S. NYE,
 Editor 
 
LIEUTS. H. S. FORD and A. V. RUTLEDGE.
 Assistants
 
LENNA PEDIGO.
 Business Manager 
 
OF VARIOUS measures which units andindividuals may take beforehand to preparethemselves for combat, two seem preeminent.First is perfection of technique. A great pianovirtuoso daily does his long hours of finger andscale exercises. A champion football teamthroughout the season continues to practice punting, passing, blocking. So it must be with themilitary team. The executive should not only "befamiliar with" methods for laying the battery, but be able to execute them quickly and accuratelyunder all conditions. The battery commander mustnot only have been instructed in the rules for conduct of fire, he must be an old hand
at  shooting 
. The battalion commander must be ableto formulate practical plans for the support of hisassociated infantry or armored unit. And so on.Implicit is continuous and intensive practice in thefundamentals, even long after they have beenscheduled on the training program. Stress mustever be on the
 simpler 
methods, those which aremost readily understood, most easily performedand longest remembered. The reward for all thiswill be polish, high morale, professionalism.THE SECOND IMPORTANT preparation for war is familiarity—even though vicarious—withterrain in theaters in which one conceivably might be called to serve. This will point the way tospecial measures of physical conditioning,acquisition of special items of equipment (or modification of standard ones), and to special
methods
imposed by such terrain or climate. Inthis, as in many other ways, the J
OURNAL
willcontinue to render aid. Readers should pay strictattention, for example, to descriptions (in our various features) of certain desert, jungle,mountainous, and frigid localities. These are not being printed merely as travelogues or for generalentertainment. Units serving outside thecontinental limits of the United States can help,too, by sending us, for publication, notesdescribing their daily life and activities. In thisway we can keep the members of our widespreadartillery family in touch with one another, andsupply some useful hints to those who may joinyou later.THE TINTED photo herewith shows thestandard 155-mm. howitzer in action Comparethis photo with those on pages 126-7, whichillustrate the latest weapons.
 
The United StatesField Artillery Association
ORGANIZED JUNE 7, 1910
 
President
 
Major General Robert M. Danford
 
Vice-President
 
Brig. Gen. George R. Allin
 
Executive Council
 
Major General Robert M. Danford
 
Brigadier General William H. Sands
 
Brigadier General C. C. Haffner, Jr.
 
Colonel Rex W. Beasley
 
Lieut. Col. Ralph C. Bishop
 
Lieut. Col. Alan L. Campbell
 
Lieut. Col. Thomas North
 
Lieut. Col. Maurice W. Daniel
 
Captain George L. Hart
 
Secretary-Treasurer
 
Lt. Colonel W. S. Nye
 
The Field Artillery Journal
"Today's Field Artillery Journal is tomorrow's training regulations."
FEBRUARY, 1942—Vol. 32, No. 2
 
PAGE
 
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Published monthly by the United States Field Artillery Association, Publication office 3110 Elm Avenue, Baltimore, Md.Business and editorial office. United States Field Artillery Association, 1218 Connecticut Ave., Washington, D. C. Addressall communications for publication to the Washington office. Entered as second class matter August 20, 1929, at the postoffice at Baltimore, Md. Copyright 1942, by The United States Field Artillery Association, Subscription price $3.00; Canada$4.00; foreign $3.50; single copies to subscribers. 25 cents, nonsubscribers, 35 cents. T
HE
F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
J
OURNAL
paysfor original articles accepted. It is published without expense to the government. Authors alone are responsible for statements made.
 Addresses, and changes of rank, will be changed as frequently as desired, upon notification; not otherwise. Changes should reach the editor three weeks before date of next issue. Immediate notice should be given of any delay in the receipt of the magazine. Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied by return postage
.
 

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