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* IEA Biofuels Roadmap

* IEA Biofuels Roadmap

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This roadmap identifies technology goals and defines key actions that stakeholders must undertake to expand biofuel production and use sustainably. It provides additional focus and urgency to international discussions about the importance of biofuels to a low CO2 future. As the recommendations of the roadmap are implemented, and as technology and policy frameworks evolve, the potential for different technologies may increase. In response, the IEA will continue to update its analysis of future potentials, and welcomes stakeholder input as these roadmaps are developed.
This roadmap identifies technology goals and defines key actions that stakeholders must undertake to expand biofuel production and use sustainably. It provides additional focus and urgency to international discussions about the importance of biofuels to a low CO2 future. As the recommendations of the roadmap are implemented, and as technology and policy frameworks evolve, the potential for different technologies may increase. In response, the IEA will continue to update its analysis of future potentials, and welcomes stakeholder input as these roadmaps are developed.

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Published by: Eric Britton (World Streets) on May 18, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/26/2012

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2035 2040 2045 
2050
Technology Roadmap
Biofuels for Transport 
 
INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY
The International Energy Agency (IEA), an autonomous agency, was established in November 1974.
Its primary mandate was – and is – two-fold: to promote energy security amongst its membercountries through collective response to physical disruptions in oil supply, and provide authoritativeresearch and analysis on ways to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for its 28 membercountries and beyond. The IEA carries out a comprehensive programme of energy co-operation among
its member countries, each o which is obliged to hold oil stocks equivalent to 90 days o its net imports.
The Agency’s aims include the following objectives:
n
Secure member countries’ access to reliable and ample supplies o all orms o energy; in particular,through maintaining eective emergency response capabilities in case o oil supply disruptions.
n
Promote sustainable energy policies that spur economic growth and environmental protectionin a global context – particularly in terms o reducing greenhouse-gas emissions that contributeto climate change.
n
Improve transparency of international markets through collection and analysis of energy data.
n
Support global collaboration on energy technology to secure uture energy suppliesand mitigate their environmental impact, including through improved energyefciency and development and deployment o low-carbon technologies.
n
Find solutions to global energy challenges through engagement
anddialogue with non-member countries, industry,
international
organisations and other stakeholders.
IEA member countries:
AustraliaAustriaBelgiumCanadaCzech RepublicDenmarkFinlandFranceGermany GreeceHungary IrelandItaly  JapanKorea (Republic o)LuxembourgNetherlandsNew ZealandNorway PolandPortugalSlovak RepublicSpainSwedenSwitzerland Turkey United KingdomUnited States
 The European Commissionalso participates inthe work o the IEA.
Please note that this publicationis subject to specifc restrictionsthat limit its use and distribution. The terms and conditions are availableonline at 
www.iea.org/about/copyright.asp 
© OECD/IEA, 2011International Energy Agency 
9 rue de la Fédération75739 Paris Cedex 15, France
www.iea.org
 
1
Foreword 
Current trends in energy supply and use areunsustainable – economically, environmentally andsocially. Without decisive action, energy-relatedgreenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will more thandouble by 2050 and increased oil demand willheighten concerns over the security of supplies. We can and must change the path that we arenow on; low-carbon energy technologies will playa crucial role in the energy revolution requiredto make this change happen. To effectivelyreduce GHG emissions, energy efficiency, manytypes of renewable energy, carbon captureand storage (CCS), nuclear power and newtransport technologies will all require widespreaddeployment. Every major country and sector of the economy must be involved and action needsto be taken now, in order to ensure that today’sinvestment decisions do not burden us with sub-optimal technologies in the long term.There is a growing awareness of the urgent need to turn political statements and analyticalwork into concrete action. To address thesechallenges, the International Energy Agency (IEA),at the request of the G8, is developing a seriesof roadmaps for some of the most important technologies needed to achieve a global energy-related CO
2
target in 2050 of 50% below current levels. Each roadmap develops a growth path for the covered technologies from today to 2050,and identifies technology, financing, policy andpublic engagement milestones that need to beachieved to realise the technology’s full potential.These roadmaps also include a special focuson technology development and diffusion toemerging economies. International collaborationwill be critical to achieve these goals.Biofuels provide only around 2% of total transport fuel today, but new technologies offer considerablepotential for growth over the coming decades.This roadmap envisions that by 2050, 32 exajoulesof biofuels will be used globally, providing 27%of world transport fuel. In addition to enablingconsiderable greenhouse-gas reductions inthe transport sector, biofuels can contributesubstantially to energy security and socio-economic development. To achieve this vision,strong and balanced policy efforts are requiredthat create a stable investment environment andallow commercialisation of advanced biofueltechnologies, efficiency improvements and further cost reductions along the production chain of different biofuels. Sound sustainability requirementsare vital to ensure that biofuels provide substantialGHG emission reductions without harming foodsecurity, biodiversity or society.This roadmap identifies technology goals anddefines key actions that stakeholders must undertake to expand biofuel production anduse sustainably. It provides additional focusand urgency to international discussions about the importance of biofuels to a low CO
2
future.As the recommendations of the roadmap areimplemented, and as technology and policyframeworks evolve, the potential for different technologies may increase. In response, the IEAwill continue to update its analysis of futurepotentials, and welcomes stakeholder input asthese roadmaps are developed.
Nobuo Tanaka
Executive Director, IEA
Foreword 
This roadmap was prepared in 2011. It was drafted by the IEA Renewable Energy Division. This paper reflects the views of theInternational Energy Agency (IEA) Secretariat, but does not necessarily reflect those of individual IEA member countries. For further information, please contact IEA Renewable Energy Division at: renewables@iea.org

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