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Field Artillery Journal - Mar 1942

Field Artillery Journal - Mar 1942

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Published by CAP History Library
Army
Army

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: CAP History Library on May 18, 2011
Copyright:Public Domain

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01/31/2013

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"100,000 GUNS BEFORE BREAKFAST"
Oh Yeah!READ:
 
"Signposts of Experience"
World War Memoirs of Gen. William J. Snow
Chief of Field Artillery, 1918-1927 
 
 
 
WHAT AUTHORITIES SAY ABOUT "SIGNPOSTS OF EXPERIENCE"
 
This book by the man who brought order out of chaos in field artilleryin 1918 is doubly valuable today. Perhaps the most illuminating chaptersof the book are those dealing with the exacting business of artillerymanufacture—H
OFFMAN
 N
ICKERSON
in New York 
 Herald-Tribune
.
 
 I neglected the first two issues of General Snow's reminiscencesthinking this was just one more case of a retired Brass Hat telling howhe won the World War. For some reason or other I happened to read thethird installment, and became very excited about it, dug out the back issues and read those through and have been persistently recommendingthe thing ever since. It seems to me that no one today can fail to benefit by these reminiscences; and I don't mean people actively concernedwith ordnance production alone, but with the general public, whichwants to know why we don't have 100,000 guns before breakfasttomorrow. I am glad to tell everybody I can about it.F
LETCHER 
P
RATT
.Military Analyst.
Time
, and the New York 
 Post 
.
 
 "Signposts of Experience" is a valuable book in many ways. It provides an implicit commentary on our present program and for thisreason it is timely and important.— 
The Washington Post 
.We are in a new war, and this time we have something of a real headstart. Nevertheless, plenty of similar problems have arisen this time to vexus in much the same manner as they did in 1917. . . . General Snow haswritten no ordinary military memoir. He has told of his World War yearsand problems with the greatest of frankness and the closest regard for accurate fact. His story of creating order out of tremendous disorder, andof the forceful actions that were sometimes required, and in general of theWashington picture of the First World War, is a book that every militaryreader will gain much genuine profit from.— 
The Infantry Journal 
.
 
 General Snow's work is a source book on our last great militaryeffort, and every word of it has an application to what we are doingtoday. Its timeliness can scarcely be overstated!— 
The Reserve Officer 
.
 
 Both as an historical document of the World War and as a referenceguide to armament production problems past and present. GeneralSnow's book is of the first importance and should prove especiallyvaluable to libraries.
OBERT
E. R 
UNSER 
.
 Readers' Adviser in Military Science
 Public Library, Washington, D. C.
Morris Swett
 First French "75" to arrive at Fort Sill. Note French personnel 
 
318 pages, 22 illustrations, index Price $2.75 postpaid (10% discount to members)
ORDER NOW FROM:
 
THE FIELD ARTILLERY ASSOCIATION
 
1218 CONNECTICUT AVENUE WASHINGTON, D. C.
 
LT. COLONEL W. S. NYE,
 Editor 
 
LIEUTS. H. S. FORD and A. V. RUT. LEDGE,
 Assistants
 
LENNA PEDIGO,
 Business Manager 
 
LITTLE OR NOTHING is to be found intraining regulations covering definitely thefire-direction technique for division artilleryand groupments. The lead article of this issue,consequently, should be hailed as meeting aspecial need at this time. Reports from thefighting abroad, both in Africa and in thePhilippines, indicate the great value of massedartillery fire. This may be obtained efficientlyonly by the methods developed in recent yearsin this country. Our officers should practicethese methods with confidence; and in keepingabreast with the latest developments the F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
J
OURNAL
will be found to be anindispensable training aid.EXACTLY ONE year ago we published adetailed study of Japanese field artillery. Unlessthere is a considerable demand therefor, thisarticle will not be reprinted. Beginning in thisissue, however, is a two-part serial on Japanesetactics. The introduction to Part I contains somedetailed information on identification of Japanese uniforms and insignia of rank. Thismaterial should be preserved for reference.A NUMBER of J
OURNAL
subscribers whohave been serving abroad during the last twoyears have written repeatedly to say that theJ
OURNAL
has been almost their sole means of keeping in touch with what is going on athome, especially in a professional sense. Since,as President Roosevelt has said, a number of AEFs may be going to distant places, it seems proper to urge that all concerned make certainthat they get their J
OURNALS
as regularly as possible. Mail will be delivered to all units,even though it may arrive only after somedelay and at irregular intervals. The F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
J
OURNAL
will then be all the moreappreciated, and experience indicates that infar corners of the world it is generally passedaround from hand to hand until it is worn out.We will do everything in our power to makesure that you get your copies. In cases whereenemy action or other causes makes deliveryimpossible, your J
OURNAL
will be saved for youand your account will be held open. However,everyone should cooperate by promptly sendingin changes of address. It is proper to send usyour APO address. Where the subscriber has notmade reasonable efforts to inform the J
OURNAL
 of his changes of address, there is likelihood thathis copies will go astray.
The United States FieldArtillery Association
 
ORGANIZED JUNE 7, 1910
 
President
 
Major General Robert M. Danford
 
Vice-President
 
Brig. Gen. George R. Allin
 
Executive Council
 
Major General Robert M. Danford
 
Brigadier General William H. Sands
 
Brigadier General C. C. Haffner, Jr.
 
Colonel Rex W. Beasley
 
Lieut. Col. Ralph C. Bishop
 
Lieut. Col. Alan L. Campbell
 
Lieut. Col. Thomas North
 
Lieut. Col. Maurice W. Daniel
 
Major George L. Hart
 
Secretary-Treasurer
 
Lieut. Colonel W. S. Nye
 
The Field Artillery Journal
 
"Today's Field Artillery Journal is tomorrow's training regulations."
 
MARCH, 1942—Vol. 32, No. 3
 
PAGE
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photo)J
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Published monthly by the United States Field Artillery Association. Publication office 3110 Elm Avenue, Baltimore, Md.Business and editorial office, United States Field Artillery Association, 1218 Connecticut Ave., Washington, D. C. Address allcommunications for publication to the Washington office. Entered as second class matter August 20, 1929, at the post office atBaltimore, Md. Copyright, 1942, by The United States Field Artillery Association. Subscription price $3.00; Canada $4.00;foreign $3.50; single copies to subscribers, 25 cents; nonsubscribers, 35 cents. T
HE
F
IELD
A
RTILLERY
J
OURNAL
pays for originalarticles accepted. It is published without expense to the government. Authors alone are responsible for statements made.
 Addresses, and changes of rank, will be changed as frequently as desired, upon notification; not otherwise. Changes should reach the editor three weeks before date of next issue. Immediate notice should be given of any delay in the receipt of themagazine. Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied by return postage
.
 

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